Portland Maine emerging artist Elizabeth Atterbury

An Artist Who Moves Shapes From Two Dimensions to Three

To understand the work of artist Elizabeth Atterbury — and how it's changed since we first profiled her almost exactly three years ago — look no further than the solo exhibition she had at Mrs. Gallery in New York this past spring: While she used to photograph the geometric compositions she created from sand, cut metal, or corrugated paper, those elements now appear both as two-dimensional images and as three-dimensional works in their own right.
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Inside the Quirky, Vintage-Inspired Home of Two Epic Design Collectors

We featured Wary Meyers' incredible trove of finds in our 2012 book Paper View, and we were delighted to see some of those items pop up in the house tour Curbed published this week, including the Alex Tavoularis painting Linda's parents picked up at a Florida estate sale and the abstract canvases John was creating at the time. We've been tracking their home — a 1960s-era ranch that was renovated in the '80s — on Instagram since the couple bought it three years ago, and these pictures show the space in its full glory.
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Elizabeth Atterbury, Artist

While the Maine-based artist Elizabeth Atterbury has done amazing things with just simple shapes cut into paper and steel, lately she's been getting a wee bit more ambitious — building a 3-by-4-foot sandbox in her studio and photographing compositions she's raked into it, or using a bandsaw to carve grill bricks into arcs and zigzags then documenting the crumbly results. Aside from photography — which she studied in school — she also exhibits sculptures in clay and painted wood. You can see them in person now through May 10 at Colby College Art Museum in Waterville, Maine, or pick up a copy of Atterbury's 2013 book with Bodega gallery, "In the Middle, an Oasis."
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Wary Meyers’ Candles

If you want to put too fine a point on it, you could say that John and Linda Meyers specialize professionally in obscurity. The couple run a brand and webshop called Wary Meyers, where they sell flea-market ephemera that often have a delightful but abstruse narrative attached, and their own goods like Gonks, which are handmade creatures for kids based on an old World War I British archetype. They also made themselves scarce a few years ago when John, a former visual merchandiser at Anthropologie, and Linda, an art director, picked up and left Manhattan for a quieter life in Portland, Maine. But as a young couple with a very young child, they felt increasingly that they ought to be investing their time in something that might one day become ubiquitous: “The thing with our company is we’ve always done a lot of one-offs and prototypes — things where we’ll make one item and then it’s like, ‘Well, how do we produce them somewhat cheaply and not in China?’” says Linda. “And everything we did before seemed slightly esoteric. We had a book where we did 50 DIY projects and people loved the products and were like, ‘Do you want to sell them?’ And it was kind of like, ‘Well, do you want to pay $1500 for a dresser?’” Which is why last week, the couple released their first — “dare I say mainstream?” jokes Linda — product: A line of scented candles with iconic-seeming packaging and incredibly inviting-sounding scents.
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