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Sighted
Work.Place, by Carlie Armstrong

On occasion, the editors of Sight Unseen spot a story about creativity told from a viewpoint that’s not unlike our own. In this case, it wasn’t a single story but rather a whole new blog: Work.Place, a sort of hyperlocal version of Sight Unseen that peeks inside the studios of Portland, Oregon’s best and brightest creative talents. The site is the solo effort of talented local photographer Carlie Armstrong, who documents a community of potters, patternmakers, illustrators, print shops, woodworkers, painters, comics, bicycle-builders — and even a floating workshop and gallery built inside a restored naval vessel parked near the city’s Sauvies Island — from behind the viewfinder of her Twin Lens Reflex camera. Above: The Portland Garment Factory



The ceramics studio of Liam Drain

We recently spoke to Armstrong, who explained the reasoning behind her labor of love: “I wanted to give voice to some of the artists here in Portland who aren’t necessarily promoting their own work, and also to illuminate the personalities behind such great projects. I think there is a more complete connection to craft or art when you see the genuine nature of the creator or creative space behind it.”


The print shop of Keegan Meegan Press & Bindery

“I also feel that workspaces reflect a lot of magical secrets about a person’s inner desires for what they want to make, as far as what inspires them and what kinds of processes they use in the creation of their work.”


Illustrator Dominic de Venuta

“For now I don’t plan on traveling outside of Portland since there is a never-ending population of gorgeous studios and workplaces here, but I would like to expand the country’s awareness of Portland, if I can. I think that there is a lot of work being made here that deserves attention, and it is one of the epicenters of craft in the United States at present. It is really important to me to preserve a love of tactile, handmade, artisan work, and I think Portland is a truly outstanding example of that.”


Intermedia artist Midori Hirose

To read more about each of the artists shown here and more, follow the links to Armstrong’s Work.Place blog.


12128 Boatspace, a floating art workshop gallery started by Lewis and Clark grads Kyle Thompson, Caitlin Ducey, Zoe Clark, and Lewis Feuer