Tag Archives: Fashion

  1. 12.14.13
    Saturday Selects
    Week of December 9, 2013

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, and events from the past seven or so days. This week: a designer-made winter salad recipe, a stunning new furniture collection by POOL (pictured above), tools so chic they make us want to start gardening, an explosion of pop-up stores and sand piles, and more.

  2. 12.13.13
    The Essentials
    50 Gifts We’re Coveting

    Introducing the first annual Sight Unseen holiday gift guide! We’ve been scouring our favorite shops, both here and abroad, and starting yesterday we’ve been featuring 25 items per editor. Today’s picks come from Monica, whose taste runs more towards all things monochromatic, graphic, and geometric.

  3. 12.04.13
    Eye Candy
    Alpha Cruxis by Rebecca Martin

    Tasmanian-born designer Rebecca Martin started the fashion label Alpha Cruxis earlier this summer from her studio in Neuköln, Berlin. Its launch collection consists of five geometrically shaped handbags that Martin meticulously handcrafts from rigid 3mm-thick Italian leather, using methods she likens more to carpentry than fashion design — sanding, carving, etc. Shot by Martin’s friend Monika Holtzer, the lookbook for the collection pairs the dark, angular bags with colorful everyday objects like balloons, fennel, screwdrivers, and onion bags.

  4. 12.02.13
    Invitation
    Shop Sight Unseen on Print All Over Me

    In April, we introduced you to BYCO, a production platform and online shop for custom clothing designs submitted by up-and-coming fashion talents. But BYCO also had a small section for housewares, where designers could apply imagery to a standardized selection of pillows, duvets, and curtains — an idea that co-founders Jesse and Meredith Finkelstein have taken one step further with their new spinoff project, Print All Over Me. The site harnesses the same overseas manufacturing capabilities the pair utilize for BYCO, but instead of producing custom pieces, it offers designers a choice of eight blanks onto which they can apply any image file — think CafePress, but with shirts, sweatpants, hats, pillows, totes, and scarfs that are actually fashion-forward (Jesse’s also the designer behind the New York label JF&Son). Print All Over Me is technically still in beta, but we were so excited about its possibilities that we invited a few friends — Will Bryant, Mel Nguyen, New Friends, Clay Hickson, and Tim Colmant —to post a few items just for us. Read on to check out and shop their mini-collections, or create and sell your own designs.

  5. 11.30.13
    Saturday Selects
    Week of November 25, 2013

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, and events from the past seven or so days. This week: hot guys in design, a new online furniture shop in Berlin, Artsy’s definitive Design Miami preview (including the Jeff Zimmerman ombre vases above), and more.

  6. 11.07.13
    Where They've Been
    Shinola’s Daniel Caudill in Detroit

    It wasn’t too long ago that bringing up Detroit made people feel sad. For decades it was America’s most downtrodden city; the first and only time I visited, 15 years ago, at age 19, I gasped dramatically upon arrival that it looked like its downtown had literally been bombed out and abandoned. But two or three years ago, Detroit got a brand new narrative, unfortunately by way of an annoyingly over-baked media frenzy that branded it the next hipster haven, complete with coffee shops, urban farms, and its first Whole Foods. The arrival of Shinola — which opened a watch factory and bicycle workshop there last year — quickly became a part of that narrative, even moreso when it opened its second retail location in New York a few months ago and began introducing the East Coast to its $2,000 artisanal bicycles and handmade leather goods. And yet the company is playing an important part in what’s really going on in Detroit, beyond all the coffee shops and organic foods, which is that it’s in the process of replacing parts of its failed industrial economy with a creative one, and that its residents and legislators are counting on that renewal to get the city back on its feet.

  7. 11.04.13
    Factory Tour
    Mykita’s Berlin Headquarters

    Just a few blocks from the three-story factory where Mykita eyeglasses are designed, prototyped, and assembled by hand by a team of skilled workers, there’s a world-renowned contemporary art museum currently showing works inspired by Joseph Beuys’s vision of the future. There’s a new bar where fancy hipsters go to sip $15 Moscow mules, and more than a few new “luxury” condo buildings, which have begun sprouting like weeds in the area in the past five years. That’s about when Mykita moved its headquarters to their current location in the middle of Berlin’s Mitte neighborhood, which is basically the New York equivalent of setting up shop in Soho. It doesn’t actually manufacture from scratch there the metal and acrylic frames that are its signature — the parts are sent up in flat batches from South Germany — but it does just about everything else that’s required to construct and ship out between 600 and 1,000 pairs of glasses per day to the likes of Colette and Opening Ceremony. “It’s a business philosophy for Mykita that everything is under one roof,” says Lisa Thamm, head of Mykita PR, who gave us a tour of the factory this past June. “It’s actually easier that way, especially when your graphics team, your designers, everybody is really into detail.”

  8. 10.16.13
    Sight Unseen Presents
    The Etienne Aigner Flagship Opening

    In many ways, the story of Etienne Aigner is a personal one for us. As a kid growing up in the Midwest, I remember coveting my mother’s gold horseshoe–embossed heels, and then, as a teen, scouring the shoe racks at Marshall’s for a pair of my own. And Monica? I’m pretty sure when we first met she had a dozen pairs of the brand’s vintage loafers and Priscilla heels, and she happily passed that obsession — complete with eBay alerts and frantic Etsy searches — on to me. So we were more than thrilled earlier this year when Sight Unseen was approached by the 63-year-old heritage brand, now led by creative director Daniela Anastasio Bardazzi, to help conceive and curate the opening of their first-ever flagship in New York’s Soho.

  9. 10.08.13
    Sighted
    Q+A With Shabd on Martha Stewart Living

    When we interviewed Brooklyn artist and fashion designer Shabd for our Paper View book a year and a half ago, it was all about the fine art practice she sidelined in order to start her tie-dyed clothing and accessories business. But with this post, everything comes full circle — now that Shabd has a book out of her own, filled with tutorials on her dyeing techniques, we’re finally taking the chance to hear more about what she actually does on a daily basis, by way of an interview recently posted on the Martha Stewart Living blog. As you may recall from our original story, Shabd learned to tie-dye somewhat by accident, after attending a garden party where it was one of the featured activities, and then, according to the interview, which we’ve excerpted parts of below, “spent a year playing around and developing new techniques to create dye patterns that were more grown-up and modern, beyond what I had seen before.” You can learn to master them as well by buying her book, “Tie-Dye: Dye it, wear it, share it,” but meanwhile, check out the Q+A after the jump that delves deeper into Shabd’s methods and inspirations.

  10. 10.03.13
    Self Portrait
    Keehnan Konyha’s Safe House USA

    How do you know when someone’s a child of the ’80s? Posting photos of Lisa Frank’s headquarters on their blog is a pretty obvious clue. Brooklyn interior designer Keehnan Konyha has been tracking his eccentric tastes on his freestyling eponymous site for the past three years, and dipping into his formative decades liberally, so it didn’t surprise us a bit when he totally went there for his Sight Unseen Self Portrait. His newest project is a bedding textile company called Safe House USA that’s inspired by streetwear and the visual influences he tracks on the web, and he couldn’t imagine a better way to showcase his first collection than to pin it up to a white metal grid in a way that should be familiar to anyone who grew up in the era of cheesy department store displays and layaways at TJMaxx. Published here are the exclusive photos Konyha shot of the series — which is printed with internet-approved motifs like faux marble, punctuation marks, and the black and white mottle unique to composition notebooks — along with the backstory behind both the collection and his vision for this project.

  11. 10.01.13
    Sighted
    ALL Knitwear Fall Update, featuring RO/LU

    We never imagined we’d be the website bringing you images from a fashion brand’s lookbook, but the ones we’re featuring today were just too perfect to ignore. To launch her fall ALL Knitwear collection — which includes crewnecks and pompom hats in new geometry-inflected patterns and color combos — Sight Unseen fave Annie Larson reached out to another studio with a happily low-tech approach: the Minneapolis-based furniture duo ROLU. It’s a serious match made in heaven, as these photos — shot by Mary C. Manning at Mondo Cane in New York — can attest. Both Larson and ROLU make deceptively simple-looking work that belies serious craftsmanship; both studios have Midwestern roots (Larson grew up in Wisconsin and used to work at Target HQ in Minneapolis.) But it also makes perfect sense on another level. ROLU often speak about their affinity for theatrical sets, so though their work is normally shown on a gallery level, we can’t imagine a better context than this in which to show it.

  12. 09.18.13
    What We Saw
    At Capsule New York

    Don’t worry, we’ve got eyes on the ground at the mega–big deal trade fair happening this week — i.e. the London Design Festival — but since your editors are sadly missing out on those festivities, we thought we’d first offer a glimpse inside a trade show we ourselves had never attended until this week: Capsule, the six-year-old, 12-times-a-year fashion and lifestyle event for independent designers. This month was the SS14 women’s edition, and having mostly attended design fairs we weren’t really sure what to expect. Capsule is held at a massive venue on the East River that doubles as basketball court and event space (it’s where the New York edition of the NADA art fair was this spring), and the soundtrack was appropriately bumpin’. We were there mostly to get face time with some of our favorite designers — like Ilana Kohn, Wing Yau, Ellen van Dusen, and SU regulars like Chen Chen and Iacoli & McAllister — but we also spent lots of time browsing in the hopes we’d discover someone new to write about (or something new to take home from the cash-and-carry shop portion, which of course we did in spades.) Here are some of our favorite finds from the afternoon.

  13. 09.17.13
    What They Bought
    LDF 2013: So Sottsass at Darkroom London

    Had we thought of it ourselves, “That’s so Sottsass” is a phrase we might have used hundreds of times over the past five years to describe all the designs spawned by the recent mega-Memphis revival. Crazy colors, clashing patterns, geometric shapes on shapes — it all came rushing back in homage to Ettore and his crew, a fact which the intrepid duo behind our fave London store Darkroom chose to acknowledge this week with the debut of their So Sottsass collection. Launching last night — day one of this year’s London Design Festival — the installation includes both Memphis-like objects by outside designers and new pillows and wrapping papers conceived by Darkroom owners Rhonda Drakeford and Lulu Roper-Caldbeck as part of their ongoing in-house collection. There’s also an amazing window display by up-and-coming Italian stylists StudioPepe. Drakeford took time out of her crazy LDF schedule to not only share photos of So Sottsass with us, but to tell us the inspiration behind the collection: “At Darkroom, we’ve always had a penchant for maximalist modernism — bold colour palettes, big patterns, and brave combinations,” she says. “In a decade of ‘greige,’ we love exploring how being bold and playful with design can fit into modern life.”

  14. 09.16.13
    At Home With
    Erin Considine, textile and jewelry designer

    Midway through our visit to Erin Considine’s Greenpoint, Brooklyn apartment earlier this summer, we began talking about her parents, who — no surprise here — are interior designers. She told us a story about her father being on a job site in Connecticut in the 1980s, where a company was giving away all of its Knoll furniture. A set of Mies van der Rohe Brno chairs here, a Saarinen Tulip table there — these are sorts the things the Brooklyn jewelry designer grew up with. When my jaw dropped, she shrugged. “It’s just being in the right place at the right time,” she says.

  15. 08.14.13
    Sight Unseen Presents
    The BYCO Design Contest Results!

    A few months ago, we launched a contest with BYCO, the new micro-financing site for fashion and housewares designers, founded by Jesse Finkelstein of JF & Son and his sister Meredith. The Kickstarter-like site invites designers to submit products, which then must be funded by supporters in order to cover the costs of making a prototype. Our contest allowed readers to submit designs that, if chosen by Sight Unseen’s editors, would bypass the funding stage and move straight to production. At the time, we had no idea what would happen. Would anyone enter? If they did, would those brave souls be plucked from the world of designers we were already familiar with? Happily, the pool was wider than we ever could have imagined. The five chosen designers, who were picked relatively blindly, range from an ITP design student to a contractor-turned-artist in San Diego to — just one! — former Sight Unseen subject, the lovely Jennifer Parry Dodge of Ermie (whose Kid Gunta duvet is shown above). Which just goes to show that BYCO isn’t merely for amateurs looking to get a foot in the door: Even for a pro like Dodge, BYCO offers opportunities that would never be possible with a small-scale production set-up. “This was an amazing opportunity, and it’s a fantastic service that BYCO is providing to independent designers such as myself,” Dodge says. We couldn’t agree more! Read on to get to know the winners of the Sight Unseen/BYCO contest and click here to purchase their incredibly cool designs.

  16. 07.25.13
    Eye Candy
    The Plastics Collection at Syracuse University

    Eye candy in the literal sense, these sunglasses were manufactured by the Foster Grant Corporation, mostly around 1960-1980, and are housed in the Plastic Collection at Syracuse University. The archive exhibits a nearly endless range of products, from astronaut helmets to telephones. “The Plastics Collection at the Syracuse University Library serves as a research and programming resource to advance the study and understanding of plastics in modern society … the collection includes over 5,000 plastic objects produced from the late 19th century to the present day.”

  17. 07.12.13
    Eye Candy
    Studio Toogood for Phillip Lim

    Phillip Lim’s latest collection is on display as a pop up shop at Selfridges designed by the fantastic visions of Studio Toogood. Inspired by the epic poem Paradise Lost by John Milton, Studio Toogood manufactured a heavenly space for Lim to exhibit his pieces. A magnificent scene of smoky mountains and lush foliage are backdrop to the many objects and clothing that inhabit the space. A mix of greens and coppers form an earthy palette.

  18. 07.10.13
    Eye Candy
    Saskia Pomeroy, Illustrator

    Saskia Pomery’s super shapes and dott-y patterns glide freely over and under one another. Primary colors mesh swimmingly with Miami Vice like pastel hues. She recently collaborated with fashion designer Rebecca Torres to create a skintight series of bodysuits and slinky dresses in printing geometric graphics onto modern performance fabrics. Perfect fit prints. Pomery lives and works in London.

  19. 07.03.13
    At Home With
    Annie Larson, knitwear designer

    If you follow Annie Lee Larson’s Instagram — and chances are good that you do, considering the New York knitwear designer’s followers almost tip into the five digits — you might envision that she lives in some Peter Halley-meets-Memphis–inspired fantasyland, all primary colors, geometric patterns, and kitschy throwback accessories (hello Bananagrams!) But the truth is, Larson’s 5th-floor East Village walk-up doesn’t appear all that crazy upon first glance. A pretty but small, light-filled, plant-friendly apartment, the place is largely decorated in black and white, save for a trio of painted shelves where Larson keeps her most prized possessions, and a one-two punch of colorful striped and polka-dot bedding. It’s only upon closer inspection (and I mean, really close, considering Larson’s love of miniatures) that her oft-photographed influences begin to reveal themselves — dice, Swatch watches, Japanese toys, and ’80s electronics among them.

  20. 06.28.13
    Eye Candy
    Lydia Adler Okrent, Performer/Designer

    Lydia Adler Okrent’s collection of neckwear entitled ‘Dirty Danny’ reeks a special blend of Sculpey, leather, paper and rubber tubing (some of Okrent’s accessory making materials). The range is inspired by a 2007 article in Butt magazine chronicling the uncouth life of an Amsterdam homo hobo. Okrent refers to her work as ‘neckwear’ and makes a new piece to wear herself or give to a friend nearly everyday.

  21. 04.22.13
    Sight Unseen Presents
    The BYCO Design Contest

    When we first started writing about design nearly a decade ago, almost all young furniture talents had the same starry eyed aim: to get a piece produced by a big European company like Cappellini, then sit back and watch the 3% royalties trickle in. My how things have changed. These days emerging designers are just as likely to produce their own work and sell it online, cutting out the middle man and relying on press, exhibitions, and social media to get the word out. And for those who would rather operate somewhere in the middle, now there’s also BYCO, a new micro-financing site for fashion and housewares designers who are motivated enough to promote their own ideas but wouldn’t mind having someone else deal with the logistics of production. Founded by Jesse Finkelstein of JF & Son and his sister Meredith, the site lets you submit a design, then promote it to potential funders to cover the costs of making a prototype. If you’re successful, your design is sold on the site for a month, with BYCO handling production and fulfillment and your funders getting a nice little discount to the shop. As a designer, you receive 20% of sales and one of your pieces for free (or 30% if you cover the sampling cost). Starting today, Sight Unseen has teamed up with BYCO to sweeten the pot even further — submit your own design to the site by Monday, June 3, and we’ll pick the best three submissions to bypass the funding stage and go straight into production on the site. Just follow the directions below to get started! Just follow the directions after the jump to get started!

  22. 03.08.13
    Eye Candy
    The Design Center, Philadelphia

    Swatch out! The Design Center at Philadelphia University houses over 200,000 textiles and fashion objects. A sliver of this massive archive is now available for all to see via The Design Center tumblr. It’s striking how contemporary many of these prints look, the designs from the late 1880s are often the most eccentric/in vogue. Take a look at these selections, featuring prints of many styles and eras, along with Dorothy Liebes and Jack Lerner Larson wovens.

  23. 03.06.13
    Sighted
    10A Trousers Launches a Women’s Collection

    The story of how we were introduced to the 10A Trouser and Suspender Company is one of our all-time favorites…

  24. 03.01.13
    Eye Candy
    Building Block + Waka Waka at Iko Iko

    A star power trio of Sight Unseen favorites come together as one: Iko Iko presents the collaboration of handbag designers Building Block and furniture makers Waka Waka, who have united to produce a limited edition of custom-order bags and more. Together they explore “how time and use can bring a new personality to the things we wear.”

  25. 01.28.13
    Sighted
    New Places Necklaces by Karin Johansson

    Don’t get your hopes up — you won’t find Karin Johansson’s necklaces in the Sight Unseen shop anytime soon, or at any other shop for that matter. Johansson isn’t a fashion designer, after all, but a Sweden-based jewelry artist who’s spent nearly two decades learning and refining her metalworking techniques, and her pieces are only available through high-end galleries like Barcelona’s Klimt02. That’s where we spotted the New Places collection, a colorfully graphic amalgam of handmade elements in enamel, plastic, and precious metals, plus crushed and “reconstructed” stone; Johansson based each necklace on a different photograph she’d taken while traveling inside her own city and beyond. “The inspiration and the starting point for New Places were photos I’d collected for a few years of different views, landscapes, and cities,” Johansson explains. “Simply by drawing a line in the picture and connecting the ends, then picking up the colors, I discovered a necklace giving hints of houses, streets, trees, water, sky, lines, and directions.”

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