Sarah Ellison’s Stand Out New Collection Features the Stripe

A bold Memphis sensibility meets sunny Byron Bay ease in Australian designer Sarah Ellison’s new capsule collection “La Banda,” meaning “the stripe” in Italian. Bands of ash and walnut wood lay next to each other to create a striped pattern, and rounded and rectilinear silhouettes playfully and unexpectedly alternate. In fashion, the notion of “the stripe” has a rich and varied history — a history that Ellison, a former fashion designer and stylist, was no doubt aware of.
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Xanthe Somers Wants Us to Question Everything About Our Relationship With Domestic Objects

As a self-taught ceramicist, not knowing the "right" way to do things has led Somers down some experimental paths. Clay has become a medium for her to interrogate concepts beneath its fragile surface. As a contemporary ceramic sculptor, she describes her pieces as a satirical and questioning take on domestic objects. “We cannot treat domestic objects as inert beings; they have place and purpose and motivation,” she says. “Clay has a long history of being used for functional, domestic objects that are laden with political and social constructs."
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Two New Ways to See Vince Skelly’s Shaggy, Chainsaw-Carved Sculptures

Living in the Pacific Northwest, there's no shortage of timber. But rather than planing those native trees or turning them on the lathe, like so many of his peers, Vince Skelly uses a chainsaw to roughly sculpt each of his chairs, tables, or sculptures from a single block of wood. Skelly follows the grain and patterns inherent in each piece, inspired by antecedents that stretch from prehistoric megalithic dolmens to the sculptures of Brancusi, the paintings of Philip Guston, the cartoon sets of the Flintstones, and the carvings of JB Blunk.
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While on Lockdown at the Barbican, This Duo Made Brutalist Furniture Out of Moving Boxes and Other Scraps

A Space's new Barbican collection is a series of mirrors, lights, and tables whose name references the famed London housing estate where the studio's founders spent the past year living and making it. Having moved in last May, they conceived the series as an homage to their new surroundings, then sculpted it out of the materials available to them during lockdown, including moving boxes, food containers, and plaster of Paris ordered online.
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Meet the Site Helping You Discover New Designers and Artists — Starting With These 14

When it launched, Wescover was an index of places and spaces — the Ace Hotels, De Maria restaurant in New York, Hauser & Wirth in LA — annotated with the names of artists and designers whose work they contained. Now its goal is to foster the discovery of independent talents within its pages, primarily through contextual interior photography that helps bring their work to life. To give you a jumping off point for exploring the site, we've rounded up 14 of our favorite creators, both familiar and new.
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Wayne Pate’s Homeware Collections Are Inspired by Classical Motifs and Ancient Color Palettes

A magpie for references, American artist Wayne Pate is largely inspired by classical architecture, decor and interior design, whose shapes he abstracts and brings up to date; on his trips to Europe, he collects ceramic vessels and historical objects — lebrillos from Spain, terracotta pieces from Italy and Greece. His forays into homeware, then, are always a homecoming and his latest are a collection of decorative terracotta tiles in collaboration with Balineum, and a series of cashmere throws and pillows for Saved NY, both released in late 2020.
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These Two New Collections of Art Carpets Started Out As Actual Paintings

Art carpets are usually handmade, are expensive to produce, and aren't necessarily that easy to incorporate into the average interior, which keeps them in the realm of the rarefied. Every time I see a collection I like, I take extra notice. This winter I found two: one being the latest limited-edition collection from my favorite Australian brand Zou Zou, and one being a series of one-of-a-kind client commissions by London designer Sussy Cazalet, which she shot inside the gallery Beton Brut.
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The New Lambert & Fils New York Showroom is, Like the Brand Itself, an Incubator for Collaboration

To celebrate Lambert & Fils’s 10th anniversary back in early March, the Montreal-based brand’s founder, Samuel Lambert, traveled to New York City to sign a lease on a 1,500-sq.ft. space on the corner of Hudson and Duane Streets in Tribeca, fulfilling a longtime dream of opening a showroom in Manhattan. Of course, we all know what happens next: Within 24 hours of signing the lease, the city was in lockdown. “It was pretty much inked paper and then total chaos,” laughs Lambert’s brand and marketing director Rory Seydel. “But we took the challenge as a part of the process. What does a showroom even mean in 2021?”
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Tiled Furniture is Having a Moment, But These Pieces Are Unlike Anything You’ve Seen

We're certainly not the first people to tell you that tile furniture had something of a moment in 2020. But because of tile's inherent limitations, those pieces tend to have a certain sameness, even as their palettes and patterns change. That's why Tajimi Custom Tiles, a new brand based in the historic center of the Japanese tile industry, feels incredibly novel. To celebrate the launch of their custom-tailored tiles — and to showcase the brand's almost innumerable possibilities —Tajimi commissioned installations from Max Lamb and Kwangho Lee.
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