The Best Things We Saw at NADA, The Armory, and Independent

Design is ingrained in us so deeply, it even affects our taste in art; at this week's art fairs in New York, we were consistently drawn to things like plywood sculptures, powder-coated metal wall hangings, antiquity-inspired ceramics, degradé textile panels, the fact that fave artist Mattea Perrotta TURNED A PAINTING INTO A RUG, and, of course, Katie Stout lamps — i.e. things that wouldn't be totally out of place at a design show.

10 Things We Loved at the 2018 Collective Design Fair

There were, to say the least, a lot of changes at Collective Design this year — the largest, of course, being the week in which it was held. But ironically, the year that Collective broke from NYCxDesign's May calendar and moved to coincide with the Armory, Independent, and NADA, is the year it featured the most instances of contemporary furniture yet.
Detroit designer Chris Schanck at Friedman Benda

In a New Show, Chris Schanck Debuts Furniture Fit for an Alien King

If you're familiar with Detroit-based designer Chris Schanck's work, you can probably easily conjure an image of it in your mind — primitive yet shiny, lumpen yet somehow slick at the same time. Since 2011, when he was an MFA student at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Schanck has been developing and refining a technique he calls Alufoil, which is responsible for that shiny, otherworldly aesthetic — it often looks as though Schanck is making executive furniture for an alien king.
ZETTELER_SELLA CONCEPT_OMAR'S PLACE_Photography by Nicholas Worley_03open

In Dreary London, A Mediterranean Eatery Inspired By the Sun

Are there new restaurants out there that aren't inspired by the seaside? First we had the Italian Riviera, then the Sydney coast, and now Omar's Place — a restaurant located smack in the middle of London but inspired by the Mediterranean. The interior was shaped by Sella Concept, a London-based female design duo whose concept for the space started with idea of the sun — the defining element of Mediterranean lifestyle.
Artie Vierkant 1

Week of February 26, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a conversation pit in the wild at The Wing DUMBO, a Mansur Gavriel store with approximately 25 percent less pink than the original, and a highlight from Milan Fashion Week (that did not involve baby dragons).

This London Flat Will Make You Want to Cover Your Walls With Concrete Tile

Darkroom founder Rhonda Drakeford recently launched a studio under own name, Studio Rhonda, for which she creates objects, interiors, installations, and even something like public art. Our favorite project is an interior renovation Drakeford undertook in which the 4x4 tile — once relegated to builder-grade status — gets an upgrade by using pigmented concrete, color-blocked and coordinated with the furniture, to create an interior that might be the most fun we've seen this year.
Sies Marjan FW18

Ever Wonder What Sight Unseen Would Look Like As a Fashion Collection?

As a design magazine, our relationship to fashion can be somewhat tenuous. We tend to cover accessories and jewelry more often than clothes, and while we love to scroll through the runway shows each season, it's mostly to identify which trends have the capacity to translate to interiors. So we were unprepared for the kinship and immediate obsession we felt when we first spied Sies Marjan's hyper-pigmented FW18 collection, which launched last week in New York.
VI, VII_Exhibition view_Eva LeWitt at VI, VII_10 Courtesy of VI, VII, Oslo_Photography by Christian Tungeopener

In a New Exhibition in Oslo, Eva LeWitt (Yep, That’s Sol’s Daughter) Comes Into Her Own

It can be difficult to approach the work of New York artist Eva LeWitt and not immediately attempt to place it in context with the work of her father, the late, great conceptual artist Sol LeWitt. So it makes sense that LeWitt, for her new exhibition at VI, VII Gallery in Oslo, might try to escape comparison entirely by using materials in such an opaque way that they reframe your initial appraisal of the work — you first must understand what exactly it is you're looking at.
Lelièvre collection Evasion

This Parisian Designer is Giving Volcanic Rock a Feminine Touch

For her Lavastone collection, Charlotte Juillard collaborated with the centuries-old stone company Ranieri Pietra Lavica, whose workshops are located at the foot of Mount Vesuvio. The collection includes a daybed, a side table, and mirror with tinted glass; Juillard says she was interested in combining the rough, raw qualities of volcanic rock with a more feminine sensibility.