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Visiting Brian Rideout’s New Show Is Like Walking Into One of His Paintings

Canadian artist Brian Rideout's paintings are inspired by amazing art-filled vintage interiors he finds in old magazines and DIY books, and at his new show, they're installed in a very unique, very meta way: with period-appropriate paintings by Al Held, Fernand Leduc, and Guido Molinari sprinkled in between them, and a "living room" full of vintage furniture placed in the middle of the room, so that the gallery effectively becomes a 3-D representation of the spaces depicted in his canvases.
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When Paintings Become Sculptures: Jaime Keiter’s Frank Stella–Inspired Ceramics

When Jaime Keiter made a move to Atlanta last year, she decided it was time focus on her artwork, which included a series of simple, geometric pencil drawings on paper. “Moving to a new place gave me a new perspective on life, and I had less pressure to make art that was formulaic,” explains Keiter. After a friend suggested they join a ceramic studio on a whim, Keiter’s vision for her one-of-a-kind ceramic sculptures became fully formed. “I had been thinking of a way to make paintings that are unexpected — in a medium other than paper and wood. In the ceramics studio, it all sort of clicked."
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Brian Rideout Makes Art For Design Lovers

Brian Rideout's American Collection Paintings are meant to transform the interiors images he finds in old decorating books and magazines into archival records of time and place: “A contemporary reference to the Flemish collection paintings of the early 17th century, American Collection Paintings … aims to reorient these glossy commercial examples into historical documents,” he says.
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Nationale Portland gallery

This Portland Gallery Has Shown Only Female Artists Since the Beginning of 2017

Nationale is an art gallery in Portland, Oregon that represents eight emerging artists: four male, and four female. But since the beginning of 2017, the gallery has shown three female artists in quick succession — Amy Bernstein, a painter; Francesca Capone, a textile artist; and Emily Counts, a sculptor; whose work is everything we look for in a Sight Unseen subject — colorful, multidisciplinary, and meaningful. And while directors May Barruel and Gabi Lewton-Leopold swear that the suddenly gendered roster wasn't purposeful, it certainly feels refreshing in the current climate.
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30 Artists and Galleries We Loved During New York Art Week 2017

We can't quite put our finger on what it was that made this year's Armory Arts Week feel so fresh. Was it the new venues? After all, NADA moved from Basketball City to Skylight Clarkson North, while Spring/Break moved from the old Post Office to an ex-Condé Nast office at 4 Times Square. Was it the fresh blood — the fact that NADA was even there at all, after years of coinciding with May's Frieze Fair? Or maybe it was simply the weather — we made the rounds on a gorgeously sunny Thursday that made the views at Spring Studios' Independent fair even more glorious. Whatever the case, we found much to love
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Scot Heywood

A Master of Perceptual Motion, Inspired by Mondrian

In his bold-colored and paneled paintings, textured by a variety of brushstrokes, Los Angeles artist Scot Heywood finds ways to generate perceptual movement and subtle energy. His exhibition of recent paintings, called “Scot Heywood: Shift ǀ Stack ǀ Sunyata,” are on view through the end of February at Peter Blake Gallery in Laguna Beach, conjuring parallels to the geometric styles of Piet Mondrian.
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Week of February 6, 2017

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: Some of our favorite interiors in recent memory, featuring Japanese-inspired minimalism, rattan-covered walls, abstract art, '70s-style couches, and a trompe l'oeil staircase to nowhere.
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Abstract Geometric Paintings That Fold, Like Origami, Into Three Dimensions

On view at The Hole now, "Fourteen Paintings" is the first New York solo show for Louisiana-born, Los Angeles–based artist Robert Moreland, who in fact creates work that exists more in the space between painting and sculpture — three-dimensional canvases made from drop-cloths, tacks, leather hinges, and acrylic paint, that are hardly paintings at all but rather painted objects that explore how line and color can be disrupted by volume.
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Sunset-Inspired Color Fades Meet Slabs of Marble In This Stunning Paris Exhibition

The Belgian painter Pieter Vermeersch has been known to fill rooms with soft, colorful gradients that define architectural space in beautifully strange ways, bordering on optical illusion. Both those works and his new canvases, on view now at Galerie Perrotin, dovetail with Vermeersch's professional origins in photography in the way they deal with light and perspective — but the new works physically ground all that ethereal color with panels of heavy marble.
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At 83, Vasa — and His Famed Acrylic Sculptures — Are Still On Top of the LA Art World

When our friend and sometime contributor Robin Stein emailed us to reveal that Los Angeles artist — and longtime SU obsession — Vasa Mihich was an old family friend, and ask if we might be interested in shooting his Los Angeles studio and archives, we jumped at the chance. What Stein's photos reveal is something that we, who often focus on design's newest and youngest practitioners, rarely have access to: a portrait of an octogenarian artist, still producing at a rapid clip, at the height of his career and his potential; a maker clearly in love with both his materials and his process.
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