Tag Archives: photography

  1. 06.30.15
    Invitation
    Q+Q’s 2015 Collection, Shot by Amanda Ringstad

    When we first invited one of our favorite prop stylists, Seattle’s Amanda Ringstad, to create a shoot around Q+Q’s line of waterproof, solar-powered watches last year, she attempted to abstract the simple, color-blocked designs into ambiguous shapes and arrangements. For its 2015 collection, however, the Japanese brand — who partnered with us for a second time at this year’s Sight Unseen OFFSITE — went wild with pattern, so we thought it would be especially compelling to return to Ringstad once again and see how that might change her aesthetic approach. The result is a series of playful, summery images shot inside a big bucket of water that imagine the watches as eye-catchingly outfitted, anthropomorphized bathers.

  2. 06.11.15
    Self Portrait
    Wintercheck Factory’s Collection No. 300

    When we asked Brooklyn’s Wintercheck Factory — who debuted their latest collection with us at Sight Unseen OFFSITE last month — to shoot those new pieces in the most appropriate scenario they could imagine for our Self Portrait column, their choice of venues ended up being even more fitting than they themselves realized. The 1910 bank building in Bed-Stuy that’s pictured above is about to become the duo’s new studio, and clearly it makes for a stunning backdrop, but having been ripped up, painted, retiled, left to rot, bricked up, and, now, appropriated as a creative space, it can also be read as a symbol of Wintercheck Factory’s own gradual reinvention.

  3. 05.15.15
    The Making Of
    The Dynamic Sanctuary at Sight Unseen OFFSITE

    Sight Unseen OFFSITE opens today, and front and center at this year’s show is an undulating structure that, from a distance, looks incredibly mysterious — its walls are made from an unusual material, and they periodically emit a strange, pulsing blue glow. As you approach the structure, you first pass through a very narrow entryway that obscures your view of what’s inside, but once you arrive there — well, that’s the magic of the Dynamic Sanctuary, an installation by the Brooklyn design studio The Principals that’s a kind of poetic metaphor for the design ideas behind Ford’s 2015 Edge vehicle.

  4. 05.04.15
    Up and Coming
    Kate Jackling, photographer

    We first came across the work of UK photographer Kate Jackling through a collaboration with COS that was endlessly re-pinned a few months back. That campaign — with its clothes draped over pink, yellow, and blue geometric forms — was so good that we had to know more about the photographer responsible for styling such a fun and playful set. Once we came across her website, we knew we’d hit the jackpot. Jackling’s photos are clean, playing with shadows and reflections to elevate product photography into something more artistic — photos that sell the product, yet also sell Jackling herself as someone who clearly understands her craft.

  5. 04.25.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of April 20, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: Three particularly timely design objects that launched in Milan, one peculiar woven-glass lamp that didn’t, and a show by the design world’s most beloved artist, Carol Bove, pictured above.

  6. 04.21.15
    Sighted
    Thévoz-Choquet’s New Marble Accessories Collection For Bloc Studios

    Over four days spent in Milan last week at the annual furniture fair, we saw dozens of exhibitions, spent 9 hours at the fairgrounds, and shot more than 800 photos. Pretty overwhelming. While we take a moment to regroup and put together our official coverage, which starts tomorrow, we figured we’d share with you one of the few projects that we didn’t photograph in Milan, but didn’t need to — SU alums Josephine Choquet and Virgil Thévoz launched an extensive new collection of marble tables and housewares with the Italian marble producer Bloc Studios, and thanks to the duo’s superior art directing skills, it came complete with the perfectly styled set of images you’ll see after the jump.

  7. 04.18.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of April 13, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: While the international design community (including Jill and Monica) convened in Milan for the Salone del Mobile, we put Ryland on the case to round up a few of his favorite finds, ranging from the dark, moody objects of Blackman Cruz at Wright (pictured above) to a Technicolor Instagram account involving pool noodles and sneakers.

  8. 04.04.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of March 30, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week was all about designers doing mesmerizing things with very simple shapes: from Nendo’s new color-gradient cube tables to a series of interactive geometric projections to the London grad who’s pushing the boundaries of jewelry with his mixed-material compositions (pictured).

  9. 03.24.15
    Eye Candy
    B-FIT Assemblage by Fact Non Fact

    B-FIT, a project by the Seoul-based design collective Fact Non Fact, is the very definition of eye candy — the geometric shapes it comprises are meant not to function in specific ways, but merely to look pretty and highlight the materials they’re made from, which include iron, brass, plaster, terra cotta, marble, wood, glass and concrete. If “A-FIT,” according to Fact Non Fact, refers to all the objects in our lives that are optimized for specific functions, like chairs or door handles, “B-FIT” refers to the kinds of objects that aren’t. After making the pieces, designers Jinsik Kim, Yuhun Kim, and Eunjae Lee brought them to life in three ways: as a physical installation, as a conceptual deskscape, and as the Assemblage images you see here.

  10. 03.21.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of March 16, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a Bahamian ceramics wunderkind Instagrams her way into our hearts, a group design show makes us wish we lived in Saint-Étienne, and two Greek designers kill it with the most beautiful house (above) and choker necklace we’ve seen in recent memory.

  11. 03.20.15
    Eye Candy
    Roxana Azar, photographer

    We’ve been familiar with Philadelphia-based photographer Roxana Azar’s work for some time now. Last summer, she took the snaps for our story on fellow Philadelphian Page Neal of Bario-Neal (where Azar also works), and she’s the one responsible for the awesome images of the Jessica Hans / Bario-Neal earrings that often appear in our ad spot at the top of this page. But the second she sent us the latest personal series she’s been working on, we knew we had to share — especially on a day like today, when we can only dream that spring might be around the corner. Azar digitally manipulates her photos to make them almost painterly or collage-like, but in the series we’re sharing today, many of the images began as photographs from gardens where Azar spent her childhood. “I am really interested in using the photograph as a starting point to layer, erase, rebuild, and obscure an image, turning the image into something ambiguous yet playful,” Azar says. “Ranging between chaotic clusters of poppies, fruit trees in limbo between positive and negative space, and colorful ecliptic spheres obscuring cactus pears and palms, I focus on gardens from my childhood and those I have newly explored.” Scroll down for more beautiful images and then keep tabs on Azar’s Tumblr for new work coming down the pipeline.

  12. 03.14.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of March 9, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: Three different projects that push the boundaries of glass, one photograph that suspends your belief in reality, and two books that subvert your expectations of what a book can do or be.

  13. 03.07.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of March 1, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A glimpse into the past (the three-year-old side table, pictured above, we can’t believe we overlooked), present (six can’t-miss art exhibitions happening now), and future (four pieces launching in Milan next month).

  14. 03.05.15
    Eye Candy
    Still Lifes by Belgian Photographer Frederik Vercruysse

    Still life photography is having a big week on Sight Unseen — yesterday we featured a pair of stylists who built their reputation on it and are now moving into interiors, and today we’re highlighting a photographer who approaches shooting interiors just as though they were still lifes. Belgian-born talent Frederik Vercruysse, in fact, describes his entire body of work as “still life photography in the broadest sense of the word,” according to his website, applying the approach not just to interiors but to portraits, fashion shows, and the occasional landscape as well (for clients like Wallpaper magazine, Sophie Buhai, and Muller Van Severen). But then, of course, there are his actual still lifes, which we’ve decided to focus on here. Shot mostly for magazines, they represent the purest form of his aim “to photograph the subject in its purest form.”

  15. 02.27.15
    Sighted
    Tekla Evelina Severin on the Urban Outfitters Blog

    At last year’s Milan Furniture Fair, we had an extremely rare — but kind of major — fangirl moment. It wasn’t in response to some big-name Bouroullec-type designer with an installation around town or even Anna Della Russo, who you sometimes see flitting from party to party. It was a Swedish interior architect and photographer named Tekla Evelina Severin — better known on Instagram as Teklan — who we met on a lazy afternoon while exploring Venture Lambrate. Severin has hands down one of the most beautiful Instagrams around, so we were insanely excited to meet her, and even happier when this beauty of a story popped up on Urban Outfitters’ blog earlier this month. On the occasion of Valentine’s Day, Urban asked Severin to provide them with a series of pink photos that said something about the way she sees the world; of her addictive feed, she says, it’s “65 percent impromptu and 35 percent planned. Often it’s just things I notice as I pass them or when I’m traveling. Or sometimes it’s a place I’ve seen and not been able to get over.” Read on for a selection of our favorite images from the story, then click through for even more photos and an interview with the designer. (And if you don’t, follow her on Instagram already, will ya?!)

  16. 02.25.15
    Excerpt: Exhibition
    Barbara Kasten at the ICA Philadelphia

    If Barbara Kasten’s colorful, angular compositions look as though they could have been arranged just last week by some prop stylist in Los Angeles — well, consider that a testament to Kasten’s massive, if massively underappreciated, influence. The Chicago-based artist and photographer is currently the subject of a long overdue solo exhibition at Philadelphia’s Institute of Contemporary Art; Stages spans five decades of work, from fiber sculptures to cyanotype prints to set design to a brand-new, site-specific installation that plays beautifully with the ICA’s interior architecture. For us, though, the exhibition’s highlight is the 1980s-era Constructs series, for which Kasten photographed theatrical assemblages incorporating elements such as metal, wire, mesh, mirrors — not to mention life-sized squiggles, cones, triangles, and columns made from plaster or wood. Constructs blurred the line between object and image and set the stage for nearly every photo shoot you see on blogs like this one today. Kasten was influenced by the Bauhaus, California Light and Space, and Postmodernism, and the program for her exhibition includes a conversation between Peter Shire and Martino Gamper. Considering the previous sentence includes five of our favorite things, you’ll know where to find us come March 25: on the next train to Philly.

  17. 02.21.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of February 16, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: two new designs by American Design Hot List alums, a solo show by a master of Mono-ha, and various accoutrements for the chicest breakfast table ever, including marble egg cups and this epic speckled pitcher by BTW Ceramics.

  18. 02.19.15
    Invitation
    The Hollyhock House Shot by Gaea Woods

    If you’d happened to wander into L.A.’s Barnsdall Art Park in the middle of the night last Friday, you might have assumed there were concert tickets, or some newfangled iPhone model, about to go on sale the next morning: even into the wee hours, a line of people three hours long snaked all around the property. Amazingly enough, though, the massive crowd had turned out not to buy something but to experience the re-opening of Frank Lloyd Wright’s landmark 1921 Hollyhock House, which we overheard certain over-caffeinated line-goers describe as “super hyped.” Built in 1921 in the so-called California Romanza style, the theater and home turned museum had been closed to the public for more than three years for restoration, and the city was celebrating the unveiling of its face-lift by giving the public continuous free access for 24 hours. We figured the best way to mark the occasion was to send a photographer to shoot the house after dark, a task we entrusted to the up-and-coming L.A. photographer Gaea Woods.

  19. 02.09.15
    Excerpt: Exhibition
    Doty/Glasco at CES Gallery

    We had never heard of the photography husband-and-wife team of JR Doty and Joe Glasco — or the LA gallery CES — before this exhibition announcement arrived in our inbox today, but as soon as we saw the photos we were hooked. The two photographers began collaborating professionally back in 2013, and their current work draws from an archive of more than 40,000 images that were taken on a road trip across America over the last year. Doty and Glasco photographed specific locations, like Utah and California, because of their unique geological conditions. “The images represent the essence of nature with an emphasis on the phenomena of time as it affects the landscape’s topography, such as rippling water, striations of marble and the constant changing of landforms,” the press release reads.

  20. 01.29.15
    Eye Candy
    Elizabeth Atterbury, Artist

    While the Maine-based artist Elizabeth Atterbury has done amazing things with just simple shapes cut into paper and steel, lately she’s been getting a wee bit more ambitious — building a 3-by-4-foot sandbox in her studio and photographing compositions she’s raked into it, or using a bandsaw to carve grill bricks into arcs and zigzags then documenting the crumbly results. Aside from photography — which she studied in school — she also exhibits sculptures in clay and painted wood. You can see them in person now through May 10 at Colby College Art Museum in Waterville, Maine, or pick up a copy of Atterbury’s 2013 book with Bodega gallery, “In the Middle, an Oasis.”

  21. 01.22.15
    Self Portrait
    Recreation Center’s Ceramics

    There’s a kind of genius in the way that Josephine Heilpern runs her ceramics studio, Recreation Center. Maybe not in the fact that she does everything — from designing to fabricating to filling orders — 100% on her own, with no help, running herself perpetually (yet gleefully) ragged, but more in how she knows exactly when to keep things simple versus when to let her imagination run wild. In the three years since she’s been making the mugs, lamps, and mobiles we’ve been fortunate enough to stock in our online shop, she’s barely changed her design formula, hewing to basic shapes and consistent patterns that resist becoming tiresome with daily use, yet on her site and her popular Instagram feed, she markets those objects with all the visual pizzazz of a 28-year-old raised on internet culture. When we invited her to shoot some of her creations exclusively for Sight Unseen, she turned up the styling charm, busting out the dollar-store props and studio scraps to bring her aesthetic vision to life.

  22. 01.21.15
    Up and Coming
    Daniel Everett, photographer

    Utah-based artist Daniel Everett has a BFA in photography from Brigham Young and a master’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. But it may have been what happened between his two degrees that had the biggest impact on Everett’s career. “I’d done an internship as part of my undergraduate degree with Edward Burtynsky, and after I finished my undergrad, I traveled with him for just over a year,” Everett remembers. “If you know his work, Burtynsky photographs, like, manmade manipulations of the landscape: the largest open-pit copper mine, or the largest oil field. We were always traveling to some superlative location — the biggest, the widest, the greatest — and I got really interested in the in-between places that we passed through: the nondescript, transitory spaces like subway systems, airports, parking garages, and hotels. Spaces that are meant to be legible regardless of the language, and where the aesthetics are governed by function.”

  23. 01.17.15
    Saturday Selects
    Week of January 12, 2015

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week was all about material experiments: ping-pong paddles in Plexi or wood, a yoga-ball holder built from inflated concrete and pigment, and furniture made from the remnants of an imaginary construction site.

  24. 12.17.14
    Up and Coming
    Los Angeles art director Sarah Kissell, aka Pure Magenta

    It can be easy to become immune to the Postmodern references and patterns currently littering the digital ether, but there’s something different about Sarah Kissell, the Los Angeles–based designer behind the graphically-fitting guise Pure Magenta. As she describes it, it’s the simultaneous practice of excess and restraint — especially while exploring questionable taste — that Kissell values the most. “Riding the line between the two is when things become interesting to me,” she says. “It also widens the opportunity to succeed or fail, which is a healthy place to be a young designer.” And healthy is exactly where the designer is right now, dividing her time as senior art director for the terminally trendy fashion retailer Nasty Gal, as well as developing Pure Magenta’s graphic identity and soon-to-launch jewelry line.

  25. 12.15.14
    Excerpt: Book
    Down the Long Driveway, You’ll See It

    There’s nothing we love better than when our very talented, creative friends introduce us to their very talented, creative friends, and this week didn’t disappoint: In our inboxes arrived the most beautiful submission from Mary Gaudin, a New Zealand photographer living in Montpellier, France, who was introduced to us through Brian Ferry, one of Sight Unseen’s contributors and a wonderful photographer in his own right. Gaudin recently published a book on modernist New Zealand homes in collaboration Matthew Arnold of Sons & Co called Down the Long Driveway, You’ll See It; the title is a quote from one of the book’s subjects, upon giving directions to his home. The book documents 14 homes built between 1950 and 1974, and it’s a revelation not only for the beautiful way in which it’s photographed but for the peek it gives into New Zealand’s architectural history.

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