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The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 5

Created by the Berlin-based Studio Greiling for Kinnasand's Toyo Ito–designed Milan showroom, the STRUCTURES series uses powder-coated, architectural steel tubes to lift the Swedish textiles company's knotted or woven wool rugs to a new height, elevating the formerly flat surfaces into a new dimension: furniture.
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The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 4

We’ve never seen any shame in a finish fetish, and at this week’s Milan fair the Amsterdam-based studio Odd Matter did the art movement proud with a project called Guise. Developed for a brand new contemporary/experimental arm of Nilufar Gallery called Far — which also had its official launch this week — Guise consists of three benches and a console made from carved foam that’s been coated in either iridescent car lacquer, or a classical faux-marble painting technique called Scagliola.
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The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 3

In the 5Vie district, in an old flat that's been used for a couple of years as an exhibition space, we found the show Unsighted, curated by our friend Nicolas Bellevance-LeCompte of Carwan Gallery. For the brief he asked eight designers to create a collection not knowing who, what, or where it was bound for; our favorite of the collections was by a young designer named Roberto Sironi, who created Ruins, a series of benches, stools, mirrors and tables that juxtapose elements of the classical and industrial eras.
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The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 2

One of the first projects we saw this week was a new collection by Bloc Studios, for which the Carrara-based studio collaborated with three of our favorite designers: Nick Ross, Valentina Camarenesi Sgroi, and Objects of Common Interest.
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The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 1

Sight Unseen is on the ground at the Milan Furniture Fair this week and we’ll be bringing you loads of coverage next week! But until our rounds here are done, we’ll be featuring quick hits from some of our favorite things that caught our eye. First up, the brand-new lighting collection from Vancouver-based brand ANDLight, featuring new work by co-founders Lukas Peet and Caine Heintzman, and launching at Venture Future.
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Week of April 9th, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a pink velvet daybed that’s sure to be a conversation starter, an Instagram-centric installation that’ll live on forever in our feeds, and a series of small spaces that make the most of neutral wood tones and pops of pastels.
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Sculptural Minimalism and Negative Space in a New Collection of Danish Design

For her latest collection, Danish designer Maria Bruun teamed up with fellow Royal ​D​anish ​A​cademy of ​D​esign alum Pernille Andersen, a set designer with a strong background in photography. Both designers came at the collaboration with a desire to strip everything down to a minimum and focus on the idea of “non-space."
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Week of April 2, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: sneak peeks from the upcoming Milan Furniture Fair, the Italian 3D rendering studio that's absolutely killing it, and the best salon-style art wall we’ve seen in recent memory.
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The Swiss Artist Turning Photographs and Digital Renderings Into High-End Carpets

Growing up in the '90s in Switzerland, Nadja Stäubli always had an analog camera with her. "I ended up studying photography at the University of Arts in Switzerland, and, for my thesis project, I wanted to work with a different medium then simple photography," explains the founder of the cult-favorite rug company Schoenstaub. Stäubli dug around to find a high-density weaving machine that could translate the grain of her 35mm film into knots on a rug, and, through family connections, ended up finding the only one that could do it in the world. The idea was to produce a single carpet for a gallery; it was such a success, Stäubli decided to turn the enterprise into a full-fledged company.
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