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Velho_opener
11.21.14
Eye Candy
Marcello Velho, illustrator

We’ve become quite fond of these late-Friday hits of pure joy, and this one arrived in our inboxes just in the nick of time. Marcello Velho is a United Kingdom–based graphic artist. His abstract compositions have quite justly made the blog rounds in recent months, but we particularly love the new styled photos he sent of his work below, which mix Tumblr-inspired art with modern furniture icons. Velho works across different mediums including publications, posters, and textile design. His prints are currently for sale via the Australian shop Visions, alongside another favorite artist of ours: Kristina Krogh. Happy Friday!

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red_cups_opener
11.20.14
Q&A
Matthias Kaiser, artist

I had a long conversation over email this week with Matthias Kaiser, whose masterful ceramic work was a personal highlight of the show I curated for Sight Unseen OFFSITE earlier this year. The exchange reaffirmed my sometimes-waning faith in ceramics, or in anything that suddenly becomes so widely hyped that it can feel like we’re too busy being professionals to remember what struck us through about the practice in the first place. Kaiser, who now lives in the Austrian countryside having previously apprenticed with Japanese master potters and spent a combined two years
traveling on the Indian subcontinent, speaks with the deep humility that comes with not taking shortcuts — with digging for your own clay, for example, or moving to Isfahan to study Sufi mysticism. He compares himself to “bad clay,” talks about how losses are a part of the game, and makes a joke about beards.

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Francis_staged2
11.19.14
Studio Visit
Egg Collective, furniture designers

When Egg Collective launched their debut furniture collection at ICFF in 2012 — snagging a Best New Designer award in the process — they seemed to the design world to have come out of nowhere. And in fact, though the three — Stephanie Beamer, Crystal Ellis, and Hillary Petrie — met and began collaborating as 18-year-old freshmen at Washington University’s architecture school more than a decade ago, the truth is they had formally joined forces and had begun crafting an ICFF plan only six months earlier. “I remember the three of us sitting outside the Javits Center in our Budget truck, about to move in furniture that we’d been working on with no one having seen for six months,” says Beamer. “I was like, you guys, this is it. People could just walk by us the entire fair. But thankfully we seem to have struck a chord and the work resonated.”

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Turnbull_Opener
11.17.14
Eye Candy
Meredith Turnbull, artist

A few Saturdays ago, we featured Australian artist Meredith Turnbull’s incredible, powder-coated brass jewelry, but today we wanted to turn your attention to her equally terrific art practice. Navigating her website, we became intrigued by images of totemic metallic structures that were nevertheless labeled as photography. We asked Turnbull herself to clarify: “My practice as an artist has really been shaped by my training: first studying photography, then doing a degree in Art History, then later a degree in Fine Art specializing in gold and silversmithing. This affected the way I work and made me very interested in ideas in and around discipline, functionality, art and design history, and of course context! I’m preoccupied with theories and ideas about purposeful objects and their relationship to people as well as new contexts for those ideas. So I make objects across a variety of scales. Sometimes I photograph these but only exhibit the photograph; sometimes I show small objects alongside larger installation work. I’m always trying to work with scale and the context in which I’m exhibiting.”

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OS---OOS-for-Please-wait-to-be-seated_Keystone-chair-_1248-1_opener
11.15.14
Saturday Selects
Week of November 10, 2014

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week, it’s almost time to start gifting! We’ve got high and low lights, artist-edition shoes, affordable trays by one of our favorite designers, and a pop-up shop filled with a collector’s curiosities.

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IE_5955_sm
11.14.14
Studio Visit
Ida Ekblad, artist

One look at Ida Ekblad’s studio and you might wonder how the Norwegian artist manages to do any work in this beautiful seaside spot near Oslo. We’d worry about getting distracted, or worse, growing complacent. But it hasn’t taken the edge off of Ekblad’s output. If anything, having such a large, light-filled space has allowed her to “experiment on a huge scale” with her process and materials. It’s only added to the tension in her quasi-abstract paintings, which are both dreamy and dynamic, combining depths of color and fluid shapes with a kind of graphic clarity and confidence.

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EYECANDY_Template
11.13.14
Eye Candy
Intertidal Deployment Objects

On a visit a few weeks ago to Design Week Portland, we spied these cute Intertidal Deployment Objects by Trygve Faste and Jessica Swanson, a married couple who are also both instructors in the University of Oregon’s Product Design program. Faste teaches design drawing and makes vibrant 3D paintings, while Swanson specializes in ceramics and sculpture, and for this work, the two combined their skills to create a series of ceramic pots and sculptures influenced by buoys. “The Intertidal Deployment Objects arose out of our interest in working with ceramic forms that would interact with and relate to the marine environment,” says Faste. “We developed our forms to reference maritime objects like navigation buoys, floats, knots, jugs, bottles and industrial nautical equipment.”

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notyettitled(palm)
11.12.14
Sighted
Marten Elder in 01 Magazine

Sometimes you have to laugh at your own predictability. It was love at first sight when I first saw these images of Los Angeles photographer Marten Elder’s work in the fantastic new issue of 01 Magazine (which also features SU faves like Oeuffice and Doug Johnston). But when I began to read the article, it became immediately clear to me why: Elder studied at Bard College, where his senior project advisor was Stephen Shore, another visual fascination of mine. But while Elder’s older work is more like Shore’s in its exquisitely faithful representation of a banal reality, his newer work represents a more color-saturated view of those equally ordinary vistas (a concrete street corner, a stack of scaffolding.) The accompanying interview is great, so we’re excerpted part of it, as well as our favorite images, here. Go to 01’s current issue for the full article, then visit Elder’s website for even more images.

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