"Nothing's special about any of these," Williams says of this sampling from his twine ball collection. "I'm just fascinated by all the different shapes. How did they come up with all of them? And why not just one shape?" It was his good friend Fritz Karch, Martha Stewart's collecting editor, who got him and the twine on the doyenne's show. Williams seems to consider Karch a kind of kindrid spirit, speaking of him often and with an obvious reverence for his encyclopedic knowledge of antiques, something Williams claims he lacks. "He’d be a national treasure if he lived in Japan," Williams notes.
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"Nothing's special about any of these," Williams says of this sampling from his twine ball collection. "I'm just fascinated by all the different shapes. How did they come up with all of them? And why not just one shape?" It was his good friend Fritz Karch, Martha Stewart's collecting editor, who got him and the twine on the doyenne's show. Williams seems to consider Karch a kind of kindrid spirit, speaking of him often and with an obvious reverence for his encyclopedic knowledge of antiques, something Williams claims he lacks. "He’d be a national treasure if he lived in Japan," Williams notes.