Week of March 5, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: ceramic chainmail becomes a verifiable trend, Hyperallergic not-so-subtly shades The Armory, and the 26-year-old behind the @EttoreSottsass Instagram handle has more covetable furniture than our small staff combined.
VI, VII_Exhibition view_Eva LeWitt at VI, VII_10 Courtesy of VI, VII, Oslo_Photography by Christian Tungeopener

In a New Exhibition in Oslo, Eva LeWitt (Yep, That’s Sol’s Daughter) Comes Into Her Own

It can be difficult to approach the work of New York artist Eva LeWitt and not immediately attempt to place it in context with the work of her father, the late, great conceptual artist Sol LeWitt. So it makes sense that LeWitt, for her new exhibition at VI, VII Gallery in Oslo, might try to escape comparison entirely by using materials in such an opaque way that they reframe your initial appraisal of the work — you first must understand what exactly it is you're looking at.

The Chilean Floral Artist Taking Over Your Instagram Feed

Getting ahold of Carolina Spencer isn’t easy. When she’s not designing ceramic vases, the Barcelona-based creative behind the floral Instagram sensation Matagalan is busy finessing ikebana-like installations for the foyers of the relaxed fashion label Masscob, or refreshing weekly foliage amongst the city’s flourishing cafés and coffee shops — Casa Bonay and Satan’s Coffee among them. In fact, you’re probably already familiar with her work even if you aren’t based in the Catalonian capital. In her feed, artfully balanced ceramic totems and ikebana-inspired botanicals make for an enviably satisfying scroll.
Portland Maine emerging artist Elizabeth Atterbury

An Artist Who Moves Shapes From Two Dimensions to Three

To understand the work of artist Elizabeth Atterbury — and how it's changed since we first profiled her almost exactly three years ago — look no further than the solo exhibition she had at Mrs. Gallery in New York this past spring: While she used to photograph the geometric compositions she created from sand, cut metal, or corrugated paper, those elements now appear both as two-dimensional images and as three-dimensional works in their own right.

Week of January 22, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: '70s-inspired lamps to pair with your vintage leather sofa, a new furniture collection by up-and-coming New York architects, and five exhibitions worth seeing now, including the beautiful wooden sculptures of Riyosuke Yazaki (above).

This Up-and-Coming Spanish Artist Perfectly Mixes Organic Shapes and Geometry

Like many of our subjects, Barcelona-based sculptor Carla Cascales Alimbau has one foot in the art world and one foot in design. Alimbau, who used to work for a large design corporation before developing her independent art practice in 2015, cites influences from furniture and architecture, including Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Alvar Aalto. But her sculptures are in fact functionless beauties, often mixing organic shapes with geometry, and the imperfections of nature with the purity of polished materials.
Excavation_WS_UB_Photo Mishael Phillip_01

Week of December 18, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: furniture meets fashion in a surprisingly chic campaign shoot, more next-level 3-D objects from Wang & Söderström, and a new series adding to the mounting case for one of our top trend predictions for 2018.
Joseph Albers
Variant ''Orange Front''
Oil on Masonite
59.6 x 68.5 cm 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Venice
Gift, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation,
In honor of Philip Rylands for his continued commitment
to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection 97.4555
© Josef Albers, by SIAE 2008

Josef Albers is One Of Design’s Biggest Influences — See What Inspired the Artist Himself

Things have changed quite a bit since we began Sight Unseen eight years ago, but one interview question has remained steadfast in our arsenal: Who are your biggest influences? And while the same answers tend to pop up often enough — Barbara Hepworth, Agnes Martin, Luis Barragán, Donald Judd — there's one name that seems to get checked more than anyone else: Josef Albers, the 20th-century artist, educator, and designer, whose book, Interaction of Color, is one of the most essential design texts ever written. But in a new exhibition at the Guggenheim, Josef Albers in Mexico, one of Albers's own greatest influences is laid bare.

One of the Art World’s Biggest Rising Stars is Inspired by Design

Less than a month after we spotted a stunning unknown painting on the walls of Kai Avent-deLeon's Brooklyn brownstone in 2015, we popped into L.A.'s MAMA gallery for a random visit and instantly recognized that we were surrounded by the work of the very same artist, Mattea Perrotta. It was either kismet or an intense case of Baader-Meinhof, but what's certainly no coincidence — because we're constantly drawn to the work of artists who do — is that Perrotta finds some of her inspiration in design.

Inside Berlin’s Most Instagrammable Installation

Like some kind of latter-day Helio Oiticica, the French artist Jean-Pascal Flavien has constructed a life-sized house, surrounded by sand, within the exhibition space at Esther Schipper gallery in Berlin. But while Oiticica's work was dependent upon interaction, it's unclear how immersive Flavien's installation is really supposed to be.