Nationale Portland gallery

This Portland Gallery Has Shown Only Female Artists Since the Beginning of 2017

Nationale is an art gallery in Portland, Oregon that represents eight emerging artists: four male, and four female. But since the beginning of 2017, the gallery has shown three female artists in quick succession — Amy Bernstein, a painter; Francesca Capone, a textile artist; and Emily Counts, a sculptor; whose work is everything we look for in a Sight Unseen subject — colorful, multidisciplinary, and meaningful. And while directors May Barruel and Gabi Lewton-Leopold swear that the suddenly gendered roster wasn't purposeful, it certainly feels refreshing in the current climate.
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Win $500 Worth of Colorful Design Objects From Woonwinkel!

The founders of the Portland home-design store Woonwinkel embrace vibrant color as a way to set themselves apart from the city's earthy, norm-core neutrals. To celebrate their new "Color Your Life" campaign, they shot three color-trend vignettes for Sight Unseen — '80s Desert, Warm Metallics, and Bold Pattern — and are offering our readers the chance to get the look with a $500 gift certificate. Click through to enter!
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Portland Artist Drew Tyndell

Portland-based Drew Tyndell is the creative director of his own studio, Computer Team, which specializes in 2D hand-drawn and stop-motion animations. But he’s also an accomplished artist in the more traditional sense of the word, and his most recent project is a commissioned mural for Dolby’s new headquarters in San Francisco.
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Mattes makes the slices to order — “you can tell me what toppings you want” — and jokes about creating a webshop “that’s almost like the Domino’s Tracker, where people can see what state their pizza’s in.” She plans to keep making them, but she’s also “interested in creating some other small-scale object weavings that aren’t necessarily pizza.”

Portland Textile Artist Kayla Mattes

Kayla Mattes’ tapestries are an antidote to the disconnection and depersonalization that spending hours online can sometimes leave you feeling. Her work is plugged in to all the technology we take for granted but she recontextualizes it, slows it down, and the effect is immersive, dizzying, a little chaotic, and oddly comforting.
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The New Frontier at Bellevue Arts Museum

When we were first introduced to the multi-talented photographer Charlie Schuck, a good three years ago, he was running the heart-stoppingly chic concept store Object in Seattle, at which he paired things like Masanori Oji trivets with pieces he commissioned from local studios like Iacoli & McAllister and Grain. It was the first, most beautifully executed sign that a larger narrative was galvanizing around Pacific Northwest designers — one that reaches its apex this month with a museum show Schuck has curated for the Bellevue Arts Museum in Bellevue, Washington.
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Matthew Philip Williams, Furniture Designer

The first work we ever knew from Portland, Oregon–based furniture designer Matthew Philip Williams was a collection he calls The Step-Family. The pieces, which were designed individually but at the same time, include a pinchpot mug in Yves Klein blue, a laminate and maple bench, and a steel and Douglas fir coat rack. The items are so aggressively functional — and make use of such logical and simple material choices — that you would never guess that Williams’s first inclination was to be a fine artist.
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RillRill’s Marble Necklaces, New In the Sight Unseen Shop

The world lost a future ad exec the day Katie Freedle started her jewelry line, RillRill, back in 2010, but it gained a tireless creative entrepreneur. Freedle studied journalism, business, and advertising as an undergrad at the University of Oregon, but her interests were already drifting elsewhere: "They wouldn't let non-art majors take metal-smithing back then, so I started studying jewelry post-college," the Portland native recalls. "I didn't want to become part of the cultish advertising life." RillRill became a platform for her experimentation with materials — "I like to put many random things in front of me and experiment with all of the options," she says — and Backtalk, the shop she opened two years later, became her venue for showcasing not just her own designs but those of 30 others, all of whom are no doubt as glad as we are that she turned her back on Madison Ave. We've just added three of Freedle's striking marble and copper statement necklaces to the Sight Unseen Shop — check out more images after the jump, or click here to snag one for yourself!
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Staycation: A Home Collection by Eric Trine and Will Bryant

Staycation, a collaborative home collection by Eric Trine and Will Bryant is a delightfully chill and a pleasantly patterned pairing of housewares. A chair, a lamp, a table—everyday utilitarian pieces transformed by Trine and Bryant to unwind your mind. Sit back, relax–it's a staycation. See it now until December 1 at SuperMaker in Portland Oregon. All pieces are available for sale, contact etrine@gmail.com.
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What inspired your Pink/Frequency series? “That title came in a dream. After I woke up I looked it up, and it turns out to be a certain frequency of sound. I was looking at the internet a lot at that time, tumblr and image-based sites mostly. I work intuitively and have learned through experience that form follows feeling. My work from this series is how I came to know that experientially. I was feeling things around the object/image relationship, and I was also interested in art/objects that related to the everyday experience of being. I felt the real art was the art of living.”

Jason Rens, Furniture Designer

Jason Rens’s future as a designer pretty much began — though unbeknownst to him at the time — the day his grandpa bought him a Taliesin West t-shirt. Rens was still a kid growing up in Arizona, and his grandpa, Al Farnsworth, was an architect who liked to make pilgrimages to Frank Lloyd Wright’s famed winter home each time he came to visit. When Rens grew up and graduated high school, he worked at a clothing company slash record label for awhile, but then a random job at a design/build company activated some long-dormant impulse buried inside him: I want to be an architect, too. He made it halfway through architecture school in Boulder before shifting gears and finishing his degree in crafts in Portland, where he’s now known for both his interiors and, increasingly, his Rason Jens line of sculptural objects.
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Alley-Oop by Will Bryant and Eric Trine at Poketo

Before the show Alley-Oop opens at L.A.'s Poketo store this coming Saturday, you should take a moment to thoroughly examine the portfolios of its two Portland-based collaborators, illustrator Will Bryant and furniture designer Eric Trine. Because think about it: How easy is it to picture the results of a collaboration spanning the two disciplines? Especially when Bryant's work is so crazy vibrant — full of squiggles and anthropomorphized hot dogs wearing neon sunglasses — and Trine's is so very understated, albeit with a lot of cool geometries in the mix. Alley-Oop is like one of those software programs that lets you crudely merge the faces of two people to find out what their child might look like at age 5, though perhaps a better metaphor would be that it's like what would happen if you pumped two designers full of methamphetamine and locked them in a room together for 48 hours with nothing but some spray paint and a welding gun. Actually, that's not too far off from how Bryant and Trine describe it themselves. See our interview with the pair after the jump, along with the first preview images of their collaborative work — which hopefully won't be the last.
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