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We Thought We Were Over Terrazzo Until We Saw This Epic Apartment in Lithuania

Why do some trends fizz out, while some stick around and — in many cases — keep coming back stronger year after year? Take terrazzo: We've been hawking that gorgeous, endlessly reconfigurable aggregate since at least 2013, but the design world's adoration of it has hardly waned in the six years since. Still, when you find an application that stops you in your tracks, it’s worth noting, which we happily did this week with an apartment in Lithuania by DO Architects.
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Symbols, Snakes, and Spirituality in a New Collection of Terrazzo Furniture

Carly Jo Morgan's debut furniture collection, which includes the Yin Yang Table (twin surfaces in pink and black, enhanced with brass inlay), the Cozy Club Chair (with optional sheepskin), and the zig-zagging Serpentine Heart Song Lamp, was unveiled at the new Los Angeles gallery Not So General on April 20th. Today, Morgan shares her thoughts on transformation, her toughest critic, the satisfaction of “deep” sisterhood, and faking it until you make it.
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Week of March 16, 2020

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: We continue to bring you the best of what we can see from the safety of our homes, including a chic alternative to terrazzo, a small-space focused furniture collection from Beirut, and a Vincent Van Duysen–designed Portuguese vacation compound (above) that looks pretty appealing right about now.
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Week of March 9, 2020

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: In the wake of worldwide lockdowns, we have exhibitions no one can visit, a restaurant that's had to delay its opening, and a showroom that's opened just as everyone is obligated to stay home. In other words, we'll be doing our best to continue to support these places online, and to bring you the best of what we can see from the safety of our homes.
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Week of March 2, 2020

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a scathing takedown of the millennial aesthetic, the first-ever museum exhibition on ASMR, and oh, a bunch of new design objects, too.
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Week of February 17, 2020

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: an ironically-named (and perfectly executed) wine bar-cum-bookshop, an Upper East Side duplex with downtown credentials, and the third, tousled-'70s version of Casa Perfect LA (above).
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American Design Hot List Robert McKinley

The 2019 American Design Hot List, Part V

This week we announced our seventh annual American Design Hot List, Sight Unseen’s editorial award for the 20 names to know now in American design. We’re devoting an entire week to interviews with this year’s honorees — get to know the next four Hot List designers here.
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The 2019 American Design Hot List, Part IV

This week we announced our seventh annual American Design Hot List, Sight Unseen’s editorial award for the 20 names to know now in American design. We’re devoting an entire week to interviews with this year’s honorees — get to know the next four Hot List designers here.
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Robert Sukrachand

New York, sukrachand.com Robert Sukrachand has made plenty of pieces we love — tables sheathed in Microsuede, mirrors built from dichroic glass — but this was the year he took giant shards of colored and antique mirror, laid them out in a haphazard pattern on benches made from composite stone, and called it “Mirazzo” — our favorite yet. What is American design to you, and what excites you about it? American design is exciting precisely because of its lack of rootedness. There is no overwhelming design tradition or ethos in our country and that forms a dynamic atmosphere in which to create in. We can absorb, digest, and rework stylistic influences and material techniques from near and far. The outcome can be profound or it can be a cacophony, but what could be more American than that? When I look around at my peers here in New York, I see a huge variety of pathways to a very diverse set of studio practices. What I mean is that the role of ‘designer’ feels much more blurred here than I’ve observed it to to be in other countries. Many of us aren’t even classically trained in design in any particular way. That disassociation from a particular school of thought leads to great creative freedom for the self starter. What are your plans and highlights for the upcoming year? I am so excited for 2020 because I am finally following through on a long term dream: to connect my two homes — the USA and Thailand — through the language of craft and design. We are inviting American designers to come to Thailand for a sort of ‘summer camp’ experience where they can learn and be inspired by the unique materials and processes there. We believe the resulting products will be a natural outgrowth of the material and craft conversations that surface in this exchange. First to partake in this journey is our friend and studio neighbor Pat Kim, whose process-driven work is well-suited for a collaboration with the woodturners, lacquer artisans, and brass casters we have identified in Northern Thailand. I’ll also be developing some new designs with a pottery village that uses a distinctly red local stone called laterite in their vessels. The second pillar of this new project is to introduce the most forward-thinking products from contemporary Thai designers to the American market. We hope to create a connection between … Continue reading Robert Sukrachand
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Week of December 16, 2019

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: A new decade may be dawning, but some trends might last all the way 'til the next one, including terrazzo (shown here in new vases), arches (in three different interiors), and a new favorite entrant — recessed shelves!
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