Melbourne design store Guild of Objects

A Must-Visit Design Store in Melbourne

Guild of Objects fills an interesting gap in Melbourne — a store that isn’t quite a gallery, but is far from a gift shop. Each object — handmade by an Australian maker and often one-of-a-kind — has a story behind it. Quality materials and an emphasis on craftsmanship are central to each piece — otherwise they wouldn’t be here.
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The Faded Pastels and Geometric Glamour of Ward Roberts’s Courts Series

If you're familiar with the work of photographer Ward Roberts, chances are you found his work, like we did, on Pinterest. After all, the New York–based photographer's images were practically made for social media, featuring as they do the aesthetic memes du jour: muted, pastel colors; graphic, geometric compositions; and architectural wonders seemingly devoid of any people. In Roberts's case, the backdrop common to all of his photos are the basketball and tennis courts of Hong Kong, where the Australian-born photographer was raised from the age of three.
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Repossi Paris flagship OMA Sabine Marcelis

In Paris, the Anti-French Jewelry Boutique

Here's something we never thought we'd be covering on this site: A French jewelry boutique. The very idea seems too fussy for our forward-thinking aesthetic, calling to mind things like porcelain reliefs, gilded displays, and grand spiral staircases. But the new Repossi flagship in Paris's Place Vendôme, designed by Dutch architects OMA, contains precisely none of those things.
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Equilibrio Frágil y Simétrico by Cristian Montesinos

For his ongoing series of miniature totems, Barcelona-based graphic and furniture designer Cristian Montesinos collects and paints scraps of found wood, which he keeps on hand for the assembly and photographing of each piece. "Biking or walking in Barcelona I always find what I need," he says. "I keep the pieces, classified by size, and use them when I need them. When I work with these woods, I feel I'm returning to them a part of the dignity that was lost when they were thrown away. When I paint them I try not to completely cover the material, as part of the idea is to show and appreciate the tangible past of the object."
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Week of July 11, 2016

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: the new ceramics at the top of our wish list, resin and glass tables that channel the California Light and Space movement, and a dream-team collaboration by Philippe Malouin and Bethan Laura Wood, pictured above.
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An (Oft-Copied) Still-Life Photographer Shows Us How It’s Done

Packing peanuts, crumpled-up paper, a chic side table tipped on its side — no, it's not your average moving scene of chaos in transit, but rather one of the unexpected, still-life compositions devised by New York–based photographer Joanna McClure. McClure's work often shows up in places like T Magazine or for brands like Loeffler Randall, but her photos walk the line between the commercial and fine art — abstractly subjective, employing everyday materials into thought-provoking scenarios.
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A Landscape of Architectural Ceramics at Patrick Parrish Gallery

Since we first spoke to him four years ago, ceramicist Ian McDonald's pieces have gotten more architectural, more functional, and more singular — his first solo show at Patrick Parrish Gallery in New York opened yesterday, and it's full of ceramic vessels made in parts and arranged within the parameters of powder-coated trays. We spoke with him about refining the old, experimenting with the new, and the satisfaction he’s found in exploring a form that resonates.
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Anthony Sperduti Hamptons home tour

Anthony Sperduti’s Art-Filled Hamptons Hideaway

Partners & Spade's Noho storefront closed in 2014, as the brand grew up, evolved, and moved into swankier digs on Lafayette Street. But I was happy to see its spirit alive and well when I walked into Anthony Sperduti's Sag Harbor cottage for the first in an editorial series we're doing with SONOS on the homes of some of New York's most interesting — and influential — creatives. Sperduti's weekend Hamptons house, tucked away in a quiet corner on the Sag Harbor Bay, is our favorite kind of home — the perfect mix of vintage and contemporary art and objects, each with a fascinating story behind its acquisition.
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A Wallpaper That Lets You Cover Your Walls With Kaleidoscopic Spraypaint

When the New York design showroom Colony presented new work by its roster of emerging talents during design week this past May, the furniture wasn't the only highlight — several of the space's carefully styled object vignettes were backdropped by rainbows of hyper-color ombre splatter-paint that we zeroed in on immediately, assuming they were an artful site-specific flourish applied by someone who knew their way around a spray can. Not so: They were actually panels of large-scale, non-repeating wallpaper by Brooklyn's Flat Vernacular, in a new pattern called The Heavens.
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Week of June 27, 2016

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a weirdly synchronous amount of folded metal, a colorful alternative to all those brass bottle openers, and a new way to experience an exhibition on the other side of the world.
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Emily Mullin still-life sculptures

Still-Life Sculptures That Blur the Line Between Photography and Art

In its guise as a flower shop, Saffron Brooklyn had already hosted its share of exhibitions over the years, everything from photography by Youngna Park to ceramics by Katy Krantz. So it makes sense that the sister-owned shop would eventually open a gallery of its own: Sunday Takeout, a tiny spot in Fort Greene next door to Saffron, opened in April of this year. On view now, their second-ever exhibition on view now — by Brooklyn-based Emily Mullin (who goes by the studio name Vachina) — in fact bridges both of those mediums, photography and ceramics. Her show spotlights a series of wall-based, still-life sculptures featuring glazed ceramic vessels on painted sheet metal.
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