OMMO's colorful kitchen accessories

Colorful Kitchen Accessories by the Designer Behind Your Favorite Brand

If you've ever lusted after many of Hay's simple but colorful accessories — from the ultra-covetable Strike matches to the duotone Analog clock — you have Shane Schneck to thank for that. The Swedish-American designer, along with his wife Clara von Zweigbergk, has for years created products and headed up the art direction for the Danish brand from his studio in Stockholm. Now, Schneck is bringing his finely tuned eye to another Scandinavian-chic housewares brand: Ommo, a colorful kitchen accessories collection that's debuting in the U.S. this week.
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Perhaps the most poetic piece in the series is the music box, which plays classical music while twirling a potato around on a pedestal. “It highlights the hidden beauty of the potato, something people never consider," she says. "When it sprouts they’re thinking, ‘Oh it’s rotten, we have to throw it away.’ But I saw so many different amazing forms.”

Everyday Growing by Juliette Warmenhoven

Juliette Warmenhoven grew up in Holland’s so-called bulb district, near Haarlem, in a small village called Hillegom. Her father is a flower farmer. If it all sounds very quaint, it might have been 20 years ago — but then tulip production went the way of the meat industry thanks to globalization, and farming became a race to create the maximum amount of homogenous bulbs in the shortest amount of time. “My father feels farming is like working in a factory now,” says the Arnhem-based designer. Just as shrink-wrapped steak has been divorced from the killing of the cow, plants are more about the perfection of the end product than the actual growing process. “I believe that when you explain that process to people, they get more feeling out of it,” she says. For Everyday Growing, her graduation project at Arnhem’s ArtEZ school, she built a series of small monuments to plants’ humble — and often imperfect — origins.
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Plastic Dreams: Synthetic Visions in Design

There are several somewhat shocking things about Plastic Dreams: Synthetic Visions in Design, the first book out from a new eponymous imprint by ex-Taschen impresarios Charlotte & Peter Fiell. First and most arresting is its bright orange, webbed half-slipcover, designed by the Brazilian shoe company Melissa and infused with that company’s signature scent: It’s somewhere between a piece of tutti-frutti chewing gum and a bottle of Designer Imposters fragrance. Second is the reminder that some plastics aren't wholly synthetic — a fact that’s easily forgotten — but rather the descendants of various amazingly named rubber plants, like Gamboge, Gutta Percha, and Caoutchouc. And third is the realization of just how many products would never have been possible, or would at least have been dramatically altered, without the material’s development: dental plates, curling irons, vinyl LPs, and more.
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