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These Colorful Vases Are the Latest Sign that Acrylic Is on the Rise

Remember when we named the California Light and Space art movement one of the top trends to watch in 2017? Well, the evidence just keeps mounting. Seoul design trio Hattern say their new series of two-tone acrylic vases were inspired by the way Impressionist painters tried to capture the effects of changing light quality on nature, but we can't help but see elements of Vasa, Helen Pashgian, and Peter Alexander's work. Is acrylic the new marble?
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This Studio’s First Collection Is Inspired By Drinking and Fast Cars

You'd think that the new graphics and furniture studio Hey, Porter were based in Monte Carlo or St. Tropez based on the descriptions they've given their first designs: chairs inspired by the "1st running of the 24-Hour Le Mans Automobile Race in France," bar carts named after a "cunning craft cocktail ace from 19th-century London." Alas, their backstory is not quite as dramatic as their influences would suggest — but we're still intrigued.
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Four Design Calendars That Put iCal to Shame

No one NEEDS a physical calendar anymore, but we've scouted out four that are about to make you WANT one — two are entirely devoted to contemporary ceramics stars, one is a compendium of images by one of our favorite art directors, and the fourth facilitates world domination against a backdrop of futuristic interiors and flower arrangements. From boob potters on motorcycles to camels wearing party decorations, click through to shop our picks.
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The Best of Mexico Design Week 2016

This year's Mexico Design Week was proof that there's more happening in the country's design scene than ever, as the number of young studios launching work with a global sensibility steadily grows. We came back with dozens of photos to prove it, plus a long list of talents we'll definitely be keeping an eye on.
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A Finnish Textile Designer Who Tossed Out All the Rules of Textile Design

Reeta Ek is one of those fine artists who studied design for practicality's sake, as a way to ensure she'd actually be able to get a job upon graduation. Yet when it came time for her to start her thesis, she gave herself one last taste of freedom, opting to throw out all of textile design's typical rules and restraints and just create whatever pleased her.
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One-Of-a-Kind Resin Sculptures, Whose Fates Are Sealed in an Flash

Most artists and designers start their practices small, then scale up their work as their ambitions, finances, and studio spaces grow. London-based Zuza Mengham has done the opposite: Back in art school, she welded semi-functional steel sculptures so large and unwieldy she sometimes had to destroy them afterwards, while recently she began turning her attention towards resin experiments compact enough to perch on a bookshelf. Both endeavors come from a similar interest in working within the transitional states of materials.
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The Best of the 2016 Milan Furniture Fair, Part II

The 2016 Salone del Mobile and Fuorisalone — aka the Milan furniture fair — closes today, and we were there on the ground, running around like crazy people trying to absorb a year's worth of new furniture in less than a week's time. According to our iPhones, we walked about 7.5 miles a day in our quest to scout great design. Here's the second of three posts chronicling what we found.
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#weseefaces In These Clever Photos of Everyday Objects

When the Swiss-born, Paris-based product designer Miriam Josi started to feel restless with the pressure to constantly create new objects, she decided to collaborate with photographer Corinne Stoll to make something new out of old ones. To assemble the playful totemic compositions featured in their "Common Faces" series, the pair scavenged everyday objects both from their own homes as well as from a neighbor's basement.
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Erika Emerén is Doing Magical Things With Concrete

Swedish designer Erika Emerén's current practice involves dyeing and casting concrete in an experimental process that she has very little control over, then using it to make chairs, tables, and soon, lamps too. "The results always vary, especially when I'm mixing different colors," she says. "But that's what I prefer, to make something unique. The that I can't control is what makes the design interesting."
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