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A Self-Taught London Designer On How to Make Furniture That’s Poetic But Not Pretentious

EJR Barnes is interested in the ways furniture can become poetic or dreamlike when reframed with unexpected materials, forms, and juxtapositions. His creations engage a wide range of materials and techniques — birch plywood, gilded silver leaf, lacquered oak, powder-coated steel, pressed cane, cork, paper pulp slathered in wheat paste, even faux fur or scruffy suedes. Through all of this experimentation, Barnes seeks a quiet sort of subversion.
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EJR Barnes — Your New Favorite Instagram Follow — On His Top 10 Vintage Furniture Finds

Elsewhere on the site today, we're featuring the London designer EJR Barnes, whose work first came to our attention via his smooth, aptly named Buffalo Mozzarella chair. But we were actually first introduced to Barnes via his Instagram, where he chronicles his favorite — and often completely obscure — vintage furniture finds, from Borsani daybeds to Vignelli glassware to Kukkapuro lamps. Click through for a glimpse at Barnes's current obsessions.
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The Best of Milan Design Week 2019, Part II — Salone Satellite

We're devoting all of our coverage this week to the 2019 Milan furniture fair, from the best things we saw around town, to the best of this year's Euroluce show, to the up-and-coming designers and new brands we discovered along the way. Today we're sharing our 13 favorite collections at Salone Satellite, the section of the Salone del Mobile fairgrounds devoted to emerging talents — which is where we discovered many a Sight Unseen veteran back in the day, from Sebastian Herkner to Ana Kras.
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Designer, Painter, Sculptor, Architect — This Parisian Multihyphenate is About To Be Everywhere

The Instagram bio of Paris-based designer Garance Vallée once included the designation “HumanCreativeRomantic;” a quick scroll through her works, and painter, illustrator, jewelry designer, sculptor, and furniture designer could all easily be included as well. Vallée is a quintuple threat who recently completed her master’s degree in architecture and scenography, where she focused on concrete pieces, or what she considers “objects as small architecture.” But whichever medium she’s in, Vallée seems equally at home.
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Week of February 18, 2019

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: Our picks from Frieze L.A., a new furniture series that marries the ancient and contemporary, and a series of minimalist lamps by a young Brazilian studio on the rise.
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You’ll Never Believe How These Ombré Ceramics Are Made

We've seen designers do a lot of crazy things with ceramic in our career, but Philipp Schenk-Mischke's incredibly bizarre process might be our favorite yet — he uses a body vibration plate, co-opted from the fitness industry, to gently jiggle his way to a unique, slumped ceramic form.
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Week of January 21, 2019

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: An eccentric contemporary update on our favorite Cini Boeri chair, a new series of rugs inspired by Miro and Rothko, the latest releases by Ligne Roset, and two workspaces that look more like incredible homes (above).
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Week of January 7, 2019

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A Danish design studio combining flowers with furniture, an Italian artist making neo-classical baskets, and a mystery interior with the perfect 60s-meets-80s vibe (above).
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A Furniture Collection in London Made From 3D Printing’s Leftovers

Years ago, when London-based designers Seongil Choi and Fabio Hendry met as students at the Royal College of Art, they were asked to make a stool — which, at the time, they had very little interest in doing. Yet by channeling their common backgrounds in industrial design and their interest in finding uses for low-value, abundant resources, they inadvertently developed an innovative process — called Hot Wire Extensions — by which they have now made many, many a stool, and so much more.
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