Tag Archives: textiles

  1. 12.10.14
    Studio Visit
    Maryanne Moodie, Brooklyn textile artist

    There are few people who get the opportunity to uproot, relocate, and be instantaneously welcomed by a community of powerful and creative women. But Maryanne Moodie — the Melbourne, Australia native who settled in Brooklyn last year after her husband got a job a Etsy — did just that. Since arriving, she says, “I’ve been able to meet and forge fast friendships with so many amazing textile ladies — inspirational women who are creative as well as business focused. I’ve had the chance to collaborate professionally with them — as well as down a few glasses of wine over plans for world domination.”

  2. 12.06.14
    Saturday Selects
    Week of December 1, 2014

    A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A full report on our travels in Miami and Finland is coming next week, but until then we have acid-trip lenticulars, ’80s-era armchairs, and the most G-rated fun you can have in 52 pages.

  3. 10.24.14
    Up and Coming
    Heddle & Needle

    Before she got hooked on weaving, Rachel Gottesman was both a painter and a jewelry-maker, and the influence of those preoccupations is wonderfully obvious in her small-scale textiles, which she creates under the name Heddle & Needle. Gottesman treats each small weaving as a tiny canvas on which to work out ideas about things like color, composition, linearity, topography, and adornment. Formerly a director of artist relations at Threadless in Chicago, Gottesman moved back to New York about a year ago, and in the short time since she discovered her affinity for the medium, she’s made weavings that incorporate grids, geometrics, hieroglyphs, brass charms — even tiny squares made to look like Boucherouite rugs. The weavings are small – usually no more than a foot wide and two feet long, though she has plans to go big — and accessibly priced, which is why we immediately looked her up when we needed someone to create a textile series for our recent pop-up at Space Ninety 8. At the same time, we thought it was the perfect time to get to know her a little bit better on the site.

  4. 09.22.14
    Eye Candy
    Hazel Stark’s New Textiles

    It was only just last year that we were wondering what brilliance Hazel Stark would produce if ever she turned her attention to designing and making full-time, and already we have the answer. Having left her job with Ally Capellino earlier in the summer, Stark initiated work on her new collection, Naturally Dyed #1, with a long period of research into materials.

  5. 08.25.14
    Eye Candy
    Sigrid Calon, visual artist

    For some reason, this is the week we finally put our money where our mouth is: First we took home one of Fort Standard’s beautiful, mint-colored standing bowls, and then, on a whim last Wednesday, we picked up a risograph by Dutch visual artist Sigrid Calon, who we’ve had on our radar for quite some time. The hardest thing about buying Calon’s work is narrowing down your options to just one — each print, which is based on the Tilburg artist’s interpretation of an embroidery grid, is beautifully layered, using eight gradated colors, dots, and lines to achieve endless variations. Which one would you choose? See more after the jump.

  6. 08.22.14
    Eye Candy
    KONTO, Installation and Product Designers

    KONTO is a collaborative installation, interior, and product design project by two Danish creatives, artist Morten Bencke and textile designer Elizabeth Kiss. The pair make things like lamps and trivets, but our favorite projects of theirs are more abstract, like the pastel totem pictured below, created for a friend’s music video, or the experimental sculptural series Montage 1, featured in the rest of this post. The pair describe their work as “based on light, balance, curiosity and colors” — check out more of it after the jump.

  7. 08.20.14
    Gramaway
    Win an iPhone Case From Mansi Shah!

    When we first discovered the work of New York textile designer Mansi Shah, we were impressed by the way she was able to make such playful prints and patterns look so ultra-sophisticated, from splatter-paint motifs to neon grids to squiggles. That quality is exactly what makes the items in her newly launched, eponymous accessories collection so wearable — they feel more fashiony than faddish, which is all the more impressive considering she graduated from CalArts with a degree in graphic design just six years ago. Having since done time designing for the likes of Warby Parker and Madewell, Shah recently set up shop on her own, offering both custom print services as well as the items in her brand new retail arm — scarves and iPhone cases at the moment, with caps, backpacks, and more to come, all of which channel her love of “hand-drawn typography and organic mark-making.” To celebrate the label’s launch, Shah is offering Sight Unseen readers the chance to win one of her Impasto-print iPhone cases, worth $42. Read on for instructions on how to enter.

  8. 07.23.14
    Eye Candy
    Jenny Pennywood, Textile and Print Artist

    Jenny Pennywood is the alter ego of fine artist Jen Garrido, and the moniker under which she produces her line of printed textiles. Working out of her San Francisco studio, Garrido creates printed linens on which the gestural quality of her brushstrokes becomes a pattern repeat in dashes and dots, lines and shapes. She makes paintings on paper first, inspired by formal issues of line, movement, shape and color, and then scans them, composing the final rhythmic patterns digitally. Her recent, and very successful, foray into over-dyeing with plant-based dyes all started when Garrido crashed her studio neighbors’ indigo vat one day — and loved the results. There is something undeniably good about the combination of bright painterly pattern with the soft, washed-out subtleties of natural dyes; brick-red dashes and moons are layered with madder root and stacked indigo triangles with oak galls. The resulting pieces have proved to be very popular, and Garrido now works with the talented Sierra Reading to oversee the natural dying part of the process. Check out all the Jenny Pennywood textiles here (plus some bonus, favorite prints on paper!) and then hop on over to More & Co to see and shop their cute top made exclusively from Jenny Pennywood yardage.

  9. 07.14.14
    Eye Candy
    Suzanne Antonelli, print designer

    On her Tumblr, Suzanne Antonelli self-identifies as a printed textile designer. But in truth, the Norwich, UK–based designer’s graphics have taken on such a life of their own that Antonelli has begun to be more widely known for the patterns themselves. In her webshop, those patterns are applied to vegetable ink–printed recycled paper notebooks, or, more simply, to giclee A1 posters — the better for adorning the walls of your house, which you’re going to want to do in spades after perusing these images. Of her interest in print-making — and particularly of the repetitive geometries that have become her signature — Antonelli has said: “I first became interested in pattern when I was doing my foundation in Brighton. There was hardly any room in the studio and desks were on a first come first serve basis; I think that the lack of space made me focus more and I produced a lot of really small detailed work on graph paper using tiny dots to make up different blocks of pattern.”

  10. 07.02.14
    Eye Candy
    Supreme Bon Ton’s Meteorite Collection

    Suprême Bon Ton is a Paris-based textile design studio helmed by Ella Perdereau, who founded it last year after traveling around India and Latin America for creative inspiration. Her first collection, Meteorite, is a series of scarves that incorporate patterns and textures from rocks and minerals. Perdereau worked with traditional textile printers in Lyon to produce the scarves, then turned to the up-and-coming photographer Florent Tanet — known for playful pastel still-lives that have been featured in the New Yorker and Wired — to photograph them. Tanet also shot Perdereau’s collection of painted rocks and other reference objects, which are featured in the second half of the post.

  11. 07.01.14
    Studio Visit
    Ilana Kohn, fashion designer

    “It was running joke as a kid, that all I wanted to wear were cut-offs and T-shirts,” says Ilana Kohn. “My mom would buy them by the pack, and I would cut the sleeves and the neck.” Of course, Kohn is now known as the creator of a rabidly collected, Brooklyn-based, cult-favorite clothing line, so was fashion always the master plan? Sure, she was interested in clothes, she says, but her teenage self would be more than a little surprised at this turn. At 18, she says, she did not want to be a “fashion person,” intending rather to study fine art and spend her life of painting. But after high school — in a move that would appease parents who worried about her making a living — Kohn left her native Virginia for New York City to study illustration at Pratt.

  12. 06.20.14
    What We Saw
    Our Top 5 From Show RCA 2014

    As the summer solstice approaches, so too does a wave of graduate shows offering up the latest creative projects and design solutions from the leading sphere of design schools. In London, no show is more hotly anticipated than the Royal College of Art’s annual exhibition Show RCA, noted for its impressive arsenal of postgraduate talent. We couldn’t miss the opportunity to spot this year’s pool of emerging stars across the contemporary art and design practices. The show took place simultaneously across two campuses: Design Products in Kensington, which offered its usual heady mix of modern-day design solutions, and over at the Battersea campus, Textiles, Fine Art and Sculpture students refreshed the visual senses with investigations into color and material. Here are our top five “ones to watch” from the exhibition.

  13. 06.17.14
    Eye Candy
    Milleneufcentquatrevingtquatre

    Is there any better canvas than the square silk scarf? Not for Amelie Charroin and Marie Colin-Madan of the French accessories brand Milleneufcentquatrevingtquatre. (That’s 1984 for the less Francophilic among you). The two women use the fashion staple to explore hand-drawn, screen-printed themes that take inspiration from video clips, art history, and instances of timeless pop culture.

  14. 06.11.14
    Eye Candy
    Osei-Duro, fashion designers

    Molly Keogh and Maryanne Mathias are Osei-Duro, two high-school friends who rekindled their relationship at a 10-year reunion and soon after began the so-named clothing line, which is headquartered in L.A. and designed and produced in Accra, Ghana. Partnering with garment workers in Ghana and using such native West African techniques as hand-dying, wax prints, hand-weaving, screen printing and mud paint, Osei-Duro’s clothes reference such disparate themes as ’90s fly girls and the hieroglyphics of early man. The label has also made it a priority to be a socially conscious and sustainable venture: The employees of Osei-Duro are paid a fair wage (much higher than Ghana’s minimum wage), and are taught transferable skills so they can remain competitive in their emerging market economy. First Lady Michelle Obama herself has worn an Osei-Duro skirt during a panel on education and technology in Johannesburg. See the well-loved looks here, then go to Osei-Duro’s site to find out more.

  15. 06.06.14
    Eye Candy
    Kieley Kimmel

    Color is Heat, Kieley Kimmel’s third official collection, found its initial inspiration in an overexposed landscape photo taken by the designer’s mother in the 1980s. Kimmel, a textile and clothing designer based in Los Angeles, works a very organic design process for each of her seasons, allowing evolution from start to finish. This approach, combined with a background in painting and philosophy, results in the most softly poetic of collections.

  16. 06.05.14
    Q+A
    20th Century Carpets at Wright

    At the modern design auction house Wright, rugs have long suffered that classic rom-com affliction: Always the bridesmaid, never the bride. Despite being the key focal point of most interiors and often being as artful as art itself, they’ve only played supporting roles in larger furniture auctions — a tendency not exclusive to Wright, either. Next week, though, the Chicago- and New York–based dealer is hosting its first sale devoted entirely to the genre: “20th Century Carpets,” comprising nearly 150 lots curated by Nader Bolour of Doris Leslie Blau, beginning with a late 19th-century animal-themed Indian tapestry and ending with contemporary kilims. In the middle, there’s an incidental emphasis on Swedish rugs, particularly mid-century examples made by the manufacturer Märta Måås-Fjetterström. To jazz up the sale’s catalog, Wright shot the images you see here, pairing some of its most beautiful lots with furniture and art by the likes of Jonathan Muecke and Ben Jones. Read more about it after the jump, in our interview with Wright’s Senior VP, Michael Jefferson.

  17. 05.29.14
    What We Saw
    At New York Design Week 2014: ICFF & The Best of The Rest

    There was only one drawback to having a smashingly successful show of our own this year: It left us woefully little time to pound the pavement, seeing what other goodies this edition of NYCxDesign had to offer. A partial list of things we were sad to have missed: The Gourmand’s fruit stand at Vitsoe, the gorgeous Alexander Girard for Herman Miller space, a dance performance at The Future Perfect the night of our own cocktail party, Anna Karlin’s textile collaboration with Japanese weavers Hosoo at Atelier Courbet, the Yabu Pushelberg exhibition Rational x Intuitive Thought, and the debut of what may end up being the first and last furniture collection by Fab. But there were moments when we did manage to sneak away.

  18. 05.27.14
    What We Saw
    At New York Design Week 2014: Sight Unseen OFFSITE, Pt. 2

    Though your Sight Unseen editors have been in major curation mode for the past two weeks, we’ve also had day to day work to do as, you know, journalists. So for five days during our Sight Unseen OFFSITE event last week, Monica and I set up camp on the Astroturf-covered bleachers of the MOLD Future Food Café, where we caught up on emails and posted stories to this very site. It was the perfect vantage point from which to view our own event: We could see friends and VIPs on their way in, and we could overhear people heading to the elevator, on their way up to the second floor. The most common refrain we heard? “Oh my God, there’s more upstairs?”

  19. 05.16.14
    Invitation
    Print All Over Me x Sight Unseen

    Back in December, we embarked on an experimental curatorial collaboration with Print All Over Me, the amazing print-your-own-pattern service, founded by fashion designer Jesse Finkelstein and his sister, Meredith, that allows designers to upload any graphic they please onto fashionable white blanks — sweatshirts, bomber jackets, shift dresses, backpacks, leggings, and more. The project — for which we hand-selected illustrators like Will Bryant, Tim Colmant, and Clay Hickson — was such a rousing success that Jesse approached us for round two a few months ago. We were already 100 percent sold on the idea, thinking we could sell the results at a pop-up at our Sight Unseen OFFSITE event — which opens today at noon! — when Jesse casually emailed this bomb: “Hey! Let’s also talk about print all over furniture!”

  20. 05.09.14
    Eye Candy
    ace&jig

    Stacked chevrons shot with metallic thread, plaids in earthy tones, small textured geometry and fat flat stripes. Ace&jig’s fabrics are the starting point for every collection, each textile custom-designed by the label’s duo, Cary Vaughan and Jenna Wilson, and then responsibly manufactured in India. This brilliantly styled preview of their Fall 2014 collection includes all of the label’s staple shapes: yoked blouses, peasant skirts, slouchy pants. But there’s also a notable inclusion of a bomber-style jacket, which sets up a very pleasing juxtaposition with a plaid mid-length skirt and our favorite: a quilted sweater that layers geometry with breathtaking modernity in its combination of woven pattern and over-stitch. Finally, we offer a nod to the complete genius of combining all this patterned wonder with spotted socks and spotted shoes. Hop on over here and check out their video short featuring Hannah Cohen being layered over and over in this clever collection.

  21. 05.07.14
    Studio Visit
    Upstate, fashion designers

    If there’s one thing we’ve learned here at Sight Unseen, it’s that a lack of training can sometimes go an awfully long way. Such was the case with Kalen Kaminski and Astrid Chastka of Upstate, who started their popular Brooklyn-based, shibori-inspired womenswear and accessories label back in 2010 with nary a day of fashion training between them. When they first met a few years earlier, Kaminski was an anthropology major turned prop stylist and Chastka was an architecture grad turned unhappy architect. Soon after bonding over an appreciation of handcrafted items, they found themselves trawling New York fabric stores, trying to replicate one of Kaminski’s vintage scarves. “We couldn’t find anything we liked, and we probably had no idea where to go,” Chastka told me when we visited the pair’s Greenpoint studio a few months back. “At the time, Kalen was living with an artist, and he had a shibori tapestry on his wall. We saw that, and we were like, ‘That’s perfect.’”

  22. 04.22.14
    Up and Coming
    Doug Johnston, Basket Artist

    Growing up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Doug Johnston was surrounded by the Native American art that his parents voraciously collected — woven rugs, Kachina dolls and coiled baskets made from materials such as pine needles, yucca, acacia and bear grass. But when the Brooklyn-based designer decided a few years ago that he’d like to learn coiling himself, to make baskets from stitched lengths of cotton rope, he didn’t travel to the Southwest to train with a master craftsperson. Instead, he went on YouTube, scouring instructional videos for a new approach. “Traditional coiling techniques are really labor-intensive,” he says. “You have to go inch by inch, one stitch at a time, and mastering that technique could take years. I was too impatient.”

  23. 04.18.14
    Eye Candy
    New Work by Katharina Trudzinski

    Four years ago, we visited the studio of Berlin-based artist Katharina Trudzinski — who’s also a co-founder of the German fashion label Hui-Hui — to learn more about how she used local scrap wood and street detritus to create sculptural works that fed her textile designs (and vice versa). After visiting her site recently and being impressed by what we saw, we figured it was high time to check back in with Trudzinski to give you an update on what she’s been working on since our last dispatch. See a sampling of her most recent projects after the jump.

  24. 04.17.14
    Studio Visit
    Sally England, fiber artist

    Until recently, you couldn’t hear the word “macramé” without it conjuring up visions of thrift-store place mats, summer camp friendship bracelets, and Mama Cass’s bolero vests. But thanks in part to Sally England, the masterful, Michigan-based, macramé artist who has made distinctly modern, large-scale commissions for the likes of Nike and Ace Hotels, the once nostalgic medium is having another day in the sun.

  25. 04.07.14
    Studio Visit
    Katy Krantz, ceramicist

    Katy Krantz likes to leave things to chance, at least when it comes to making ceramics. She has a method, but it involves working with a “wild and crazy collaborator” — a giant gas kiln that can fire clay at extremely high temperatures. “When you fire that high, the clay and glaze react in ways that are unpredictable. You get a lot of weird, random spotting, things that I would never be able to paint on.” That element of surprise and transformation runs through her colorful, abstract sculptural objects and jewelry, as well as her block prints and recent forays into fabric. Though she’ll establish “loose parameters” at the outset of a project, she says she’s “never been able to work with a real detailed plan in mind. I can work like that, but I tend to make really boring work that way. When I have too much control, it’s less interesting.”

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