Masquespacio Shade RACO 3

This Spanish Lighting Brand Just Got a Major Makeover

In Masquespacio's latest project, the Spanish consultancy was charged with redesigning the identity and reinventing four products for the Barcelonan lighting brand Raco — as well as designing their own — infusing the Spanish lighting brand with a new sense of cool.
House Calls_Maine_Meyer_entryway_0663

Inside the Quirky, Vintage-Inspired Home of Two Epic Design Collectors

We featured Wary Meyers' incredible trove of finds in our 2012 book Paper View, and we were delighted to see some of those items pop up in the house tour Curbed published this week, including the Alex Tavoularis painting Linda's parents picked up at a Florida estate sale and the abstract canvases John was creating at the time. We've been tracking their home — a 1960s-era ranch that was renovated in the '80s — on Instagram since the couple bought it three years ago, and these pictures show the space in its full glory.

From Light & Ladder, Sculptural Objects for Every Room in Your House

Brooklyn designer Farrah Sit may have left behind a career in the fashion world long ago, but the lessons from her time there still bear a mark. Her work — both for her eponymous furniture line and for her home accessories brand Light & Ladder — has always focused on creating sculptural volumes that shift and change according to the viewer's perspective, just like a garment. Her latest homeware collection for Light & Ladder is no different — a series of sculptural planters, candleholders, vases, mugs, and trinket boxes so lovely and different they nearly transcend those categories.
Everlane Shoe Park

Kick Off Your Shoes — Literally — At Everlane’s New Pop-Up

As the once-narrow concept of the retail experience has exploded in recent years, there's been a spate of stores that purport to be something else entirely. We've seen the shop as art gallery, the shop as chicly curated apartment, and even the shop as restaurant. Everlane, the minimalist online fashion purveyor which has no stores to speak of, has launched two immersive pop-ups in New York this year that continue the trend.
Kelly Behun x Barneys

Kelly Behun x Barneys: A Patterned Pop-Up, Where Maximalism Prevails

For Barneys New York, Kelly Behun and her team have created an immersive pop-up and capsule collection, on view through October 31st, that translates the studio's super graphic design aesthetic into a collection of items for the home. Called A Kook Milieu, the pop-up was inspired in part by the pattern and decoration–obsessed 1970s New York gallerist Holly Solomon, who was known for blurring the line between art and design.
Brooklyn furniture studio Uhuru Tack

A Brooklyn Furniture Studio Goes Minimal in Geometric Steel

When we first featured the Brooklyn design-build studio Uhuru, back in 2010, they were known for creating imaginative furniture collections out of salvaged materials, but their newest collection feels like a leap in a whole new direction. After finding success last year with a geometric blackened-steel console called Tack, they've expanded the series to include stools and end tables that would make Donald Judd proud.
Seattle design studio Grain

An Experimental Collection by a Studio at the Forefront of Seattle’s Design Scene

For their textile pieces, the Seattle-based studio Grain has been known to travel far and wide, working primarily with women artisans in Guatemala — after all, that's where founders James and Chelsea Minola first met and fell in love. But for their newest collection, the two stuck a bit closer to home: a rug woven by a textile mill near their alma mater, RISD; wooden trays and benches made in their Bainbridge Island studio; bottle openers cast in a Pacific Northwest foundry; and a glass series made in collaboration with John Hogan.

A Darkly Cinematic Furniture Collection, Rooted in Retrofuturism

Use Your Illusions is the third collection we've featured by the Sydney-based design studio Page Thirty Three, but it's the most cohesive by far, inspired by nostalgic visions of the future but rooted in the here and now and the studio's interest in ritual. "I love looking at how the future was forecast 50 years ago, and comparing it to how we live today," explains co-founder and creative director Ryan Hanrahan. "In most cases I like the alternate space-age visions that I saw on the big screen — or dreamt up as a kid — much more. I think a lot of what we design comes from these childhood obsessions."

Five New Styling Pieces From a Favorite Brooklyn Housewares Brand

We once described the small-goods Brooklyn brand Areaware as straddling the line between Jeff Koons and Dieter Rams — which in practice meant that for every gold-foiled pig or pug-printed pillow, there was a hydroformed stainless steel flask, or a bottle opener with a built-in magnet. Their new fall collection falls along that same continuum, with carefully considered items that telegraph a sense of fun through either a color palette or an extremely clever concept.
Georgian furniture designer Rooms Wild Minimalism collection

Finally, You Can Shop This Weirdly Awesome, Primitive Chic Collection Stateside

Each year, we attend the Milan Furniture Fair, walking miles to hunt down the best furniture debuting in any given year. But most of the time, we end up never seeing some of our favorite pieces again, made as they are by European designers with little to no representation in the United States. Case in point: the amazing, primitive-chic furniture designed by Nata Janberidze and Keti Toloraia, the Georgian-based duo behind Rooms, which makes its American debut this week at The Future Perfect.