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The Candy-Colored Ceramics Collection We’re Coveting

The new spring collection from Felt + Fat — the Philadelphia-based ceramics studio founded by RISD architecture grad Wynn Bauer and former Tyler School of Art glass major Nate Mell — looks like its cups, plates and bowls were colored with the powder of chalky-sweet candy hearts. Featuring matte pale pinks and swirls of sage, plus a bright and poppy blue and yellow, the tableware is as suitable for a shelf display as it is for a bustling dinner party — after all, the porcelain clay pieces can be found in restaurants all around the Philly scene.
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Win These $844 Calder-Inspired Earrings By Bario Neal

We didn't know why we were so drawn to Anna Bario and Page Neal's new jewelry collection when we first saw it earlier this month, but we probably should have guessed: It marked the first time the Philadelphia duo explicitly drew upon their design influences during their creation process. Click through to read more about the collection, plus enter to win the Circ Hoops shown above.
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Bario Neal & Linder Just Broke the Rules of Men’s Jewelry

The Philadelphia-based jewelry design studio Bario Neal has long offered wedding bands for men, and particularly expressive ones, at that: Some of its rings look like carved petrified wood, some have a hammered texture, some are boldly striped. But there's one steadfast rule of men's jewelry that even Bario Neal has never dared to break — until now.
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Egyptian-Themed Housewares by Beech Hall

Beech Hall, a new online shop based half in Brooklyn and half in Philadelphia, has a simple yet unconventional concept: to offer a line of jewelry, housewares, and ceramics based around a single, strong theme and design language, then change that theme from season to season. First up: Egypt.
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Baskets and Jewelry by Philadelphia’s Karen Gayle Tinney

For us, Karen Gayle Tinney was one of those surprises that you're shocked to find lurking in your own backyard — the artist and designer lives in Philadelphia, where for the past year she's been making elaborate woven baskets, planters, and necklaces for stores like Vagabond and Brooklyn's People of 2morrow.
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Roxana Azar, Photographer

We've been familiar with Philadelphia-based photographer Roxana Azar's work for some time now. Last summer, she took the snaps for our story on fellow Philadelphian Page Neal of Bario-Neal (where Azar also works), and she's the one responsible for the awesome images of the Jessica Hans / Bario-Neal earrings that often appear in our ad spot at the top of this page. But the second she sent us the latest personal series she's been working on, we knew we had to share — especially on a day like today, when we can only dream that spring might be around the corner. Azar digitally manipulates her photos to make them almost painterly or collage-like, but in the series we're sharing today, many of the images began as photographs from gardens where Azar spent her childhood. "I am really interested in using the photograph as a starting point to layer, erase, rebuild, and obscure an image, turning the image into something ambiguous yet playful," Azar says. "Ranging between chaotic clusters of poppies, fruit trees in limbo between positive and negative space, and colorful ecliptic spheres obscuring cactus pears and palms, I focus on gardens from my childhood and those I have newly explored." Scroll down for more beautiful images and then keep tabs on Azar's Tumblr for new work coming down the pipeline.
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In her Industrial Design program, Neal continues to work with metals, albeit on a larger scale.  This powder coated blue chair is made of bent sheet steel and sits at the designer’s kitchen table.

Page Neal of Bario-Neal

Seven years ago, when Page Neal and Anna Bario decided to relocate from New York and San Francisco respectively to work on a sustainably-minded line of jewelry, they chose Philadelphia because it was both affordable and close to New York City. “The decision to move here was a complete whim,” Neal told me over iced tea in her kitchen when I visited her South Philly home earlier this summer. “I didn’t know anyone and neither did Anna.” But the gamble paid off: The city, it turned out, had a thriving jewelry district where casting, engraving, and stone-setting workshops have sat above storefronts for generations. “It’s an amazing place for makers because small-scale manufacturing is really accessible,” Neal says.
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Ian Anderson, ceramicist

If you find it at all impressive that Philadelphia-based ceramicist Ian Anderson is releasing the debut collection we’re presenting here at the tender age of just 23, consider this: Anderson has been developing the collection’s asymmetrical, highly sophisticated forms in his head ever since he was a high-school student back in Mission Viejo, California. He just never had the studio set-up to realize them until now.
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OBJECTS, Curated by Joel Evey

OBJECTS began, as so many great things do, with Philadelphia-based graphic designer Joel Evey playing around with tool dip: A series of plastic-splattered lamps he made from grappling hooks gave way to an ambiguous dipped "kitchen tool" and, eventually, the curiosity as to how other genre-bending artists and designers he knew and admired were approaching issues of functionality. Last year, he reached out to half a dozen of those peers — ROLU, Chen Chen and Kai Williams, Eric Timothy Carlson, Brendan Timmins, and Alex da Corte — and invited each of them to present him with a piece that redefined or recontextualized the idea of a utilitarian object for the home. "It was loose and broad, but intentionally so," he says. "The point was to ask people who already existed within this playing field to do something that danced around the idea. The results are all very different."
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Andy Rementer’s People Blocks

One of the only things that bummed us out about doing a printed edition last year was that it was, in the end, an edition — only 400 of you (give or take a few) ever read the stories housed within its covers. Take Andy Rementer’s Inventory story, for which the Philadelphia-based illustrator styled and photographed his own creative influences, which ran from vintage lettering manuals to Italo comics. It was one of our favorite stories we’ve ever published. But the good thing about creative people is that they tend to keep creating awesomely publishable things, so today we bring you Rementer’s latest: interchangeable “People Blocks,” created in collaboration with the Belgium-based object editors Case Studyo.
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“I spent a year or so collecting these Spanish wrapped wine bottles, until I realized I had enough. For some reason they kept turning up at thrift stores in north Philly.”

Luren Jenison, Textile and Display Designer

Luren Jenison tends to describe her professional life as a “wild goose chase” — a neverending manic hunt through thrift stores, flea markets, and even forests to find the vintage oddities, natural artifacts, and textiles she uses in her elaborate installations. She’s constructed woodland scenes with foraged moss and taxidermied foxes for internal meetings at Anthropologie, set up tableaux with vintage books and building blocks for weddings and corporate galas, and even traveled all the way to China once to find a master joss-paper artisan to help her build a shimmery paper R.V. for a Free People store (he later panicked and pulled out of the project). And yet no matter how spectacular the results, at the end of the day they’re almost all temporary, set up for a night or a week or a month and then disassembled into their constituent parts to be trashed or banished to storage. Only the hunt goes on. If there’s one place you’d expect to find any permanent evidence of Jenison’s talents as both a visual stylist and an eagle-eyed picker, though, it would be in her own home.
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Melissa Bartley, Field Visual Manager of Terrain at Styers

When we first began hearing rumblings a few years back about Terrain, the garden center/home store/plant nirvana/farm-to-table café/dreamy wedding venue located 40 minutes outside of Philadelphia, we had no idea that the place was founded and operated by Urban Outfitters. Wouldn’t it be nice, we thought, to do a profile one day on the sweet couple who must own the place? But don’t laugh at our cluelessness just yet. Though its flagship campus is huge — nearly a dozen buildings spread out over five acres — Terrain has the intimate vibe and the quirkily curated stock of a much smaller operation. Credit for projecting that cozy vibe, despite being part of one of the biggest retail conglomerates in the country, goes in large part to Terrain’s visual team — the buyers, merchandisers, and creatives who stock the place with mason jars, ticking stripe aprons, vintage planters, sea salt soaps, bocce ball sets, and terrariums.
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