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Week of July 9, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: David Hockney inspires a poke spot — of all places — in Berlin, Roll & Hill reopens its New York showroom with a stellar new line-up, and two OFFSITE alums open up their respective Brooklyn apartments, furnished in works of their own making.
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Villa Stenersen was commissioned as a family residence in the late 1930s by Rolf Stenersen, a Norwegian stockbroker who had amassed a huge collection of modern art. It was designed, says Gudrun Eidsvik — the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design curator who gave us our tour — as a villa for receptions. "This was and is a really high-society neighborhood, and the house often played host to parties with artists and authors and theater people. The foyer was quite empty — they needed that space to be free — and the bar was essential."

Inside Villa Stenersen, Oslo’s Under-the-Radar Gem of Modernist Architecture

We first came across Villa Stenersen on a trip to Norway in 2016 and immediately fell in love with the corrugated wall, the glass bricks, the bright blue facade, the free-standing columnal fireplace, and, of course, the colors. Our visit there was so magical that when we heard one of our favorite photographers, Tekla Severin, was visiting Oslo, we implored her to photograph the house for us in all its waiting-to-be-refurbished glory.
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These Woven, Color-Field Canvases Look Almost Like Paintings

Brooklyn artist Ethan Cook is sometimes referred to as a painter, but we've yet to find an instance of him actually putting a brush to canvas. When we first started following Cook's work, after an introduction in 2012 from Iko Iko in Los Angeles, he was manipulating canvases by way of bleaching and dyeing the fibers; he then moved on to combining hand-woven canvases with store-bought ones in a kind of super high-end, abstract patchwork. His work for the past few years, though, has involved making large-scale woven pieces entirely by hand on a four-harness floor loom — our favorite iteration yet.
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Week of June 25, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week — a particularly rough one in America — was, naturally, all about escapism: A visit to the impossibly serene studio of Muller Van Severen (above), a theory on why design's current obsession with "cute," chubby furniture might be a salve for our political and economical troubles, and an incredible art park that has us daydreaming ourselves to New Zealand.
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Week of June 4, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: limited-edition prints by one of our favorite up-and-coming painters, a new line of large-scale planters inspired by Julius Schulman's Case Study House photos, and a solo show of sculptures by Carol Bove (above).
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At Morgan Lehman, Two Artists Exploring the Slippery Nature of Spatial Perception

Seeing the work of photographer Erin O'Keefe and painter Matt Kleberg side by side, it’s as if they are of one mind: the brightest orangey reds, the richest teals and greens, and the textured yellows; the crisp angles, the unexpected shapes, and the lively abstractions. Their current collaboration, a two-person exhibition titled Ecstatic Vernacular on view at Morgan Lehman in New York until May 19, is a conversation between the artists and their differing mediums.
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An Immersive Interplay of Light and Color at Volume Gallery in Chicago

The Chicago studio Luftwerk have made a career out of exploring the interplay of color, light, and colored light, as so many artists before them have done and so many will continue to do. But the defining factor of their work has always been its interaction with architecture, whether the duo were projection-mapping a light show onto Falling Water or bouncing trippy patterns off Anish Kapoor's bean in Millennial Park. This month, however, they left behind that construct to mount their first solo gallery show, at Chicago's Volume Gallery, where it's their ideas alone that are on display.
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Week of March 5, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: ceramic chainmail becomes a verifiable trend, Hyperallergic not-so-subtly shades The Armory, and the 26-year-old behind the @EttoreSottsass Instagram handle has more covetable furniture than our small staff combined.
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In a New Exhibition in Oslo, Eva LeWitt (Yep, That’s Sol’s Daughter) Comes Into Her Own

It can be difficult to approach the work of New York artist Eva LeWitt and not immediately attempt to place it in context with the work of her father, the late, great conceptual artist Sol LeWitt. So it makes sense that LeWitt, for her new exhibition at VI, VII Gallery in Oslo, might try to escape comparison entirely by using materials in such an opaque way that they reframe your initial appraisal of the work — you first must understand what exactly it is you're looking at.
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The Chilean Floral Artist Taking Over Your Instagram Feed

Getting ahold of Carolina Spencer isn’t easy. When she’s not designing ceramic vases, the Barcelona-based creative behind the floral Instagram sensation Matagalan is busy finessing ikebana-like installations for the foyers of the relaxed fashion label Masscob, or refreshing weekly foliage amongst the city’s flourishing cafés and coffee shops — Casa Bonay and Satan’s Coffee among them. In fact, you’re probably already familiar with her work even if you aren’t based in the Catalonian capital. In her feed, artfully balanced ceramic totems and ikebana-inspired botanicals make for an enviably satisfying scroll.
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Portland Maine emerging artist Elizabeth Atterbury

An Artist Who Moves Shapes From Two Dimensions to Three

To understand the work of artist Elizabeth Atterbury — and how it's changed since we first profiled her almost exactly three years ago — look no further than the solo exhibition she had at Mrs. Gallery in New York this past spring: While she used to photograph the geometric compositions she created from sand, cut metal, or corrugated paper, those elements now appear both as two-dimensional images and as three-dimensional works in their own right.
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