On the wall, a work by Brooklyn-based artist Carrie Schneider. It’s a portrait of her brother, who appeared in her series of creepy-funny photographs exploring the boundaries of sibling relationships, Derelict Self. Meloche recently posed for a portrait as part of Schneider’s Reading Women project. Her book of choice for the shot: Grace Coddington’s memoir.

Monique Meloche, Chicago Gallerist

When Monique Meloche took a chance on opening a Chicago gallery back in 2000, she launched with a show called Homewrecker, for which she invited 30 artists to exhibit over all three floors of her Ukrainian Village townhouse. The huge turnout prompted her to find a more permanent spot, as did gentle prodding from her husband. “He was like, ‘Sorry, I don’t want people sitting on my bed watching videos on Saturday when I come home from the gym.’” But while her home is no longer on public view, it remains a kind of lived-in display of contemporary paintings, photography, and sculptural works by artists she represents along with those she simply loves. We were lucky enough to visit recently and get to know Meloche a bit better.
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A table in Krantz’s studio laid out with works in progress and remnants of previous work. “I tend to make a lot more than what I’m going to need for a show because I don’t exactly know, in the moment, where things are going to go, so I end up editing out things that don’t really work. But I generally save them and sometimes they’re great in another context.”

Katy Krantz, Ceramicist

Katy Krantz likes to leave things to chance, at least when it comes to making ceramics. She has a method, but it involves working with a “wild and crazy collaborator” — a giant gas kiln that can fire clay at extremely high temperatures. “When you fire that high, the clay and glaze react in ways that are unpredictable. You get a lot of weird, random spotting, things that I would never be able to paint on.” That element of surprise and transformation runs through her colorful, abstract sculptural objects and jewelry, as well as her block prints and recent forays into fabric. Though she’ll establish “loose parameters” at the outset of a project, she says she’s “never been able to work with a real detailed plan in mind. I can work like that, but I tend to make really boring work that way. When I have too much control, it’s less interesting.”
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After looking for land for about a year, getting discouraged, and thinking they’d stay in their small place in central Austin, Fox and her husband were driving through Spicewood, Texas, when they saw a For Sale sign that said “View.” “We just started laughing, like yeah right. But we trudged our way up and we were like, ‘This is perfect!’” In the middle of the five-acre lot was a 20-foot ridge, where they built their simple yet stunning house: white stucco exterior, concrete floors, wall-length windows, and wood finishes. These doors open into one of the guest bedrooms.

Alyson Fox

When you consider the range of projects designer Alyson Fox has carried off, you might wonder if there’s anything she can’t do: prints, illustration, jewelry, clothing, textiles, not to mention a book of portraits. While Fox has degrees in photography and sculpture, she says she never really had a preconceived idea “of what I wanted to do or what it would look like.”
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Joliet and her Abyssinian cat, Hazel. “She has many fans. My mom started a Facebook page for her. I try not to pay attention because it’s mildly embarrassing. But she does have a hashtag: #Hazelcat.” Out the bedroom window, Joliet has a view of palm trees that line the edge of Elysian Park. “Dodger Stadium is just over the hill, so on Fridays during the season, when they have a home game, they do fireworks that you can see from my window. That’s kind of the magic of why I decided to live here.”

Laure Joliet, photographer

You could say that photographer Laure Joliet is in the image business, but her work is about depth as much as surface. She has a way with spaces, rendering them intimate and mysterious at the same time, capturing the revealing detail you notice out of the corner of your eye. Though her subject is often interiors, a large part of her job involves getting to know people. “I spend the day with them and find out things I don’t know that you would normally get to find out, what they’re passionate about. It feels really satisfying to have that experience.”
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The table where Norton keeps an evolving collection of materials — a piece of coral, a rock found at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house, wax hexagons from a previous installation — that serve as “inspiration or visual references” or might get used in future projects.

Heidi Norton, Artist

“Being a photographer and being an artist working with materials like resin, plants, and glass — those two worlds should not really mix,” says Heidi Norton. “You have the camera and you have film and you’re trying to keep things clean and archival, and then you have dirt and glass shards everywhere.” Such contradictions are at the core of Norton’s work, from the immaculate glow of her photography to the dirt-under-your-fingernails feel of her sculptural pieces, which typically feature houseplants in some form or another.
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