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  1. 04.21.14
    Eye Candy
    Luke Armitstead’s Ceramics

    We discovered the ceramics work of Luke Armitstead — born in Seattle, currently in grad school in Wisconsin — at Johnson Trading Gallery here in New York, where we spotted one of his colorful, organic planters standing sentry just outside the space’s entrance. Yet as it turns out, Armitstead isn’t a designer but an artist who frequently references the built environment. “In my work, one may see colorful fragmented structures, primal bodily forms, architectural models, or funky planters,” says Armitstead, whose inspirations span Antoni Gaudi and Friedensreich Hundertwasser to Sterling Ruby and Thomas Houseago. “However, aside from my organic forms, my projects are driven by structured ideas that seek to relate to, or interact with, a physical landscape or place.”

  2. 04.18.14
    Eye Candy
    New Work by Katharina Trudzinski

    Four years ago, we visited the studio of Berlin-based artist Katharina Trudzinski — who’s also a co-founder of the German fashion label Hui-Hui — to learn more about how she used local scrap wood and street detritus to create sculptural works that fed her textile designs (and vice versa). After visiting her site recently and being impressed by what we saw, we figured it was high time to check back in with Trudzinski to give you an update on what she’s been working on since our last dispatch. See a sampling of her most recent projects after the jump.

  3. 04.10.14
    Eye Candy
    New Work by Josephine Choquet & Virgile Thévoz

    We’ve been in Milan at the furniture fair all week, and though we’ll be posting more extensive coverage over the next few days, we wanted to begin by featuring a duo that’s fast becoming an old favorite of ours, despite hardly being out of school. We’ve featured the work of ÉCAL alumni Josephine Choquet and Virgile Thévoz twice before, but when we saw them with a booth at this year’s Salone Satellite — the Milan fair’s showcase of up-and-coming talents — we knew we had to share their new work. The brass and acetate Acapulco lights at the top of this post employ the same materials as their sunglasses to fantastic effect, while their new mirrors play with something that was a major trend at this year’s fair — iridescence. Inspired by a bubble’s prismatic surface, the mirrors are available in three colors that change according to your point of view. The London-bound duo are certainly ones to watch.

  4. 04.08.14
    Eye Candy
    John Hogan, Glass Artist

    It goes without saying that not every artist who grows up in Toledo, Ohio, famed birthplace of the American studio glass movement, ends up dedicating their life’s work to that medium. But for John Hogan, that’s exactly what happened — he started experimenting with glass at a young age and, even after relocating to Seattle a few years back, hasn’t stopped since. His personal work, which spans functional objects and sculpture, focuses on the optical qualities of glass; its simple beauty has endeared him to local collaborators like designers Erich Ginder and Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, the latter of whom he’ll be exhibiting with at Sight Unseen OFFSITE this May.

  5. 04.04.14
    Eye Candy
    Ashley Helvey’s #IRL Exhibition

    Today on the site, we’re giving you a peek inside Seattle creative Ashley Helvey’s home and studio, but we also wanted to show you the results of the work that was being created there during our visit. Last week, at Seattle’s Love City Love art space, Helvey debuted an exhibition with possibly the best name — and best concept — we’ve heard to date: “#IRL (internet shorthand for ‘In Real Life ‘) is Helvey’s exploration and reflection on being an artist in the age of Tumblr, Instagram and the reblog,” the show text reads. “With the vast array of technological opportunities we have to broadcast our identity and redistribute images of art and design, at what point do we create our own content? #IRL presents work created by Helvey, that references images and works from the internet, many of which have been re-posted on her blog, HunterGathererer. These works, brought together under Helvey’s distinct aesthetic and material sensibility, reject the lament that there is really nothing new. Instead, this exhibition celebrates the impact of technology and social media and its wealth of imagery as direct inspiration for creating real and tangible art objects.’”

  6. 04.03.14
    Eye Candy
    Sol Hashemi, Artist

    Growing up in Vancouver, Sol Hashemi was wedded to his father’s camera, dreaming since age six of someday becoming a nature photographer. Now 27 and living in Seattle, however, he may be the farthest thing from it — while he does wield a camera for a living, and occasionally points it at the odd plant or rock, his sculptures and still-life compositions go to great lengths to make them appear as un-natural as possible, marrying them with things like glitter, candy wrappers, and cans of baked beans. His work is all about weird — or not so weird, if you’re a Tumblr devotee — juxtapositions: “By overlaying, erasing, and manipulating images, Hashemi explores how objects communicate and shift meaning through arrangements,” wrote his gallery in a recent release. For his sculptures, it added, “the artist continues to consider and expand upon product displays, size references, and kludges (a colloquialism used to describe inelegant temporary fixes and awkward improvisations) with three-dimensional pieces that coalesce like layers in an image file.”

  7. 04.01.14
    Eye Candy
    Amanda Ringstad, photographer

    Amanda Ringstad is a Seattle-based still-life and product photographer, and though there’s remarkably little written about her on the internet, the information that’s there makes perfect sense the instant you look at her work. She has a BFA in photography and studied sculpture and art theory in graduate school; in practice, this translates to the most arresting images you’ve ever seen of staples, garlic shoots, and those weird foam thingys you put between your toes during a pedicure. She specializes in transforming banal objects into something resembling art; it’s no wonder her clients include people like Refinery 29, Iacoli & McAllister, Starbucks, and Amazon.

  8. 03.26.14
    Eye Candy
    Esther Ruiz, Artist

    Brooklyn artist Esther Ruiz refers to her sculptures as “settings,” “little parties,” and “miniature landscapes from a distant future,” but whatever you call them, they’re meant to act as colorful, abstracted symbols of imaginary places she’s conjured in her mind, and the objects that reside within them. Ruiz, who was born in Houston and graduated from the art program at Rhodes College in Memphis in 2011, showed the series in her first New York solo show this past October, at the Bushwick artist’s space Wayfarers. According to her artist’s statement, she’s inspired “mostly by space operas, pop culture, geometry and the setting sun.”

  9. 03.21.14
    Eye Candy
    Cassie Griffin, ceramicist

    Cassie Griffin is a Brooklyn-based ceramicist who was introduced to us by our friend (and sometime model) Lulu Wolf. However, when we went to search the Internet for more information about Griffin’s dreamy ceramics — and their goofy everyday object–styled photos — we came up empty, save for a post on Design Sponge. So we reached out to Griffin herself, who gave us the scoop: “I’ve been working with clay for about three years,” she writes. “I took a few classes in the city out of a vague interest, and that sparked a love for the process and I guess what you could call a knack for the material. I find endless opportunity to learn from the medium and I’m continuously fascinated by its essential elements: glaze chemistry, clay bodies, sculptural vs. functional, firing options — the list goes on. Some people have labeled my work ‘playful.’ But it’s sincere, that playfulness. I’m not necessarily conscious that I’m being playful. I am just experimenting — not concerned with producing a product but rather making things that I have a desire to see manifest in my home, a friend’s shelf, or a pedestal. It’s also a real projection of my personality, which is never really taking itself too seriously!”

  10. 03.17.14
    Eye Candy
    Rhythm and Repeat by Spencer Harrison

    Melbourne-based Spencer Harrison calls himself a “a graphic designer, illustrator, and dabbler in many things” — not surprising, then, that we took an interest in him. After spotting his work on Print All Over Me (where Sight Unseen has its own shop-in-shop), we discovered that he also provides branding and design services through his firm Studio Pennant, ran a daily blog of reductionist poster designs for awhile, has another print shop on Society 6, and recently started a new Tumblr called Rhythm & Repeat, where twice a week he creates and publishes a new impromptu pattern design as a kind of playful escape from his client work. We’ve posted our favorite excerpts from that blog here, but wait, did we mention he’s also a budding ceramicist?

  11. 03.14.14
    Eye Candy
    Francesca Capone, textile designer

    Francesca Capone creates work that experiments with textile processes and language. The RISD-trained designer employs traditional textile processes such as hand-weaving, jacquard, machine knitting, marble printing, screen-printing and various dyeing methods such as shibori. But an MFA in “cross-disciplinary writing” at Brown has also led her to explore what happens when she distorts words and meaning through photo-manipulation, scanning, and digitally layering books. Combined, these methods result in unique and striking geometric patterns on fabric and painterly compositions of abstracted textual fields.

  12. 03.13.14
    Eye Candy
    Totokaelo’s Spring Campaigns

    The cult Seattle boutique Totokaelo already carries clothing and objects so beautiful that each new season wreaks havoc on the wallets of aesthetes around the country. The only way the store could possibly improve on that game? By shooting those new collections in scenarios designed to make said aesthetes even crazier. To promote its spring Art—Object catalog, the store’s creative director Ashley Helvey masterminded two such campaigns: a photo shoot shot by Robin Stein and styled by Margaret Macmillan Jones in the technicolor plaza of Seattle’s King County Correctional Center (designed in the ’80s by Martha Schwartz and Benson Shaw), and a video, also in collaboration with Stein, that features Cameron Mesirow of Glasser along with music from her latest album, Interiors. The photo shoot includes works by SU mainstays Phillip Low, Josh Herman, and Katy Krantz, while Glasser happens to be one of our very favorite bands, so much so that Mesirow is the first-ever musician we’ll be profiling on the site, happening in the next few weeks. For now, check out the video and the photos after the jump.

  13. 03.07.14
    Eye Candy
    Mel Nguyen’s Desktop Deposits Series

    Earlier today we posted a studio visit with the young Minneapolis artist Mel Nguyen, shot by photographer Debbie Carlos. But it only featured a small selection of Nguyen’s work, in which each project is typically disassembled and morphed into three more. “If you look at a single project of mine and only associate me with that project, it will be not a complete representation of my practice,” Nguyen says. We figured it was worth showing you one more example from her portfolio: her recent clay Desktop Deposits series, made for the Kansas City, Missouri, project Objet Boutique curated by Dean Roper.

  14. 03.06.14
    Eye Candy
    The Fruit Shop by Hsian Jung

    Taiwan-born, London-based Hsian Jung works as a curator and interior stylist, but in his spare time, he recently started a hand-formed ceramics line called The Fruit Shop, through whose website he releases collections inspired by individual fruits and vegetables. “Friends were describing my pottery as reminiscent of sweet melons and pumpkins, an insight that inspired this project,” explains Jung. To launch his first series, based around the cantaloupe, he styled a series of photographs using “cheap objects from daily life that have similar color tones as the ceramics but totally different textures,” he says.

  15. 03.04.14
    Eye Candy
    Lucas Blalock, Artist

    New York based artist Lucas Blalock transforms all manner of random things into powerful images. He isolates, adapts, and manipulates, playing with the conventions of photography by exploring its limits and inherent contradictions. All this makes for a lot of very nice collisions and clashings of objects, color, and pattern. His naive use of Photoshop is jarring, forcing us to look freshly and see more. And whether this leads us to question the conflicting realities before us — and, in turn, the contemporary condition of photography itself — or purely to enjoy the compositions of color and abstracted subject matter, the end result is intriguing and hugely inspiring.

  16. 02.28.14
    Eye Candy
    Equilibrio Frágil y Simétrico by Cristian Montesinos

    For his ongoing series of miniature totems, Barcelona-based graphic and furniture designer Cristian Montesinos collects and paints scraps of found wood, which he keeps on hand for the assembly and photographing of each piece. “Biking or walking in Barcelona I always find what I need,” he says. “I keep the pieces, classified by size, and use them when I need them. When I work with these woods, I feel I’m returning to them a part of the dignity that was lost when they were thrown away. When I paint them I try not to completely cover the material, as part of the idea is to show and appreciate the tangible past of the object.”

  17. 02.25.14
    Eye Candy
    Otto Knits

    Despite a BFA from Parsons, Roula Nassar sees her grandfather as the biggest influence in her design education. “He was an engineer by trade, but he was also a self taught sculptor and photographer. If something interested him he would take it upon himself to figure out how to do it, in his own way. I really identify with that approach — working outside of a system or industry to conceive things in a singular way.” You can certainly see his legacy in Nassar’s multi-disciplinary studio Otto. Based in Brooklyn, Otto has an output ranging from photography, through books and film, to the three dimensional: knitwear and a currently-in-progress resin bowl.

  18. 02.20.14
    Eye Candy
    Fort Standard’s Home Goods

    Today, a trifecta of awesomeness: The entire home goods line from Brooklyn designers and Sight Unseen favorites Fort Standard, photographed by talented SU contributor Brian Ferry, and styled by Monica Nelson — a new name to us, but you can bet we’ve been perusing her portfolio of great work for brands like Urban Outfitters and Wilder Quarterly. Greg and Ian of Fort Standard have been majorly expanding the scope of their work lately — designing interiors for clients like Steven Alan Home and Harry’s, furniture for Matter and Roll & Hill, and, you know, creating a massive beer luge for our Bowery Hotel party last year — but it’s their growing collection of beautifully considered home goods that’s making them a household name. Pretty, minty sand-cast aluminum bowls, hanging wood-plank cutting boards, geometric stone trivets — and they’ve never looked better than they do here.

  19. 02.11.14
    Eye Candy
    Eskayel’s Jangala collection

    You know those Instagram feeds where it seems like the person is always off on some fantastic holiday in a remote locale? In our feed, that person is Shanan Campanaro, the multitalented artist and designer behind Eskayel. The San Diego native calls Brooklyn home, but in the past year, she’s been to Bali, Belize, Nicaragua, Vail… the list goes on. But in Campanaro’s case, all that travel isn’t necessarily just for fun — it provides inspiration as well for the watercolors that will eventually become bleached, beautiful patterns for her wallpapers and fabrics. Eskayel’s newest collection, which we’re featuring today, is called “Jangala” which means jungle in Sanskrit. The new collection is a bit of a departure from her signature aesthetic, in that some of the colorways are more highly saturated than in the past, but the effect is the same. We love these styled shots Campanaro shared with us, with their overflowing greenery and little totems picked up on travel — not to mention their cute product loans from Rich Brilliant Willing! See more of our favorites after the jum, and then go to Eskayel’s site to view the full collection.

  20. 02.07.14
    Eye Candy
    Slag Glas Bookends From Bazazas

    Thanks to the power of e-commerce — and the occasional abandoned shack — quite a few creatives have felt inspired lately to open small, tightly curated shops featuring weird and wonderful small-batch objects by young makers (see also: Handjob Gallery Store). The newest is Bazazas, founded by the designers Scarlett Boulting of opus and Mary Voorhees Meehan. They’ve assembled a quirky yet sophisticated selection of objects by folks like Études Studio, ceramicist Giselle Hicks, and jewelry designer Sandra Russell, but our favorite offering is no doubt this in-house series of Slag Glas Bookends.

  21. 01.29.14
    Eye Candy
    Celine SS14 Shoes & Accessories

    Okay, so maybe we’re not the first place you go for news about the ready-to-wear collections, but when we saw the new Spring/Summer line from Céline, with its brash painterly strokes and squiggles, we were knocked out. Then we saw the shoes — and had to share. There’s something almost ’90s-architect about them — like if we’d heard the one with the tubular gold heel was designed by Zaha Hadid, we might not have batted an eye — but they somehow go beyond that into something incredibly cool. We’ve included the season’s amazing cuffs for your perusal as well, in crumpled painted copper or Mondrian-inspired enameled brass, but for a look at the full collection, get on over to the Céline website. You won’t be sorry.

  22. 01.27.14
    Eye Candy
    Marc Monzo, Jewelry Designer

    Barcelona’s Marc Monzó has been designing clever, minimalist jewelry since the ’90s, but we only found out about his work this month, thanks to a current solo show at Amsterdam’s Galerie Rob Koudijs. On display until February 22, the exhibit features his new series of small brooches (pictured above) made from copper sheeting that’s been cut up and reassembled like masonry, using sterling silver “mortar.” We liked them so much we decided to delve back into Monzó’s portfolio to share more of his pieces with you, after the jump.

  23. 01.23.14
    Eye Candy
    Sevak Zargarian, Ceramicist

    Sevak Zargarian is a London-based graduate of the Central Saint Martins undergrad course in Ceramics, for which his final project was the series of Grogged Vases pictured in the first half of this post. To make them, Zargarian first creates his own “grog” — broken-up scraps of stained and fired clay normally mixed into pottery to invisibly prevent kiln shrinkage — then makes a plaster bowl mold, which he dips into a bucket of grog-filled slip in a reverse-casting process. His Grogged Jars, below, use smaller grog bits and conventional plaster molds. Zargarian focuses on process- and materials-driven experimentation based around the tactile qualities of clay, yet rather than only celebrating the hand-made element of his work, he’s more interested in how he might someday apply his studio discoveries to industrial production.

  24. 01.17.14
    Eye Candy
    Union of Striped Yarns by Dienke Dekker

    People always ask us which design fair is on our can’t-miss list, and though we’ve never been able to make it there ourselves, we’re inclined at this point to say Dutch Design Week. The work on show there is consistently kind of epic, with future design superstars springing almost fully formed each year from the Design Academy Eindhoven (see Formafantasma, Julien Carretero, and Nacho Carbonell, to name a few). Next on that list might be Dienke Dekker, a 2012 graduate whose material explorations we’re featuring today. For her project the Union of Striped Yarns, which debuted at last year’s DDW, Dekker used a variety of yarns — hand-dyed, industrial-printed and even non-traditional “threads” like caution tape — to explore striped patterning in textiles. Different colored and white spaces, combined with a variety of weaving methods, created the gorgeous effects on view here.

  25. 01.13.14
    Eye Candy
    Ryan Lauderdale, Artist

    Ryan Lauderdale is a Brooklyn-based artist who was born in Cushing, Oklahoma, and graduated from Hunter College in 2012 with an MFA in Combined Media. It’s fitting that we discovered him on Pinterest, as his thesis project dealt with the way parts of culture and history get presented, remixed, and diluted online. “What we think of as a tidy and linear historical timeline becomes wholly strange and interconnected when looking at specific visual historical threads such as car design or mall architecture,” he writes in his project description. “We see how hopes and dreams were passed from one source only to be modulated to different aims by another. The Internet, with all of its archiving potential, further establishes this rhizomatic worldview as reality. Nodes of information collide, mix and hybridize. It is here that the potential for new cultural material can grow.” Sight Unseen is the first to debut Lauderdale’s thesis — pictured after the jump — as well as work he’s done since and has yet to post on his portfolio site.