“This winter I got really into beeswax candles. They make the best patterns when they melt. The eye bowl is by Karin Gulbran, part of her recent exhibition at South Willard in LA. The turquoise tiles are Geoff McFetridge for Heath Ceramics: ‘My Head Disappears While My Hands are Thinking.’  I added little bits of cork to the bottom so they can be used as coasters or hot plates or something. And that bit of pottery in the corner is a piece by Mondays Projects.”

Brian W. Ferry, Photographer

If photographer Brian W. Ferry shoots like he takes absolutely nothing for granted — making us pine hard for moments of intensely quiet, understated beauty that probably already exist in our everyday lives — it’s likely because he feels so grateful to be doing what he’s doing. He may have discovered his inner camera nerd way back when he was growing up in Connecticut, but just a few short years ago, he was working long hours as a corporate lawyer in London, taking pictures merely as a personal creative escape hatch. Only after his blog began delivering fans and potential clients to his digital doorstep did he gather the resolve to quit his job, move to Brooklyn, and make a career out of triggering in people a kind of strange, misplaced nostalgia. “I think a lot about taking photos that are about more than capturing something beautiful, that have a heaviness attached to them,” Ferry told us earlier this winter at his Fort Greene garden apartment, as we rifled through his belongings together. “The heaviness doesn’t need to be negative, just convey a real sense of purpose. That’s hard to do.”

And yet he’s certainly doing it, as both followers of the Blue Hour and clients like Starbucks would no doubt agree. That’s why we’re so excited to share the news that he’s become Sight Unseen’s newest contributor, having already shot two studios for us that will be posted here in the coming month. First, though, he turned his lens on his own home, documenting the interests and influences from his inner world that help shape his unique view of the outer one.