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IMG_1686_opener
07.12.14
Saturday Selects
Week of July 7, 2014

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: ceramics from a graphic designer, paintings from a lighting designer, and the coolest $300 rock you’ve ever seen.

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07.11.14
Eye Candy
Studio Uribe’s FW14 Collection

We spotted the new London-based jewelry designers Studio Uribe on the shelves of one of our favorite boutiques, Hunting and Collecting in Brussels. Helmed by couple Sion and Tiffany Phillips, the brand recently launched its first collection for FW14, which pairs sleek 18K gold-plated brass with abstract striped-enamel and lapis lazuli accents. The pair say that their collaboration reflects their contrasting backgrounds — Sion being a Welsh branding veteran who’s worked with clients like Nike and BMW, and Tiffany being a Chilean-American accessories designer with Chanel, Kenzo, and Swarovski on her resume. After the jump are selections from their first lookbook, shot by Rosie Blake, as well as images from a special shoot Uribe did with Bella Howard, of the pieces placed alongside various plants.

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07.10.14
Studio Visit
Kate Miss

The fact that Los Angeles designer Kate Miss has, since we shot her Koreatown workspace last fall, chopped off her hair, adopted a dog, and moved studios not once but twice — the second time abandoning her freelance graphic design life altogether for a full-time position at Karen Kimmel — may tell you just how busy we’ve been around these parts. But it could just as easily be a reflection of how much Miss craves change. She’s the only person we’ve ever heard utter the words: “I love moving.” And yet that peculiarly peripatetic quality is what defines Miss — it’s what brought her from Seattle to New York and finally to LA, and why she’s equal parts known as a blogger, a photographer, a jewelry maker, and a graphic designer.

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07.09.14
The View From Here
David Taylor in Hälleförsnäs, Sweden

Every summer, the Stockholm-based, Scottish-born designer David Taylor retreats to his family’s cottage in the Swedish countryside for a spell and spends his days foraging in the woods. It isn’t greens and mushrooms he’s after, though, but slag — the decidedly un-edible clumps of waste compounds left behind in the production of metal. Taylor’s cottage happens to be in a town called Hälleförsnäs, also home to an iron foundry that was built in the 1600s and shut down for good in 2006. “Slag can still be found just about everywhere around here,” Taylor says. “It’s a worthless by-product that was produced in huge quantities and mostly just dumped out of sight in the forest for centuries.” For a recent project that debuted during the Saatchi Gallery’s Collect fair in May, Taylor gathered up chunks of the stuff and upcycled them into a series of colorful candlesticks.

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alltilesclosehome
07.08.14
Sighted
The Pattern Foundry

When the Pattern Foundry originally launched several years ago, it was essentially an open-source repository for hundreds of licensed archival patterns that could be purchased by users and applied any way they saw fit. But over the years, the UK-based company — run by Richard Rhys, a Central Saint Martins grad and former print designer for Alexander McQueen — has begun to use those patterns to create its own proprietary product line, primarily consisting of rugs and ceramic, silkscreened tiles. The company recently relaunched its website, which makes it even easier to view to dozens of combinations you can make with, say, the wave-like Tide pattern by Wim Crouwel, taken from a 1960s catalogue cover the Dutch designer created for artist Peter Struycken, or the triangular Duo pattern by graphic designer Karel Martens. The overly intellectual kitchen of your dreams awaits…

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07.07.14
Eye Candy
Kristina Krogh, Artist and Graphic Designer

Kristina Krogh studied graphic design before setting up her own studio in Copenhagen in 2012, where she spends part of her time on freelance design projects and the rest on her extensive line of limited-edition art prints, notebooks, and notecards, pictured in this post. Her layered geometric compositions feature a mix of contrasting and complementary surface textures taken from everyday materials like marble, ply, wood, cork, and paper. “My inspiration comes from the things that surround me: a beautiful old parquet, a perfect color combination on a building, a stone floor in a church, a bike ride through Copenhagen,” she says.

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07.03.14
At Home With
Brent Dzekciorius and Marine Hartogs, Design Curator and Gallerist

When fellow London-based design experts Brent Dzekciorius and Marine Hartogs fell in love, moved in together, and got married, their personal and professional lives meshed together in an enviably perfect way. Their stuff, however? Not so much. The pair had found an incredible Camden loft that was part of an enclave of former state-sponsored artists’ studios, each with 15-foot window walls and individual gardens, but it offered only 750 square feet into which they could cram the items they’d both accumulated as longtime design lovers and collectors. Hartogs worked for five years as a design specialist at Phillips before recently being named director of Galerie Kreo’s new London space, while Dzekciorius — known for his support of up-and-coming talents — did time at Johnson Trading Gallery, Moss, and Phillips before launching an architectural surfaces company this April. Needless to say, as moving day approached in the summer of 2012, they both knew something had to give.

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07.02.14
Eye Candy
Supreme Bon Ton’s Meteorite Collection

Suprême Bon Ton is a Paris-based textile design studio helmed by Ella Perdereau, who founded it last year after traveling around India and Latin America for creative inspiration. Her first collection, Meteorite, is a series of scarves that incorporate patterns and textures from rocks and minerals. Perdereau worked with traditional textile printers in Lyon to produce the scarves, then turned to the up-and-coming photographer Florent Tanet — known for playful pastel still-lives that have been featured in the New Yorker and Wired — to photograph them. Tanet also shot Perdereau’s collection of painted rocks and other reference objects, which are featured in the second half of the post.

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