Jose Davila

Jose Davila Creates Sculptures From Glass, Stones, and Gravity

Using simple materials like stone and cardboard, Mexican artist Jose Dávila mines art history to create some of the most relevant works today. His oeuvre is defined by a diverse, medium-traversing output, from his precariously balanced sculptural arrangements to his “cutout” series, in which he extracts the focal point of iconic works of art, creating an absence that bestows a three-dimensionality upon the resulting pieces. In all of his art, there is an underlying exploration of how the modernist movement continues to influence the modern mind.
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Vera Panichewskaja_Hidden Pyramids Mirror_150dpi_Photo_Jonas Carmhagen

Week of April 17, 2017

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week we must be experiencing spring fever, because we've fixated on a lot of green (a gallery by Antonio Carillo, an interior by Arquitectura-G, the border of the Vera Panichewskaja mirror above) and a lot of plants (an indoor garden in Paris, and more). Now if only the sun would come out in New York...
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Estudio Persona

These Uruguay-Born, Los Angeles–Based Women are Poised for Furniture Stardom

Four years ago, Emiliana Gonzalez and Jessie Young moved to Los Angeles from their hometown of Montevideo. Back in Uruguay, they'd known each other only peripherally, but as creatives in a new city, they were drawn to one another. Gonzalez had trained as an industrial designer, while Young was a conceptual artist and a new mother who didn't have the energy to navigate a new art scene. After designing a few houses together, they moved on to products — first geometric walnut planters, then furniture — and founded Estudio Persona.
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Nationale Portland gallery

This Portland Gallery Has Shown Only Female Artists Since the Beginning of 2017

Nationale is an art gallery in Portland, Oregon that represents eight emerging artists: four male, and four female. But since the beginning of 2017, the gallery has shown three female artists in quick succession — Amy Bernstein, a painter; Francesca Capone, a textile artist; and Emily Counts, a sculptor; whose work is everything we look for in a Sight Unseen subject — colorful, multidisciplinary, and meaningful. And while directors May Barruel and Gabi Lewton-Leopold swear that the suddenly gendered roster wasn't purposeful, it certainly feels refreshing in the current climate.
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Matt Paweski Chose Art Over Design — But We Forgive Him

Years ago, when we first profiled Matt Paweski, we got really excited about his colorful furniture, but alas, it was not to be: Paweski's roots have always been in art, and art is what's occupied his portfolio pretty much ever since. His newest body of work, which went on view today at Herald St. gallery in London, features sculptures any designer could appreciate.
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Abstract Geometric Paintings That Fold, Like Origami, Into Three Dimensions

On view at The Hole now, "Fourteen Paintings" is the first New York solo show for Louisiana-born, Los Angeles–based artist Robert Moreland, who in fact creates work that exists more in the space between painting and sculpture — three-dimensional canvases made from drop-cloths, tacks, leather hinges, and acrylic paint, that are hardly paintings at all but rather painted objects that explore how line and color can be disrupted by volume.
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a.reed 5

Five New Ceramics Collections We’re Feeling Right Now

Sometimes we get the feeling that we have altogether enough stuff. But then the period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve happens, and we realize that we somehow don't have all the requisite items for serving food, displaying flowers, or generally decking out our dinner table in a manner befitting a design editor. So this round-up couldn't have come at a better time: Meet five new ceramicists creating work that's sculptural but functional, minimal but avant-garde, and generally chic as hell.
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Vasa_Opener

At 83, Vasa — and His Famed Acrylic Sculptures — Are Still On Top of the LA Art World

When our friend and sometime contributor Robin Stein emailed us to reveal that Los Angeles artist — and longtime SU obsession — Vasa Mihich was an old family friend, and ask if we might be interested in shooting his Los Angeles studio and archives, we jumped at the chance. What Stein's photos reveal is something that we, who often focus on design's newest and youngest practitioners, rarely have access to: a portrait of an octogenarian artist, still producing at a rapid clip, at the height of his career and his potential; a maker clearly in love with both his materials and his process.
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Strauss Bourque-Lafrance

Strauss Bourque-Lafrance and the Deconstructed Domestic Space

Strauss Bourque-LaFrance’s work reflects a holistic approach to materials informed by the social function and status of objects as well as our relationship to them; the roles they play in our lives as symbols, signs, and totems. In Bourque-Lafrance's world, objects and paintings often get mixed up together with sculpture and interior design; his approach may be best summed up by his gallerist, Rachel Uffner, who calls it: “painting-in-the-expanded-field, painting-as-collage, painting-as-performance, and painting-as-sculpture.”
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From Light & Ladder, Sculptural Objects for Every Room in Your House

Brooklyn designer Farrah Sit may have left behind a career in the fashion world long ago, but the lessons from her time there still bear a mark. Her work — both for her eponymous furniture line and for her home accessories brand Light & Ladder — has always focused on creating sculptural volumes that shift and change according to the viewer's perspective, just like a garment. Her latest homeware collection for Light & Ladder is no different — a series of sculptural planters, candleholders, vases, mugs, and trinket boxes so lovely and different they nearly transcend those categories.
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Install 10_opener

Shiny Cubes and Popsicle Sticks in a California Light & Space Artist’s Retrospective

It’s a sweltering hot day in downtown Los Angeles when I visit California Light and Space artist Peter Alexander’s career retrospective at Parrasch Heijnen Gallery, but I feel immediately refreshed upon entering. It isn’t just the effect of the A/C, but also of Alexander’s geometric polyurethane sculptures, their glistening surfaces at once enticingly reflective and mysteriously opaque.
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Anthony Bianco Light & Space

Everything is Illuminated: Anthony Bianco’s Cool, Contemporary Glass Lights

When it comes to working with glass, says designer Anthony Bianco, the journey, so to speak — intense, immersive, rarely improvised — is just as notable as the destination. “The material is so physically demanding,” he says. “I’ve come to appreciate the involvement and the many steps it requires, from understanding the chemistry to creating the colors.” Having discovered a passion for glass nearly two decades ago, it’s a process with which the artist is more than well acquainted.
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