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You’ll Never Guess Which European Metropolis Inspired Svenja Deininger’s Latest Body of Work

Sometimes the reason you are drawn to one piece of art or another is obvious. In the case of Viennese artist Svenja Deininger — who opens "Crescendo," her third solo exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery, this Thursday — we could say it is because her work falls somewhere pleasingly on the spectrum between figurative and abstract. At its most abstract, it resembles the color-field painters we espouse so heartily on this site; at its most figurative, there is something almost Hockney-esque about her canvases. But sometimes the reason you are drawn to one piece of art or another reveals itself to you only later.
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Parisian art gallery Zeuxis

In Paris, An Art Gallery Takes Over a Townhouse — Permanently

Like Maniera in Brussels or Salon 94 in New York, the new Parisian art gallery Zeuxis takes works out of the traditional white cube gallery context to exhibit them in a more intimate space; by allowing visitors to imagine themselves living in real time with the objects on display, it makes art and design a bit more accessible.
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7. Los Feliz #1_opener

In These Photos, An Abstract Los Angeles is Even Prettier Than The Real Thing

An expert at making a beautiful image out of banal surfaces and unassuming scenery — the side of a Zankou Chicken, say, or a bus station in Chinatown — Australian-born photographer George Byrne's work has a way of evoking strong feelings from simple Los Angeles palms and awnings. Byrne's first solo exhibition, opening this month in New York at Olsen Gruin — entitled“New Order” — is made up of 15 photographs of Los Angeles by way of crisp shadows, a lot of seafoam green, the clear blue sky, and pops of dusty pink.
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Nationale Portland gallery

This Portland Gallery Has Shown Only Female Artists Since the Beginning of 2017

Nationale is an art gallery in Portland, Oregon that represents eight emerging artists: four male, and four female. But since the beginning of 2017, the gallery has shown three female artists in quick succession — Amy Bernstein, a painter; Francesca Capone, a textile artist; and Emily Counts, a sculptor; whose work is everything we look for in a Sight Unseen subject — colorful, multidisciplinary, and meaningful. And while directors May Barruel and Gabi Lewton-Leopold swear that the suddenly gendered roster wasn't purposeful, it certainly feels refreshing in the current climate.
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RMO-Install12_opener

Abstract Geometric Paintings That Fold, Like Origami, Into Three Dimensions

On view at The Hole now, "Fourteen Paintings" is the first New York solo show for Louisiana-born, Los Angeles–based artist Robert Moreland, who in fact creates work that exists more in the space between painting and sculpture — three-dimensional canvases made from drop-cloths, tacks, leather hinges, and acrylic paint, that are hardly paintings at all but rather painted objects that explore how line and color can be disrupted by volume.
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