Inspiration behind your Hex Series: “I’ve been obsessed with crystals and polygonal structures since growing crystals in a can with a blue vitriol solution and making hexaflexagons as a child. Although the geometry that was taught at school seemed boring to me.”

Kostya Sasquatch, graphic designer and artist

The 28-year-old graphic designer Kostya Sasquatch makes thick, vector-like graphics on a PC, all cartoon colors and geometric shapes, odd logotypes that create iconographies for systems that seem to exist only in the designer’s mind. (He has a whole series called Donut Control.) They’re the kind of designs that could be from anywhere, but they might not have looked anything like they do if Sasquatch wasn’t from Moscow. His work is influenced by street culture and science: The first, he says, doesn’t exist authentically in Russia — only as a copy of its American or European counterparts, as filtered through the internet — and the second is almost second nature to Sasquatch, considering he was raised in post-Sputnik Soviet Russia at the tail end of the Cold War. His childhood was spent watching movies like Flight of the Navigator, drawing scenes from War of the Worlds, peering through microscopes, and growing crystals.

But his native country’s greatest influence may be the artistic freedom it’s granted him: “At the moment, I work only with friends or friends of friends, because my style is a little bit specific for Russia. People often tell me, ‘That’s cool, but we can’t sell it,’ or something like that.” Another problem in Moscow: Personal taste. “There are people who know art and design but have no money to pay for it, and there are people with lots of money who don’t know art. There are serious businessmen who honestly don’t understand why they should pay someone who just makes logotypes or graphic design. So I end up making a lot of stuff for my own pleasure.”

What inspires your work?
“I get inspiration reading Wikipedia or browsing ffffound.com. I enjoy classic graphic design of the ’60s–’80s, before computers. I’m inspired by native and folk art, logotypes, and all kind of signs — any examples of ideas expressed in very simple but exact forms. But usually inspiration comes from sudden sights in the street or nature, which is beyond words I suppose.”

Favorite shop:
“EBay. My favorite searches are for meteorites, prisms, and self-made things like wood carvings and decorative figures. But I usually find the loveliest things when I’m looking for something else, which is why I like it.”

Piece you wish you’d made:
“I wish I would I finally make those pieces that are still just ideas in my mind.”

Style movement you most identify with:
“Every good artist forms his own independent movement and at the same time all artists are participants in one fundamental unity. I believe there’s some kind of universal language that each of us can speak and understand in some way. Style is part of this complicated system. Style is a medium between us.”

Album most played while you work:
“Us” by Peter Gabriel

Fictional character who would own your work:
“Woody Woodpecker.”

What a stranger who saw your work for the first time would say:
“I wish I could know.”