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10 New Takes on the Pendant Light, From a Designer Down Under

In the category of cities we're seriously dying to visit, Melbourne is right up there with Tokyo, and now we have another reason to make the trek: the recently wrapped Denfair, a design fair now in its second year, which in the past week has introduced us to whole host of new talents, including the German-born, Melbourne-based designer Volker Haug, whose new lighting collection we're featuring today. Made by hand in Haug's Brunswick East studio, the lights represent a more minimalist direction for the designer, whose previous creations were more colorful and organic.
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The Coolest Glass Chairs Since Kuramata

Guillermo Santoma's interior work shows an acute understanding of things like just how much geometry is enough and how interesting cuts in the architecture can lift a just-great renovation into something otherworldly. Over the past few months, Santomá has released a series of chairs that embody many of those same principles.
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Zuza Mengham resin sculptures

One-Of-a-Kind Resin Sculptures, Whose Fates Are Sealed in an Flash

Most artists and designers start their practices small, then scale up their work as their ambitions, finances, and studio spaces grow. London-based Zuza Mengham has done the opposite: Back in art school, she welded semi-functional steel sculptures so large and unwieldy she sometimes had to destroy them afterwards, while recently she began turning her attention towards resin experiments compact enough to perch on a bookshelf. Both endeavors come from a similar interest in working within the transitional states of materials.
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Jongjin Park layered ceramics

You’ll Never Guess What These Ceramics Are Made From

When you first catch sight of the pieces in South Korean artist Jongjin Park's Artistic Stratum ceramic series, it's almost impossible to tell that they're ceramics at all; their textured, layered surfaces call to mind everything from sponges to unsanded wood. But the pieces were in fact made using a technique Park stumbled upon while researching his Master's thesis at Cardiff University in the UK: By painting clay slip onto pieces of paper towel, layering them, applying pigment and then firing them at 1280 degrees, Park creates a masslike trompe l'oeil.
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Kathleen Whitaker Just Took Her Simple, Geometric Jewelry Up a Notch

Nearly a year ago, we profiled the Los Angeles jewelry designer Kathleen Whitaker, known for starting the whole staple and dot stud earring trend that went viral a couple years back, and previewed the limited-edition project she was starting in parallel to her base collection — one that would elevate those designs into more rarefied territory by adding semiprecious stones to their simple, minimalist geometries. Earlier this spring, she officially debuted the results in the form of the Stone Collection, and we are coveting every. single. piece.
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Calder-Inspired Lights By a Canadian Designer On The Rise

Our third annual Sight Unseen OFFSITE opens this Friday, and we're thrilled to be sharing with you a few subjects who will be showing with us this coming weekend. First up is Jean-Pascal Gauthier, a Montreal-based designer who we discovered on Instagram only a month and a half ago and quickly snagged for our show. A self-taught designer who counts Alexander Calder and Pierre Guariche among his influences, Gauthier creates mobile-like, geometric lights from raw materials like brass, steel, wood and marble — often mixing plants and bulbs in one creation.
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The Architectural Ceramics of Andrew Molleur

Ceramicist Andrew Molleur — who's based in upstate New York and will be participating in our shoppable ceramics bar at this year's Sight Unseen OFFSITE — makes slip-cast vessels and tableware that draw on his interests in the formal language of buildings, and in Japanese and Scandinavian design aesthetics.
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Elisa Strozyk’s Ceramic Mirrors Are Simplicity at its Best

We love a crazy design experiment as much as the next guy, but lately we've been appreciating the pleasures of simplicity. There's something so nice about an understated yet surprising approach to an ordinary technique. Enter this collection of mirrors by Berlin designer Elisa Strozyk, which are accented with panels of swirly glazed ceramic. No tricks here, unless you count rotating and blowing on the clay discs to accentuate the marbling.
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Afternoon Sculptures by Erik Olovsson

Today on the site, we're featuring Swedish designer Erik Olovsson, who's debuting in Milan this week a collection of stools made from slatted pine and treated with various hues and patterns of screen-print dye. Olovsson's been documenting his experiments in color-treated on Instagram with the hashtag #afternoonsculptures, and we're excerpting a few of our favorites here today.
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A New Berlin Creative Studio Puts the Art in Art Direction

Before forming the design studio Eurodance in Berlin last year, Tom Singier and Jean Leblanc worked as, respectively, an art director with his own gallery specializing in fine-art prints, and an illustrator for clients like Nokia and Louis Vuitton — hence they were both fully acclimated to existing in the grey area between form and function.
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Gradients and Geometry in a Brooklyn Artist’s Paintings

Brooklyn-based artist Adam Henry is a painter, but you could be forgiven for assuming these works were made not by hand but by mouse. In a monograph recently published by Henry's Brussels-based gallery, Meessen de Clercq, Henry's friend, the sculptor Justin Beal, refers to the artist as having a "pre-Adobe brain, performing these Photoshop functions automatically" — blur, sharpen, flip horizontal, free transform.
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#weseefaces In These Clever Photos of Everyday Objects

When the Swiss-born, Paris-based product designer Miriam Josi started to feel restless with the pressure to constantly create new objects, she decided to collaborate with photographer Corinne Stoll to make something new out of old ones. To assemble the playful totemic compositions featured in their "Common Faces" series, the pair scavenged everyday objects both from their own homes as well as from a neighbor's basement.
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