Tomáš Král, Spring Mirror. "Shaped by a colored cord, Spring is a series of flexible mirrors that are thin like a sheet of paper."

Zrcadlo: The Mirror by Okolo

If you go strictly by the numbers, nearly any product typology could be said to be having a moment at the Milan Furniture Fair each year. Sofas? There are always hundreds. Cabinets? Wall clocks? Yup, those too. But scan the recent fairs not just for mirrors but for amazing mirrors, and you might be inclined to agree with Adam Štěch and Klára Šumová, curators of a show at this week’s Prague’s Designblok festival that reflects on the genre’s recent creative uptick. (These three hand mirrors alone totally slay us.) “The exhibition not only brings together our friends from the design world but also tries to define the typology of a mirror based on quite varied styles and design approaches,” says Štěch, one of three co-founders behind the creative agency and online magazine OKOLO. He and Šumová comissioned 30 designers — 15 of them international and 15 Czech — to design a new mirror for the installation, from Maxim Velčovský’s wall mirror bordered by cheap plastic store-bought varieties to Marco Dessí’s mirror that doubles as the top for a jewelry box. There are also two 1980s designs by Czech modernist Antonín Hepnar included. Thirteen of the final pieces (the ones that arrived in Prague in time for the photoshoot) are pictured in this slideshow, with images art-directed by Štěch with Matěj Činčera, Jan Kloss, and his brother Jakub Štěch both to take advantage of OKOLO’s massive paper archive and to “make compact abstract compositions,” he says. “The exhibition itself is also a kind of abstract art piece, where we weren’t thinking about function.”