D’Agostin in his studio kitchen. Above him is a dot painting by Pierrette Bloch, for which he once traded an entire series of his photographs, and on the upper right is an image we jokingly christened “the flying fennel” during our visit. It’s from his upcoming book on acrobats in Shanghai, which he shot for only one hour on one roll of film. “That’s the beauty of photography — you can’t repeat these moments,” he says. “You have to anticipate everything. A fraction of a second later, and I wouldn’t have been able to see his feet behind his body. Here you can see his muscles, and his extreme strength.”
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D’Agostin in his studio kitchen. Above him is a dot painting by Pierrette Bloch, for which he once traded an entire series of his photographs, and on the upper right is an image we jokingly christened “the flying fennel” during our visit. It’s from his upcoming book on acrobats in Shanghai, which he shot for only one hour on one roll of film. “That’s the beauty of photography — you can’t repeat these moments,” he says. “You have to anticipate everything. A fraction of a second later, and I wouldn’t have been able to see his feet behind his body. Here you can see his muscles, and his extreme strength.”