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This is the Coolest Furniture Coming Out of Ireland By a Mile

If you happened to step into the new Orior showroom during New York Design Week, you were rewarded with a serious feast for the senses — plush, vibrantly colored velvets, deep green marbles and glossy woods, all of it showing the mark of impeccable craftsmanship. Here was Atlanta, a sinuous cobalt-blue sofa wearing a tasseled skirt, and Nero, a glossy oak table with a Brutalist marble base. There was Mara, a walnut and marble credenza fronted by varicolored leather doors, and Futurist, a muscular couch whose tomato-red leather cushions sit atop ebony legs. This, you realized, was furniture with personality, and the coolest thing coming out of Ireland by a mile. So where exactly did it come from?
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Philippe Malouin on How He Created What Just Might Be Basel’s Most Unusual Collection Ever

Every year, it seems like the contemporary work exhibited at the premiere design fairs gets more intricate and labor-intensive, more whimsical and wacky, more conceptual and process-driven. At this week's Design Miami Basel show, however, Salon 94 Design is departing from that convention in an epic way, with a presentation called Industrial Office that draws on basic ideas and questions from Philippe Malouin's work on commercial office furniture, but pushed to extremes in terms of materials, engineering, and fabrication. We spoke with Malouin to find out more.
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Meet Greta Cevenini, The Best Italian Interiors Stylist You’ve Never Heard Of

Greta Cevenini has been quietly circling behind the scenes of the Italian design world for the past few years, styling lookbooks for Spotti and cc-tapis and envisioning spreads for Icon Design; she most recently took the helm for Cassina’s new catalogue, which was released during Salone. Her work is quiet — cool and rich with light-touch visual references well before they become ubiquitous, leaning more on texture and subtle color variations rather than dramatic, scene-stealing statements.
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Egg Collective’s New Tribeca Showroom is One of the Best Places to Look at Furniture in New York

Sometimes we forget that Crystal Ellis, Hillary Petrie, and Stephanie Beamer of Egg Collective went to architecture school before moving to New York to begin their career as furniture designers. But step one foot into the Tribeca showroom the trio recently debuted during New York Design Week, and the ease the three women have when dealing with materiality and interior space hits you like a ton of bricks (no pun intended).
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Our Favorite Finds at New York Design Week 2019 — Part II

With our OFFSITE show taking the year off, the biggest question we got this week wasn't "What have you seen that's good?" but rather "Doesn't it feel great to do nothing?" And while the latter question was valid (and the answer an emphatic yes), the fact that our schedules were free and easy this year actually allowed us to see even more that was quite good. Today we're rounding up our favorites from the two big shows, ICFF and Wanted.
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Does Eny Lee Parker Have the Best Booth at ICFF?

In the past two years, Eny Lee Parker has doubled down on ceramics as a primary material — despite having injured her back a little over a year ago while throwing a large piece on the wheel. "I’m doing my best coming up with things I can manage without throwing all the time," she explains, "so my new pieces are all about doing what you can — no need to be perfect." It's a humble way to describe what many have dubbed the best booth at ICFF this year.
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Pelle’s New York Design Week Installation Brings the Drama

For sheer bonkers drama, our New York Design Week pick today is Unnatural Habitat by Pelle, a showroom installation of new work that includes a lighting system meant to resemble both floating dust particles and a shattered mirror as well as a giant, hand-sculpted banana frond turned pendant light.
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Fort Standard’s New Striped Wood Collection Goes Against the Grain

Gio Ponti, cabana stripes, hoop skirts — these are just a few of the references that come to mind when you first see Fort Standard's new Cooperage collection, made from alternating stripes of light and dark wood, which launched this week in New York at Colony Design. But what you don't necessarily think of is the process by which Fort Standard founder Gregory Buntain achieved the collection's incredibly playful, graphic look.
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This Design Museum Turns Real Swedish Homes Into Museums for a Day

The Swedish Design Museum is not your typical museum — it has no permanent collection, nor does it have a cool Modernist structure in which to house its contents. It's a virtual museum whose goal is to bring Swedish design to the many — the way accessible Swedish design was always meant to be. Now, however — in a slight twist — the Swedish Design Museum is offering visitors the rare opportunity to peep inside real Swedish homes, to witness IRL design as it was meant to be.
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Studiopepe Went Full Mystic For Milan Design Week

A few weeks ago, while other brands and design studios were barraging our inboxes with press releases and preview images pre-Salone, Studiopepe — the Milan-based interiors duo of Arianna Lelli Mami and Chiara Di Pinto — kept relatively mum, announcing only that they would be investigating "the interconnection between matter and the archetypal power of symbols" in a former gold factory in Porta Venezia. In other words: design week catnip.
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Week of April 15, 2019

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A sneak preview of an all-star Spanish design exhibition coming to New York next month, the hard-to-get pastel-colored glassware we're pining for, and a jaw-dropping new collaboration between a Belgian fashion designer and architect, pictured above.
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