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Kathleen Whitaker Just Took Her Simple, Geometric Jewelry Up a Notch

Nearly a year ago, we profiled the Los Angeles jewelry designer Kathleen Whitaker, known for starting the whole staple and dot stud earring trend that went viral a couple years back, and previewed the limited-edition project she was starting in parallel to her base collection — one that would elevate those designs into more rarefied territory by adding semiprecious stones to their simple, minimalist geometries. Earlier this spring, she officially debuted the results in the form of the Stone Collection, and we are coveting every. single. piece.
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Week of April 25, 2016

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: the best in totally affordable and totally unaffordable fashion and design, two illustrations and a Toronto house we wish we could move into immediately, and a few more Milan fair stragglers, including the playful room divider above by Ana Arana.
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A good example: A pair of Percival Lafer chairs Avent-deLeon hunted down for a year, paired with two drawings she commissioned from the store’s former coffee barista Adrienne White — AKA Dinosaur Dust — and a beige marble table she found on Etsy. “I was looking for a coffee table for awhile that wasn’t white Carrara marble,” she says. “I’m big on not having too much of the same material in one space.”

Sincerely, Tommy Is An Oasis of Chic in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn

Kai Avent-deLeon's Brookyn boutique pairs avant-garde clothing from little-known emerging fashion lines with a rotating cast of objects and accessories she finds at markets on her travels, plus things like art she sources from Etsy and from her friends, vintage housewares from the Seattle shop Mono-Ha, and chairs she designed after going down a Donald Judd rabbit hole on Pinterest a few years back. It's impossible not to get sucked in.
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Moving Mountains jewelry

Be the First to Snag New Jewelry by Moving Mountains

Today is a happy day for anyone obsessed with the furniture of Moving Mountains's Syrette Lew — she's just debuted a new jewelry line that's infinitely more accessible, and we made sure we were the very first ones to carry it, in the Sight Unseen Shop. Not only is almost everything in the collection under $250, it shares the same inspirations as her ultra-popular Palmyra lamp.
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architecture-inspired jewelry by Agmes

The Jewelry Line Every Design Lover Should Be Wearing Now

Plenty of jewelry lines are inspired by architecture, but rarely does one transcend a mere aesthetic exercise into the realm of the truly, truly chic. AGMES, the brand new line by New York designer Morgan Solomon, is a pretty exciting exception — not only does Solomon name-check the likes of Cini Boeri and Bertrand Goldman when talking about her inspirations, but her pieces have such a strong, sculptural presence that you could picture passing them on to your children someday.
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A Beige Interior By BROOK&LYN That’s the Opposite of Boring

Our website is known for its love of color. Today, though, we're taking a rare moment to celebrate the lack thereof, with a Los Angeles interior project by BROOK&LYN and Akin Creative that proves a rare exception to the "boring beige" maxim. The two studios recently teamed up to outfit the new L.A. outpost of Bassike, an Australian fashion brand known for its high-end line of basics, and took visual inspiration from the label's understated approach.
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Bario Neal Men's Jewelry

Bario Neal & Linder Just Broke the Rules of Men’s Jewelry

The Philadelphia-based jewelry design studio Bario Neal has long offered wedding bands for men, and particularly expressive ones, at that: Some of its rings look like carved petrified wood, some have a hammered texture, some are boldly striped. But there's one steadfast rule of men's jewelry that even Bario Neal has never dared to break — until now.
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Week of November 2, 2015

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A sneak peek at Lex Pott's new collection for Design Miami, a glimpse inside the home of Gemma Holt and Max Lamb, and a new view on Brazilian modernist furniture, pictured above.
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Painter and Accessories Designer Kindah Khalidy

Working across fine art, fashion, and design, Khalidy is the driving force behind her own label — offering a selection of wearable art, patterned accessories and hand-painted textiles — as well as one part of the duo Pamwear.
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Week of October 12, 2015

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. In this week's post: an iridescent side table, a Michael Graves apartment you never knew existed, and a sneak peek at our upcoming Dutch Design Week coverage (pictured above).
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Sight Unseen, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Last month, when the watch brand Mondaine asked for a peek into a day in the life of a Sight Unseen editor, I dragged our trusty photographer Paul Barbera all around the Brooklyn enclave popping in on our friends and shooting future studio visits for the site, from Workaday Handmade to Confettisystem.
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Still Lifes by Belgian Photographer Frederik Vercruysse

Still life photography is having a big week on Sight Unseen — yesterday we featured a pair of stylists who built their reputation on it and are now moving into interiors, and today we're highlighting a photographer who approaches shooting interiors just as though they were still lifes. Belgian-born talent Frederik Vercruysse, in fact, describes his entire body of work as "still life photography in the broadest sense of the word," according to his website, applying the approach not just to interiors but to portraits, fashion shows, and the occasional landscape as well (for clients like Wallpaper magazine, Sophie Buhai, and Muller Van Severen). But then, of course, there are his actual still lifes, which we've decided to focus on here. Shot mostly for magazines, they represent the purest form of his aim "to photograph the subject in its purest form."
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