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In a New Exhibition, Six Ceramicists Try Their Hand At Furniture

For Lawson-Fenning in Los Angeles, Bari Ziperstein, Michele Quan, Jonathan Cross, Heather Rosenman, Victoria Morris, and Beth Katz (the artist behind Mt. Washington Pottery) have each created a series of ceramic tables, including stacked, saturated totems by BZippy, Brutalist slabs by Jonathan Cross, and Eastern iconography by MQuan. In other words, each piece is a recognizable extension of the artist's current body of work, but unique in its point of view.
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Salvatore Fiume Italian Ceramicist

Meet the Late Italian Ceramicist Inspiring Today’s Coolest Artists

As trend scouts, avid social media consumers, and Google Image Search addicts, we often happen across works, names, and images that cause our internal YES bells to go off. Starting today, we've decided to give them the airtime they deserve in our new Current Obsession column, the first of which is devoted to Salvatore Fiume — the late Italian artist whose lumpy, curvaceous sculptures seem to somehow be having a resurgence in the work of designers like Sigve Knutson, Thomas Barger, and Carl Emil Jacobsen.
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These Classical-Meets-Contemporary Ceramics Are a Major Discovery

It's not every day that we make a discovery on the level of Nicolette Johnson, when some random Instagram rabbit hole leads us to a trove so vast we can hardly believe no one had tipped us off to it sooner. But that's exactly what happened last month, when we stumbled onto an image of Johnson's vases and found ourselves practically hyperventilating — not just over the works themselves, but the fact that the young Brisbane-based talent only started working with ceramics at all less than two years ago.
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These Ceramics in a Former French Salon Are the Exact Amount of ’80s Nostalgia We Need Right Now

When Italian designer Valentina Cameranesi and curator Matylda Krzykowski first saw the former hairdresser's shop in Toulon, France — where the interior design portion of the annual Design Parade festival is held this year — its windows were plastered with the word "Féminin." Perhaps it was fate, because the word is an apt reference to Cameranesi’s work, which is on view in the former salon in her first solo exhibition until September 24.
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Irina. show RCA

Six Talents to Watch from RCA’s 2017 Graduate Show

Despite continued uncertainty about the effect Brexit might have on applications from students abroad, this year’s Royal College of Art graduate show was a celebration of global design talent, showcasing some of the best emerging talents from the EU and beyond. Here are six of our favorites.
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This Heath Ceramics Alum Just Made the Chicest Salt Lamp We’ve Ever Seen

A little more than a decade ago, when Christina Zamora was just an art-school grad living in the Bay Area, she landed a job that would go on to inform her life and her practice in immeasurable ways: She became a designer for Heath Ceramics, the midcentury California pottery brand whose early-2000s revival coincided with Zamora's tenure there. "I was surrounded by her way of thinking and working every single day. This experience had a profound impact on how I approach design." That becomes clear from the moment you encounter the first product made by Zamora's year-old, Oakland-based studio, Brave Matter.
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Ana Kras Natalie Weinberger

Ana Kras and Natalie Weinberger’s Powerhouse Collab at Picture Room

On view through August 20th at Brooklyn’s Picture Room, Family pairs pencil drawings by artist and designer Ana Kraš with stacked stoneware sculptures — each comprised of a set of functional vessels wheel-thrown by Brooklyn ceramicist Natalie Weinberger — in an exploration of emotional interplay between inanimate objects. “We started calling each set a family,” Weinberger says, “because we’re working with separate figures that share an emotional attachment.”
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When Paintings Become Sculptures: Jaime Keiter’s Frank Stella–Inspired Ceramics

When Jaime Keiter made a move to Atlanta last year, she decided it was time focus on her artwork, which included a series of simple, geometric pencil drawings on paper. “Moving to a new place gave me a new perspective on life, and I had less pressure to make art that was formulaic,” explains Keiter. After a friend suggested they join a ceramic studio on a whim, Keiter’s vision for her one-of-a-kind ceramic sculptures became fully formed. “I had been thinking of a way to make paintings that are unexpected — in a medium other than paper and wood. In the ceramics studio, it all sort of clicked."
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