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  1. 06.18.15
    Eye Candy
    Trek Matthews, painter

    Growing up in Wisconsin, artist Trek Matthews was initially inspired by his natural surroundings, incorporating wildlife scenes and Native American mythologies into his illustrations. But following a move to Atlanta and a short stint in Japan in 2014, his artistic style began maturing into what we see today.

  2. 06.09.15
    Eye Candy
    French Sculptor Cécile Mestelan’s Ceramic Objects

    As an MFA student at ECAL, French-born artist Cécile Mestelan got into making small-scale sculptures with plaster for practical reasons — cost and ease of transport — but stuck with the material for more poetic ones: “It’s a very powerful and open material to work with; you can do so much with it, from modeling and sculpting to engraving,” she says.

  3. 05.26.15
    Eye Candy
    Piet Hein Eek’s Wonder Room at The Future Perfect

    In case you missed it, on Saturday we recapped our favorite offerings from around town during NYCxDesign. But there was one location whose showcase we saved for its own story: The Future Perfect, where owner Dave Alhadeff has given over the entire Noho shop to Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek until mid-June.

  4. 04.24.15
    Eye Candy
    e7’s Zinc Project

    Our last bit of Milan coverage this week comes from a brand-new design studio comprised of three ECAL grads — Giulia Chéhab from Italy, Micael Filipe from Portugal and Romain Viricel from France — whose Zinc Project caught our eye in the very last row of this year’s Salone Satellite.

  5. 04.07.15
    Eye Candy
    Forma Anticum

    Part of the joy we take in creating content for Sight Unseen every day is the delight we get from telling the stories behind the makers and the images we publish. But what happens when there is literally no story to be found? That’s exactly the position we found ourselves in the other day when we stumbled across these images on Pinterest (and a situation that arises all too frequently when using unattributed mediums like Tumblr.) These assemblages — graphic totems and mixed material sculpture thingys that hit all the right trend cues — are published on a Tumblr called Forma Anticum, and seem to be created by a design studio using that moniker as well. But Google that combination of words, and all that comes up are references to the Tumblr itself; no Instagram handle exists under that name either. So, for now, enjoy the images…. But if you’re the creator of them, maybe drop us a line?

  6. 04.03.15
    Eye Candy
    Lauren Clay, artist

    Artist Lauren Clay has a background in painting and printmaking, but her work is hardly confined to the two-dimensional plane. Her body of work began as a series of large paintings on paper. But as she progressed, she became more and more interested in the inherent tendencies of paper to curl away from the wall, and she began to explore the third dimension, bridging the gap between painting and sculpture. We can see this in her delicate cut-out grids on marbled acrylic paper, which naturally curl away from the wall, creating a presence in the viewer’s space and a dialogue between paper and wall, paper and viewer, and 2D vs. 3D.

  7. 03.31.15
    Eye Candy
    Acme Releases Deadstock Memphis Objects

    It was only a week and a half ago that we reported on a cache of original, made-in-the-80s Memphis jewelry designs that the brand ACME has spent the past few months pulling from its archives and posting for sale on its Legacy website (where it appears that even more designs, particularly those by Peter Shire, have since been added). But we had to come in for round two today when we found out that, just this morning, Acme unleashed the motherlode: actual objects, long unavailable and highly rarefied, by the likes of Ettore Sottsass, Andrea Branzi, and Aldo Rossi. Many of them are original prototypes, some of them are one-of-a-kind, and none of them were ever put into mass production. We’ve posted a selection of the offerings after the jump, along with the bits of history provided by ACME — get them before the collectors do!

  8. 03.24.15
    Eye Candy
    B-FIT Assemblage by Fact Non Fact

    B-FIT, a project by the Seoul-based design collective Fact Non Fact, is the very definition of eye candy — the geometric shapes it comprises are meant not to function in specific ways, but merely to look pretty and highlight the materials they’re made from, which include iron, brass, plaster, terra cotta, marble, wood, glass and concrete. If “A-FIT,” according to Fact Non Fact, refers to all the objects in our lives that are optimized for specific functions, like chairs or door handles, “B-FIT” refers to the kinds of objects that aren’t. After making the pieces, designers Jinsik Kim, Yuhun Kim, and Eunjae Lee brought them to life in three ways: as a physical installation, as a conceptual deskscape, and as the Assemblage images you see here.

  9. 03.20.15
    Eye Candy
    Roxana Azar, photographer

    We’ve been familiar with Philadelphia-based photographer Roxana Azar’s work for some time now. Last summer, she took the snaps for our story on fellow Philadelphian Page Neal of Bario-Neal (where Azar also works), and she’s the one responsible for the awesome images of the Jessica Hans / Bario-Neal earrings that often appear in our ad spot at the top of this page. But the second she sent us the latest personal series she’s been working on, we knew we had to share — especially on a day like today, when we can only dream that spring might be around the corner. Azar digitally manipulates her photos to make them almost painterly or collage-like, but in the series we’re sharing today, many of the images began as photographs from gardens where Azar spent her childhood. “I am really interested in using the photograph as a starting point to layer, erase, rebuild, and obscure an image, turning the image into something ambiguous yet playful,” Azar says. “Ranging between chaotic clusters of poppies, fruit trees in limbo between positive and negative space, and colorful ecliptic spheres obscuring cactus pears and palms, I focus on gardens from my childhood and those I have newly explored.” Scroll down for more beautiful images and then keep tabs on Azar’s Tumblr for new work coming down the pipeline.

  10. 03.13.15
    Eye Candy
    Ivin Ballen, artist

    We love an artist who can successfully blur the line between sculpture and painting, and Brooklyn-based Ivin Ballen is certainly no exception. Upon first viewing his work, you perceive a few colored shapes (some rectilinear, others more organic) haphazardly arranged on a vast backdrop. Upon closer inspection, you begin to notice those colored shapes are an assemblage of found materials, and that, in fact, those found materials are simply just painted casts of the originals.

  11. 03.05.15
    Eye Candy
    Still Lifes by Belgian Photographer Frederik Vercruysse

    Still life photography is having a big week on Sight Unseen — yesterday we featured a pair of stylists who built their reputation on it and are now moving into interiors, and today we’re highlighting a photographer who approaches shooting interiors just as though they were still lifes. Belgian-born talent Frederik Vercruysse, in fact, describes his entire body of work as “still life photography in the broadest sense of the word,” according to his website, applying the approach not just to interiors but to portraits, fashion shows, and the occasional landscape as well (for clients like Wallpaper magazine, Sophie Buhai, and Muller Van Severen). But then, of course, there are his actual still lifes, which we’ve decided to focus on here. Shot mostly for magazines, they represent the purest form of his aim “to photograph the subject in its purest form.”

  12. 02.24.15
    Eye Candy
    Alex Ebstein, artist

    Balance balls, dumbbells, pool noodles — is the recent incorporation of exercise equipment into the visual arts part and parcel with normcore or is it something more? The latest adherent to the trend is Baltimore-based artist Alex Ebstein, who works with a variety of materials — most notably yoga mats — but in Ebstein’s hands, those basic materials become less trendy and more textural. Her brightly colored canvases resemble something Matisse may have constructed had his cut-out phase occurred during the Memphis movement. Bold and graphic from afar, the works are delightfully tactile upon closer inspection. Her use of slightly irregular grids and geometric constructions is contrasted with the addition of ambiguous organic shapes cut from yoga mats that are then inlayed or applied to her compositions. If you are in the Baltimore area, you can see her MFA show at Towson University’s Holtzman Art Gallery until May 9th.

  13. 02.16.15
    Eye Candy
    Valentin Dommanget, Artist

    Like most visually inclined folks his age, 25-year-old French artist Valentin Dommanget — who studied fashion as an undergrad before receiving his MFA at Central Saint Martins last spring — grew up with a steady diet of internet art. Having internalized a certain digital aesthetic that embraces all things geological and hypercolor, natural yet unnatural, he created a series of paintings that take those virtual influences and represent them through actual real-world handicraft, pairing paint-marbled canvases with torqued stretchers that mimic some kind of Photoshop rotation effect. Pictured above and below are selections from that series, plus other pieces that apply the same techniques to concrete tables, paper books, framed canvases, and crooked canvases that appear balanced atop geometric plywood cutouts.

  14. 02.06.15
    Eye Candy
    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s Steel Curtains

    We first caught sight of one of Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s colorful curtains at Esther Schipper gallery’s booth at Frieze New York last year, where we couldn’t stop taking pictures of how nicely it framed the crowds rushing by on the other side. But we’d forgotten all about the Spanish-born, Brazilian-based artist until more of those curtains popped up on Sight Unseen contributor Su Wu’s blog I’m Revolting last week. Steegmann appears to have a very philosophically rich practice, full of meshes and grids and insect forms that reference Brazilian oil laborers and the writings of Roger Caillois, but the curtains, from what we can tell, are pure formalism, and the best kind — they completely transform your experience of a space. They curtains themselves are made from steel mesh and produced by a Spanish interiors company called KriskaDecor, but with geometric cutouts lined in laser-cut and powder-coated steel frames.

  15. 01.29.15
    Eye Candy
    Elizabeth Atterbury, Artist

    While the Maine-based artist Elizabeth Atterbury has done amazing things with just simple shapes cut into paper and steel, lately she’s been getting a wee bit more ambitious — building a 3-by-4-foot sandbox in her studio and photographing compositions she’s raked into it, or using a bandsaw to carve grill bricks into arcs and zigzags then documenting the crumbly results. Aside from photography — which she studied in school — she also exhibits sculptures in clay and painted wood. You can see them in person now through May 10 at Colby College Art Museum in Waterville, Maine, or pick up a copy of Atterbury’s 2013 book with Bodega gallery, “In the Middle, an Oasis.”

  16. 01.27.15
    Eye Candy
    Louise Zhang, artist

    Sydney-based artist Louise Zhang’s work is concerned not with the familiar straight lines of geometry, but with the lack of any distinct form. More simply, she works with blobs. Her attraction to the formless began with a childhood fascination with slime and goo. Building off the allure of all-things-goopy, her paintings and sculptures — made from materials ranging from acrylic, oil, enamel, resin, expanding polyurethane, gap filler, and silicone — explore the infinite transformations a shapeless form can possess. Add to this an intense candy-coated color palette and you’ve got a body of work that’s both unquestionably attractive and charmingly grotesque.

  17. 01.20.15
    Eye Candy
    Peter D. Cole, Sculptor

    Let’s be honest for a second: The internet is wonderful. It’s a fantastic platform for research, and it enables creatives all over the globe to gather inspiration. It allows for artists and designers to see what exists, what’s missing, and to create accordingly. It’s hard to imagine a world without it. But what if you were a young artist trying to make it in 1960s Australia? Where did one find insight and inspiration? If you were artist Peter D. Cole, you probably looked to your art-history textbooks and the latest imported magazines from that hotbed of modernism, New York. Perusing his work, you begin to see patterns, and his influences become ever more apparent. There’s the very basic color palette of fire-engine reds, cool sky blues, and bright sun yellows, reminiscent of a Mondrian palette. There’s the tilted shapes, which could be a nod to the fathers of abstraction, the Russian Suprematists. Further still, you begin to see a pattern of grids and cubes, an obvious allusion to Sol LeWitt, one of the most famous artists practicing when Cole graduated in 1968. Mobiles similar to Calder’s, colorful forms attached by thin black lines reminiscent of Miró — we could go on but we’ll stop ourselves there. It’s through this weird, sometimes obvious amalgamation of influences that Cole is able to create original, inspired work that’s evocative yet far enough removed to be his own style.

  18. 01.12.15
    Eye Candy
    Alma Charry, illustrator

    The ____-a-day trope — wherein a designer sets quotidian goals for him or herself in order to achieve maximum work efficiency and output — has reached epic proportions lately, and you know what? We’re okay with that. The latest example we’ve come across is an advent calendar by Parisian illustrator Alma Charry, called 24RAPIDO, where the designer produced one drawing a day, each day leading up to Christmas (as well as some cute bonus GIFs). We like Charry’s work in general, which is a mix of Society 6–ready patterns, freeform ink-washed drawings, and figurative prints. See more after the jump and go to Charry’s website or Tumblr for even more.

  19. 01.08.15
    Eye Candy
    Esther Stewart, visual artist

    Even though we often talk about how globalization and the internet have vastly accelerated the velocity of cool, there sometimes seems to be a lag when it comes to scouting talents from Down Under. Case in point: Are we the last to know about Melbourne-based Esther Stewart’s incredible geometric paintings and angular sculptures? (And, aside, do Aussies pooh-pooh the use of Down Under the way San Franciscans abhor the term San Fran?) We found Stewart’s work on the Instagram of Aussie expat Maryanne Moodie, and it’s pretty much everything we’re interested in right now — intersecting planes, overlapping geometrics, and the use of color and texture to create an illusion of depth. Stewart has shown a handful of times with Australian galleries, but she also recently graduated with a Master’s degree in Cultural and Arts Management, which makes us hopeful she’ll figure out pretty fast how to get her work shown a little closer to our home turf.

  20. 12.19.14
    Eye Candy
    Marble Basics from Melbourne

    Sibling camaraderie is nothing new in the design world. We’ve been familiar with brother teams like the Campanas, the Bouroullecs, and the Peets for years, as well as sister power duos like the women behind Building Block, Block Shop Textiles, and Twin Within. Now you can add to that list Bonnie and Bliss Adams, the Melbourne, Australia–based sisters behind the new label Marble Basics. The sisters have created a new collection of tabletop accessories, rendering all of your most essential housewares in that eternally chic material (and some not-so-essentials as well, though who doesn’t love a decorative obelisk?). Each object somehow conveys the luxuriousness and durability that stone entails while maintaining an approachable price point. The products are so simple in form and function, it’s hard to imagine a better name for the company—Marble Basics.

  21. 12.04.14
    Eye Candy
    Elise Windsor, Photographer

    The photographs of Montreal artist Elise Windsor are studies in color, shape, and the definition of objecthood. Windsor’s work has been shown internationally, from New York to Russia, and she is currently a MFA Candidate at Concordia University’s Studio Arts Program. These selects, all from her series “IN TOP FORM,” consider the spatial dimensions of everyday objects and “the relationship between geometric form and optical illusions.” Experimenting with how three-dimensional objects might be represented two-dimensionally, the series both riffs on traditional product photography and explores the layered space where photography meets sculpture. It’s also interesting that the images are all formatted as squares — maybe we’re too wrapped up in the present, but we can’t help but think it’s a reference to social media’s influence on sharing, style, and delivery.

  22. 11.25.14
    Eye Candy
    Ann Veronica Janssens, Artist

    Lately it feels like whenever we’ve seen a piece at an art fair that we love, it’s turned out to be the work of one of a very small group of our favorite artists (Alicja Kwade, Thea Djordjaze, Jonas Wood, David Korty, etc) whose work seems to pops up again and again in such contexts. One of the most frequent is Ann Veronica Janssens, a British-born, Brussels-based artist whose practice is based around finding ways to visualize light and other ephemeral forces while balancing them against the more tangible qualities of architecture. Janssens has been around for awhile — she represented Britain at the 1999 Venice Biennale — but we’re particularly fond of her most recent body of work, which is more object-based than light-based. See a selection of it after the jump.

  23. 11.21.14
    Eye Candy
    Marcello Velho, illustrator

    We’ve become quite fond of these late-Friday hits of pure joy, and this one arrived in our inboxes just in the nick of time. Marcello Velho is a United Kingdom–based graphic artist. His abstract compositions have quite justly made the blog rounds in recent months, but we particularly love the new styled photos he sent of his work below, which mix Tumblr-inspired art with modern furniture icons. Velho works across different mediums including publications, posters, and textile design. His prints are currently for sale via the Australian shop Visions, alongside another favorite artist of ours: Kristina Krogh. Happy Friday!

  24. 11.17.14
    Eye Candy
    Meredith Turnbull, artist

    A few Saturdays ago, we featured Australian artist Meredith Turnbull’s incredible, powder-coated brass jewelry, but today we wanted to turn your attention to her equally terrific art practice. Navigating her website, we became intrigued by images of totemic metallic structures that were nevertheless labeled as photography. We asked Turnbull herself to clarify: “My practice as an artist has really been shaped by my training: first studying photography, then doing a degree in Art History, then later a degree in Fine Art specializing in gold and silversmithing. This affected the way I work and made me very interested in ideas in and around discipline, functionality, art and design history, and of course context! I’m preoccupied with theories and ideas about purposeful objects and their relationship to people as well as new contexts for those ideas. So I make objects across a variety of scales. Sometimes I photograph these but only exhibit the photograph; sometimes I show small objects alongside larger installation work. I’m always trying to work with scale and the context in which I’m exhibiting.”

  25. 11.13.14
    Eye Candy
    Intertidal Deployment Objects

    On a visit a few weeks ago to Design Week Portland, we spied these cute Intertidal Deployment Objects by Trygve Faste and Jessica Swanson, a married couple who are also both instructors in the University of Oregon’s Product Design program. Faste teaches design drawing and makes vibrant 3D paintings, while Swanson specializes in ceramics and sculpture, and for this work, the two combined their skills to create a series of ceramic pots and sculptures influenced by buoys. “The Intertidal Deployment Objects arose out of our interest in working with ceramic forms that would interact with and relate to the marine environment,” says Faste. “We developed our forms to reference maritime objects like navigation buoys, floats, knots, jugs, bottles and industrial nautical equipment.”