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Our Go-To Destination for Accessible, Scandinavian-Inspired Design Just Popped Up in NYC

America has a furniture problem: If you are young, aesthetically minded, and upwardly mobile but not quite rich, where do you buy your furniture? When you're looking for something with more staying power than Urban Outfitters, a greater cool factor than CB2, and less ubiquitous than West Elm, where do you turn? For the last few years, whenever we've been asked that question (which is, to be honest, all the damn time), we've answered: Have you heard of Hem?
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Meet the Designers Behind Peter Pilotto’s Jaw-Dropping Townhouse Takeover

We've almost never met an immersive design environment we didn't like, but Peter Pilotto's takeover of a Victorian townhouse in Brompton during last week's London Design Festival was something else entirely. Located at 3 Cromwell Place and on view until October 15, the immensely inspiring interior is painted in shades of peach, mint green, and Monica-from-Friends purple and outfitted with a riot of collaborative wares from friends of the designer.
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Sight Unseen x Bower for 29Rooms

We Outfitted Fashion Week’s Coolest Pop-Up With This Painted-Plywood Furniture

Refinery29's 29Rooms event is basically a funhouse of art and culture, where each room presents its own mega-Instagrammable moment. But what if you need a teeny tiny break from all that selfie-ing? That's where we came in. When Refinery asked Sight Unseen to curate the 29Rooms lounge area, we turned immediately to Bower, who came back at us just a few hours later with a sketch for this amazing collection.
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Last, a New Swedish Design Trio

No pun intended, but we had to share one last find from this month’s Stockholm Design Week: Last, a new arena for selling one-of-a-kind products by Swedish design trio Åsa Jungnelius, Gustaf Nordenskiöld, and Fredrik Paulsen. They are, respectively, a glass designer working with glass, a potter with clay and a furniture designer with wood. All share a common desire for not only producing sustainable products, but also to promote a kind of design that is slower, more considered, and intended to stand the test of time (i.e. the last spoon you might ever buy).
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Behind Flamingo Plaza, by The Perfect Nothing Catalog

Since it opened in the summer of 2012, Frank Traynor’s Perfect Nothing Catalog — an ice shack–turned-shop that its owner transplanted from upstate New York to Brooklyn — has already relocated twice: from its original home in a Greenpoint garden to the backyard of a gallery in Bushwick, and, very briefly this summer, to a subway platform in Williamsburg. That particular pitstop, set up outside a more permanent subway retail outlet called The Newsstand, was a show called Behind Flamingo Plaza. “It was named after my high-school hangout, an all thrift-store strip mall in Miami — a very formative space for my aesthetic and a vibe I wanted to honor,” explains Traynor.
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A reprieve for those of us who faced down a sad void when Iko Iko closed last month: the inspirational retailer is back for Arts ReSTORE, introducing their signature mix of Japanese picks and one-of-a-kind functional art pieces to Westside audiences. Items on table include silver keep-cold lunch bags, a corn fiber broom, handwoven fabric scrap slippers and sanyaso bashi ceramic planters “for casual plants.”

Hammer Museum’s Arts ReSTORE

For all of the handwringing about art being inaccessible, there’s no city planning theory that has gained more traction in this century than the idea of creative people driving neighborhood revitalization. Which means that the descriptively titled “Arts ReSTORE: LA” project isn’t just loftily ambitious. The month-long residency program, which began last week, might actually work at creating a less sterile West Los Angeles, not least because it is supported by the powerhouse Hammer Museum, whose three-story compound anchors one end of the street. On a stretch of Westwood Ave., better known for chain sandwich shops and fluorescent interiors, the Hammer offered a half-dozen empty storefronts to local artists and makers, with the idea that even a temporary infusion would upend the retail mood of the area. If the packed opening night was any indication, this time the theory holds. Here’s what we saw.
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