After looking for land for about a year, getting discouraged, and thinking they’d stay in their small place in central Austin, Fox and her husband were driving through Spicewood, Texas, when they saw a For Sale sign that said “View.” “We just started laughing, like yeah right. But we trudged our way up and we were like, ‘This is perfect!’” In the middle of the five-acre lot was a 20-foot ridge, where they built their simple yet stunning house: white stucco exterior, concrete floors, wall-length windows, and wood finishes. These doors open into one of the guest bedrooms.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL A. MULLER

When you consider the range of projects designer Alyson Fox has carried off, you might wonder if there’s anything she can’t do: prints, illustration, jewelry, clothing, textiles, not to mention a book of portraits. While Fox has degrees in photography and sculpture, she says she never really had a preconceived idea “of what I wanted to do or what it would look like.”

After getting her MFA at the University of Colorado, Fox went to work on visuals for Anthropologie before deciding to focus on her own practice, in particular her drawings. Her “fictional family album” — faceless figures at once familiar and unsettling — eventually caught the attention of Design Sponge. More accolades followed, along with commissions, and Fox has since collaborated on various editions with West Elm, H&M, Of A Kind, Ink Dish, and Hawkins New York (whose rugs with Fox we featured a few weeks back). She’s also been selling (and selling out of) limited runs of her statement-making yet easily wearable necklaces, under the label A Small Collection. This May, she’s aiming to expand that with a line of clothing, jewelry, and housewares made in partnership with artisans around the world.

Fox might modestly credit her success to “being on the right blog at the right time,” but her eye for line, color, and pattern has a whole lot to do with it — as does her curiosity and desire to experiment with different media and materials. “I think of it all as the same project, as one big piece it’s hard for me to break apart. Even though it may be a rug, it started as a drawing, and even though it’s a clothing line, I’m thinking about the way I want to photograph it even while I’m sketching. No matter what it is, I attack it in the same way.” Maybe it’s no surprise, then, that Fox designed and built her own home. With the help of family in the trade, she and her husband spent a year constructing it from scratch and in late 2012, they moved a half hour’s drive west of Austin to Spicewood, Texas. Not only does Fox now have spectacular hill country views, but after years of working at a little desk, she has her own studio where she can dream up what’s next.