At a Los Angeles Gallery, Ceramic Fountains and a Living Room Rendered Entirely in Clay

For those of us who’ve gotten to know our homes and domestic spaces a little too well in the last couple of years, House and Garden, a joint installation of new work by Lily Clark and Analuisa Corrigan at Stroll Garden, offers a chance to refresh the familiar. At the LA gallery, Corrigan has rendered a living room of furnishings in clay while Clark has created a garden of working ceramic fountains staged with live plant vignettes by Alice Lam of A.L. BASA. All of it Invites you to pause and give a second thought to what seems ordinary and everyday and then think yet again.
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Sean Gerstley is Playing With Scale at New York’s Tiniest New Design Gallery

When we first started writing about ceramic furniture back in 2014 — first with Chris Wolston's terracotta chairs, then on through to Eny Lee Parker, Kelsie Rudolph, Floris Wubben, Virginia Sin, BZIPPY, and more — we had no idea we would end up here: in Superhouse's new, 100 sq.ft. vitrine/gallery on the second floor of a Chinatown mall, filled to bursting with more than a dozen such works by the young designer Sean Gerstley, whose process and aesthetic we can only describe as simply thrilling.
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Meet Kelsie Rudolph, Our Newest Ceramic Furniture Crush

Ceramic artist Kelsie Rudolph glazes her adventurous creations in color combinations that just about make her skin crawl. She does this to better grasp color’s effect on us. On vessels, sculptures and, more recently, larger furniture pieces like benches and chairs, the striking pairings jig across her work in stripes, zig-zags and checkerboard. “I’m really intrigued by the way color and pattern are able to make each other move," she says.
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Virginia Sin Can Make Literally Anything Out of Ceramic

Virginia Sin has been working out of her Brooklyn studio since she moved to New York from Los Angeles years ago, and her ceramics and housewares — typically made from neutral-colored, hand-built clay — have often caught our eye at trade shows and on sites like Need Supply. But her most recent collection takes the Brooklyn ceramicist to a whole other level; in it, Sin tests the structural limits of clay by creating thinly rolled table bases and shelf supports from unglazed stoneware.
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