Ana Kras Natalie Weinberger

Ana Kras and Natalie Weinberger’s Powerhouse Collab at Picture Room

On view through August 20th at Brooklyn’s Picture Room, Family pairs pencil drawings by artist and designer Ana Kraš with stacked stoneware sculptures — each comprised of a set of functional vessels wheel-thrown by Brooklyn ceramicist Natalie Weinberger — in an exploration of emotional interplay between inanimate objects. “We started calling each set a family,” Weinberger says, “because we’re working with separate figures that share an emotional attachment.”
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Fisher Parrish The Paperweight Show

At a New Brooklyn Gallery, The Paperweight is Anything But Obsolete

If there's anyone who knows from paperweights, it's New York gallerists Patrick Parrish and Zoe Fisher. The two began working together when Fisher — who at the time was helming her own fledgling gallery — began working for Parrish at his Tribeca space, which not only sells vintage examples of those sculptural objects but also boasts a well-documented obsession with Carl Aubock (perhaps king of all paperweight-makers). So it makes sense that when Fisher and Parrish finally decided to go into business together, they would choose the paperweight as their first canvas.
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Quiet Town stylish bathroom accessories

Meet the Couple That’s Reinventing Bathroom Style

Call it what you will — wash room, water closet, commode, loo — the bathroom is nothing if not the unsung hero of many a home and apartment. It is a place of quiet refuge for space-deprived urbanites and, if Pinterest is any indication, an actual spa if you live outside New York City. No one knows this better than Lisa and Michael Fine, the founders of Quiet Town (she, a stylist, he, a photographer). They've taken their complementary skill sets and combined them to make a covetable line of bath essentials including shower curtains, rugs, and wall hooks that pleasingly upend convention while marrying (often geometric) form to function.
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A Turner Prize–Winning Architecture Collective Sets Up Shop in Brooklyn

U.K. architecture collective Assemble has created an installation — dubbed “A Factory As It Might Be” — in the courtyard of A/D/O, the brand-new, forward-looking design space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The temporary factory features an industrial clay extruder, which Assemble — and their Liverpool-based social enterprise the Granby Workshop, along with fellow collaborators — used to make the factory’s cladding as well as a host of products from dinnerware to planters. The effort is the debut US project for the team, who famously became the first architects to win the Turner Prize in 2015.
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Seven Perfect Household Essentials for Your Favorite Minimalist

When we checked in with Jamie Wolfond this time last year, he had just relaunched Good Thing's website to better showcase the beauty and simplicity of the brand's accessible design objects. That momentum hasn’t waned. Continuing Good Thing's mission of creating practical tools with consideration and staying power, the latest collection is its largest yet.
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Two Former Architects on Finding Common Ground (In the Middle of Manhattan)

Some of Pelle's work belies their background in architecture — their Klemens mirror, for instance, stretches a thin mesh fabric over a structure that looks like scaffolding. More often than not, their work is organic and even whimsical, with their two best-known projects being a chandelier that daisy-chains bubble-like glass globes and their Soap Stones, for which they hand-carve dyed and fragranced glycerin soap into a gemlike shape. But all of their work speaks to the idea of finding common ground despite their differences.
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Strauss Bourque-Lafrance

Strauss Bourque-Lafrance and the Deconstructed Domestic Space

Strauss Bourque-LaFrance’s work reflects a holistic approach to materials informed by the social function and status of objects as well as our relationship to them; the roles they play in our lives as symbols, signs, and totems. In Bourque-Lafrance's world, objects and paintings often get mixed up together with sculpture and interior design; his approach may be best summed up by his gallerist, Rachel Uffner, who calls it: “painting-in-the-expanded-field, painting-as-collage, painting-as-performance, and painting-as-sculpture.”
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Week of October 10, 2016

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week was all about where we'll be doing our fall shopping: at a cactus and ceramics pop-up in New York, at the upcoming sale of David Bowie's Memphis trove (we wish), and at a handful of great new stores, including the achingly hip Seattle boutique Rizom, pictured above.
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Natalie Weinberger ceramics

The Dusky, Sophisticated Beauty of Natalie Weinberger’s Ceramics

Natalie Weinberger’s ceramics draw you in with their dusky beauty while a sense of mystery keeps you looking. Her pieces have the stillness of arrested movement; they seem both captured in time but not limited by any one moment, nodding to pottery’s long history, but also feeling oh so current. Or, as she puts it: “I love a good remix.”
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From Light & Ladder, Sculptural Objects for Every Room in Your House

Brooklyn designer Farrah Sit may have left behind a career in the fashion world long ago, but the lessons from her time there still bear a mark. Her work — both for her eponymous furniture line and for her home accessories brand Light & Ladder — has always focused on creating sculptural volumes that shift and change according to the viewer's perspective, just like a garment. Her latest homeware collection for Light & Ladder is no different — a series of sculptural planters, candleholders, vases, mugs, and trinket boxes so lovely and different they nearly transcend those categories.
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Bower American Design

Bower On Becoming One of the Hottest Studios in American Design

Bower's products and furniture always feel just right for the moment in which they're made, somehow ahead of what's current but not so trendy that they'll soon fall out of fashion. That these sophisticated harbingers are made from an enormous Brooklyn woodshop with no A/C seems about right when you meet them.
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