Tag Archives: retail

  1. 08.14.14
    Sighted
    Fruits of Labor by Bethan Laura Wood

    Sighted this week on Pin-Up magazine’s website, making-of images from the latest project of London talent Bethan Laura Wood, a series of summer window displays for Hermès UK called “Fruits of Labor.” Pin-Up’s editors call the project, which consists of classical still lifes full of oversized fruits and vegetables, “Henry Rousseau in 3-D.” Says Wood of the project: “I really wanted these large-scale sets to be hand-painted in order to highlight the layers handcrafted at every stage that make up final Hermès products.”

  2. 08.12.14
    Q+A
    Jamie Wolfond of Good Thing

    When we’re asked by other journalists to talk about the evolution of American design, we pretty much always point to the same thing: the rise of independent designers and studios producing and selling their own work. Young American designers have increasingly become entrepreneurs in the past ten years, leveraging local manufacturing resources and online shopping platforms in order to bypass the need to wait around for big brands to do it for them. The latest such endeavor is Good Thing, a new company founded by designer Jamie Wolfond and based in New York that launches next week at NY NOW. Good Thing’s first collection consists of nine products by six different designers, from a sand-cast aluminum trivet to a coiled-plastic vase to a handmade clay mug. We spoke to Wolfond about the new venture and how he’s making it work.

  3. 07.19.14
    Saturday Selects
    Week of July 14, 2014

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: experimental materials made from chalk and coal (above), a new Book/Shop annex in New York, and our first-ever radio show interview, with Design Sponge’s Grace Bonney.

  4. 07.17.14
    Shop
    New For Summer: Grids and Geometrics!

    Okay, so we’ve always had a thing for grids and geometrics in the Sight Unseen Shop, it’s true. But when we thought about which new pieces to release in advance of a *huge* shop update we’re currently prepping for the fall — one that will be full of painterly ceramics, color-washed concrete, and cool, polished metals — the playfully patterned items you see here just seemed especially right for summer. They’re by three designers working in three very different materials — Dana Haim in ceramics, Assembly in PVC, and RillRill in marble — and they all share the most Sight Unseen-y characteristic of all: being handmade in small batches by folks whose creativity knows no bounds. What better excuse for a summer splurge?

  5. 07.11.14
    Eye Candy
    Studio Uribe’s FW14 Collection

    We spotted the new London-based jewelry designers Studio Uribe on the shelves of one of our favorite boutiques, Hunting and Collecting in Brussels. Helmed by couple Sion and Tiffany Phillips, the brand recently launched its first collection for FW14, which pairs sleek 18K gold-plated brass with abstract striped-enamel and lapis lazuli accents. The pair say that their collaboration reflects their contrasting backgrounds — Sion being a Welsh branding veteran who’s worked with clients like Nike and BMW, and Tiffany being a Chilean-American accessories designer with Chanel, Kenzo, and Swarovski on her resume. After the jump are selections from their first lookbook, shot by Rosie Blake, as well as images from a special shoot Uribe did with Bella Howard, of the pieces placed alongside various plants.

  6. 07.07.14
    Eye Candy
    Kristina Krogh, Artist and Graphic Designer

    Kristina Krogh studied graphic design before setting up her own studio in Copenhagen in 2012, where she spends part of her time on freelance design projects and the rest on her extensive line of limited-edition art prints, notebooks, and notecards, pictured in this post. Her layered geometric compositions feature a mix of contrasting and complementary surface textures taken from everyday materials like marble, ply, wood, cork, and paper. “My inspiration comes from the things that surround me: a beautiful old parquet, a perfect color combination on a building, a stone floor in a church, a bike ride through Copenhagen,” she says.

  7. 06.28.14
    Saturday Selects
    Week of June 23, 2014

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week we indulge our inner shopaholics with a new Norwegian emerging-design purveyor, three designer pop-ups in New York and LA, and a mini online shopping guide that includes a little something for the guys, too — chic Op-Art pocket squares.

  8. 06.20.14
    Invitation
    Q+Q Watches Shot By Amanda Ringstad

    When Amanda Ringstad showed a friend recently one of the images she’d styled and shot for us of a cluster of Q+Q SmileSolar watches, all linked together in a random shape, her friend’s first reaction was: “That looks like a lawnmower!” Ringstad was thoroughly pleased — having been invited by us to apply her styling genius in the service of our friends at Q+Q, who partnered with us on this year’s edition of Sight Unseen OFFSITE, the Seattle photographer’s main objective was to present the watches in a simple, abstracted way that left plenty of room for the imagination. “Watches are a simple thing, but difficult to disassociate so that they convey something else,” she explains. After initial attempts to weave them together into a kind of “textile,” or arrange them on top of summery backgrounds depicting water or sand, in the end Ringstad used spare colored planes and graphic shadows to elevate her subjects above the realm of mere utilitarian objects.

  9. 06.16.14
    8 Things
    COS’s 50 Things From America Project

    Each spring when we head to Milan, there are two must-see stops on our agenda that aren’t strictly part of the furniture fair circuit. The first is lunch at the no-frills Latteria, where we gorge ourselves on raw artichokes and lemony pasta with chili peppers. The second is the COS flagship on Corso Venezia, where we’ve been known to spend hours stocking up on the kind of simple, directional wardrobe staples that are the London-based brand’s bread and butter. For years, COS has been the secret weapon of pretty much every design-world tastemaker we know, and it’s become an excellent source as well for keeping up with what’s new in art and design, what with its print magazine from the people behind Fantastic Man and its blog highlighting work by talents like Chen Chen & Kai Williams, Charlie Schuck, and Julian Renault. When we heard COS was finally coming to America — stores in New York and L.A. are forthcoming this fall, and an e-commerce site is already up and running — we were thrilled. To celebrate the launch in its inimitable fashion, COS recently launched a project called “50 Things: A Collection of Things We Love From America,” which includes a mix of Sight Unseen regulars (Bec Brittain, Doug Johnston), amazing new discoveries (we’re obsessing over Utah’s Daniel Everett), and odes to some of the country’s most beautiful examples of architecture and natural phenomena.

  10. 06.09.14
    Eye Candy
    RillRill’s Marble Necklaces, New In the Sight Unseen Shop

    The world lost a future ad exec the day Katie Freedle started her jewelry line, RillRill, back in 2010, but it gained a tireless creative entrepreneur. Freedle studied journalism, business, and advertising as an undergrad at the University of Oregon, but her interests were already drifting elsewhere: “They wouldn’t let non-art majors take metal-smithing back then, so I started studying jewelry post-college,” the Portland native recalls. “I didn’t want to become part of the cultish advertising life.” RillRill became a platform for her experimentation with materials — “I like to put many random things in front of me and experiment with all of the options,” she says — and Backtalk, the shop she opened two years later, became her venue for showcasing not just her own designs but those of 30 others, all of whom are no doubt as glad as we are that she turned her back on Madison Ave. We’ve just added three of Freedle’s striking marble and copper statement necklaces to the Sight Unseen Shop — check out more images after the jump, or click here to snag one for yourself!

  11. 06.03.14
    Up and Coming
    Sandy Van Helden, Illustrator

    Amsterdam-based 23-year-old Sandy Van Helden describes her illustration style as “clean, detailed, and aesthetic with a hint of mystery” — we couldn’t have said it better ourselves. We rarely feature illustration on Sight Unseen, just because there’s so little of it that suits our personal taste, but we were intrigued by Van Helden’s style the first time we saw her black-and-white portraits of women with bold, graphic eyebrows and hollow-eyed men silhouetted against swirling marbled backgrounds. There’s certainly something obviously of-the-moment about the Willem de Kooning Academy graduate’s work, but there’s something intriguing about it, too. Check out more of it below, including a recent installation Van Helden designed for one of Amsterdam’s coolest concept stores.

  12. 06.02.14
    Sighted
    Amazon Primed by Noah Kalina

    Most of the images that photographer Noah Kalina posts on his popular Tumblr feed are relatively random — portraits of friends, excerpts from his commercial shoots, behind-the-scenes tidbits. But every once in awhile, any of his million-plus followers who are paying attention will notice him initiating or adding to a recurring series, like the one in which he always documents, while traveling, the view from the window of his temporary room. These mini-projects represent his most personal work, the ideas he has and then pursues in his spare time, for no other reason than to challenge himself creatively and/or keep himself busy between shoots. Amazon Primed, his latest such endeavor, showed up on his Tumblr in late February in the form of an image depicting three external hard drives and an ethernet switch.

  13. 05.29.14
    What We Saw
    At New York Design Week 2014: ICFF & The Best of The Rest

    There was only one drawback to having a smashingly successful show of our own this year: It left us woefully little time to pound the pavement, seeing what other goodies this edition of NYCxDesign had to offer. A partial list of things we were sad to have missed: The Gourmand’s fruit stand at Vitsoe, the gorgeous Alexander Girard for Herman Miller space, a dance performance at The Future Perfect the night of our own cocktail party, Anna Karlin’s textile collaboration with Japanese weavers Hosoo at Atelier Courbet, the Yabu Pushelberg exhibition Rational x Intuitive Thought, and the debut of what may end up being the first and last furniture collection by Fab. But there were moments when we did manage to sneak away.

  14. 05.16.14
    Invitation
    Print All Over Me x Sight Unseen

    Back in December, we embarked on an experimental curatorial collaboration with Print All Over Me, the amazing print-your-own-pattern service, founded by fashion designer Jesse Finkelstein and his sister, Meredith, that allows designers to upload any graphic they please onto fashionable white blanks — sweatshirts, bomber jackets, shift dresses, backpacks, leggings, and more. The project — for which we hand-selected illustrators like Will Bryant, Tim Colmant, and Clay Hickson — was such a rousing success that Jesse approached us for round two a few months ago. We were already 100 percent sold on the idea, thinking we could sell the results at a pop-up at our Sight Unseen OFFSITE event — which opens today at noon! — when Jesse casually emailed this bomb: “Hey! Let’s also talk about print all over furniture!”

  15. 05.13.14
    What They Bought
    The I’m Revolting Ceramics Shop

    This week, we’re featuring a series of designers, brands, and exhibitors participating in Sight Unseen OFFSITE, our brand new design fair taking place in New York City this weekend, May 16-20. Click here for more information.

    Ceramicists know how to deal with heartbreak — these are artists, after all, who make something they love and then willingly throw it into a fire. So while the I’m Revolting Ceramics Shop that I’ve curated for Sight Unseen OFFSITE — opening at noon this Friday at 200 Lafayette in Soho — is in many ways a survey of talented young people working today in clay, it’s also a small tribute to the beauty in unpredictability and letting go. Unlike painting or weaving or most other mediums, potters don’t get to see the thing complete in front of them as they work. They shape a piece of clay with their hands and then give it over to the heat of the universe. And though this sounds totally cheeseball, that might be why I love it so much — that every piece carries in it some accident. The range of work in the I’m Revolting Ceramics Shop is a reminder of this possibility in imperfection: our perpetual struggle to take the same stuff there has ever been – mud and fire, failure and ambition – and create of it something distinctly personal.

  16. 05.10.14
    Saturday Selects
    Week of May 5, 2014

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a little bit of Scandinavian design heaven in downtown Los Angeles, lots of emerging designers under one roof in far-out Brooklyn, and a preview of the design hothouse that is the coming week in New York City.

  17. 05.07.14
    Studio Visit
    Upstate, fashion designers

    If there’s one thing we’ve learned here at Sight Unseen, it’s that a lack of training can sometimes go an awfully long way. Such was the case with Kalen Kaminski and Astrid Chastka of Upstate, who started their popular Brooklyn-based, shibori-inspired womenswear and accessories label back in 2010 with nary a day of fashion training between them. When they first met a few years earlier, Kaminski was an anthropology major turned prop stylist and Chastka was an architecture grad turned unhappy architect. Soon after bonding over an appreciation of handcrafted items, they found themselves trawling New York fabric stores, trying to replicate one of Kaminski’s vintage scarves. “We couldn’t find anything we liked, and we probably had no idea where to go,” Chastka told me when we visited the pair’s Greenpoint studio a few months back. “At the time, Kalen was living with an artist, and he had a shibori tapestry on his wall. We saw that, and we were like, ‘That’s perfect.’”

  18. 05.05.14
    Sighted
    Project No. 8′s New Website

    For years, fans of the New York concept shop Project No. 8 have been begging its founders, Brian Janusiak and Elizabeth Beer, to expand beyond their LES flagship and Ace Hotel annex and open more stores. But the pair have consistently refused, because they knew all along exactly where their next location needed to be: online. Their original website launched in 2006, but they’d recently grown so frustrated with its outdated design that they’d stopped updating it all together; this weekend, they quietly launched projectno8.com 2.0, a brand new site that’s truer to their current inventory and that effectively leapfrogs them over eight years of e-commerce evolution. Greeting visitors to the homepage is a slideshow of still-life images by New York photographer Clemens Kois, who met Janusiak when the pair collaborated on Carl Aubock: The Workshop — we asked each of them to tell us a little bit more about the project.

  19. 04.22.14
    Up and Coming
    Doug Johnston, Basket Artist

    Growing up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Doug Johnston was surrounded by the Native American art that his parents voraciously collected — woven rugs, Kachina dolls and coiled baskets made from materials such as pine needles, yucca, acacia and bear grass. But when the Brooklyn-based designer decided a few years ago that he’d like to learn coiling himself, to make baskets from stitched lengths of cotton rope, he didn’t travel to the Southwest to train with a master craftsperson. Instead, he went on YouTube, scouring instructional videos for a new approach. “Traditional coiling techniques are really labor-intensive,” he says. “You have to go inch by inch, one stitch at a time, and mastering that technique could take years. I was too impatient.”

  20. 04.04.14
    At Home With
    Ashley Helvey, Editorial Creative Director at Totokaelo

    At this point, simplicity can seem like a tired mantra or an admonishment, an extra layer of guilt heaped over our misdirections. Isn’t it enough that our cluttered thoughts keep us up at night? Do we have to feel bad about it, too? So it’s especially heartening that for Seattle-based stylist Ashley Helvey, simplicity is something else entirely: a look so easy that it serves as encouragement. “A lot of the imagery I’m inspired by online is just a piece of fabric or a cinderblock,” says Helvey, who is editorial creative director for Totokaelo, overseeing everything from photo shoots to social media. “They are really simple things that you could actually execute. Having a simple aesthetic is actually pretty tangible.”

  21. 03.31.14
    At Home With
    Jill Wenger, Owner of Totokaelo

    For most of us, stores are merely the fleeting destinations wherein we acquire our possessions, while homes are the more permanent spaces where we keep and lovingly display them. But for Jill Wenger, it’s the other way around: Ever since she moved to Seattle in 2001 and founded the cult boutique Totokaelo at just 26 years old, her store has been her material and spiritual base, while her living situation has remained mercurial. “I love change and generally don’t stay in any apartment or home longer than a year,” says the Texas native. Even as we interviewed her for this piece — which contains the first-ever published photos of one of her domestic interiors — she already had one foot out the door. Despite initially falling in love last May with her current apartment for its location — in Capitol Hill, three minutes away from Totokaelo — as well as its original hardwood floors and leaded-glass doors, Wenger is in the midst of searching for something new.

  22. 03.28.14
    What They Bought
    Local Made at Space Ninety 8

    When The Future Perfect abandoned its original Brooklyn location last summer, we thought we might never feel the need to shop on that particular block of Williamsburg again. The Future Perfect’s gorgeous digs got turned into a Gant, and for years we’ve felt we were a little too old for American Apparel. But come next Thursday, we’ll be making that trek on the L train again: Urban Outfitters is opening a concept shop on North Sixth Street called Space Ninety 8, complete with rotating gallery spaces, a restaurant, a rooftop bar, and, of course, clothing. But the draw for us will be located smack in the front window. That’s where a showcase called Local Made will take place, curated by Urban’s director of brand relations and special projects Marissa Maximo, who scoured the borough, commissioning exclusives from some of our favorite designers.

  23. 03.25.14
    Sight Unseen Offsite
    Introducing Your Newest New York Design Week Destination

    Here at Sight Unseen HQ, we’ve been keeping some pretty major news under wraps for a few months now, but it’s time to finally let the cat out of the bag. If you’ve been reading our site, you know that we founded and ran the Noho Design District, a satellite show during ICFF, for four years. This year we made the tough decision to retire the NDD and launch in its place a new event that shares our namesake: Introducing Sight Unseen OFFSITE, a brand new design fair happening in New York from May 16-20, 2014, that will feature a curated selection of furniture and product launches by the best independent designers and forward-thinking brands, all under one gigantic roof.

  24. 03.22.14
    Saturday Selects
    Week of March 17, 2014

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: The world’s most beautiful bike lock, an iPad cover inspired by New York and a table (above) inspired by Milan, and an epic terrazzo floor discovered in a local institution.

  25. 03.20.14
    Sighted
    Camille Walala x Third Drawer Down, on The Design Files

    File under “when awesome people collaborate”: We were pretty beside ourselves last week when the news floated our way that not only was the terrific Melbourne art and design shop Third Drawer Down opening a second location but that its exterior was going to be hand-painted by Camille Walala, the French-born, London–based graphic designer and illustrator whose work we’ve been obsessing over for the last year and a half. Walala first came to our attention when she collaborated on a print and textile line with the London concept shop Darkroom. More recently, we’ve been avidly Insta-stalking her; Walala’s eye for color and pattern is one of the best and most inspiring we know. As for Third Drawer Down, owner Abigail Crompton specializes in bringing the cool, cultish American designers and brands down under (think Kiosk, Ben Medansky, Fredericks & Mae, Confettisystem) but her commissioned artist editions with the likes of Nathalie du Pasquier, David Shrigley, Ai Weiwei, and Louise Bourgeois have us wishing she’d open up a New York outpost. Today we’re sharing with you some photos of the finished store, as well as excerpting part of a great interview with Walala that originally ran on The Design Files, one of our daily reads, after the jump.

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