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A New Collection of Steel and Stone Chairs That Combine Minimalism With Personality

The work of Danish interior and product designer Lisette Rutzou is characterized by a funny sleight of hand — at first you think you're looking at something really classical and elemental, and then you realize she's snuck in a whole other aesthetic language, more vibey and directional than you initially understood. Her newest collection of chairs and benches, Ego, has that same feeling.
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All the New Things We’re Coveting From Bolia, The CB2 of Europe

From an American perspective, Bolia looks something like the CB2 of Europe, but possibly better, partnering as they do with top-notch designers like Vera & Kyte, MUT Design Studio, and Meike Harde and ably translating trends into something truly covetable. Their latest collection is no exception.
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This Instagram Turns Design Trends Into Visual Compositions

A few weeks back, we got a notification from an account called @magerlife that stopped us in our tracks: Run by 25-year-old Danish stylist Martin Ager, who's been doing sales and visual merchandising for Hay for the past three years, the feed presents visual collages of objects that are related in some way, be it form, material, or motif. The reason Ager tagged us? A significant amount of his source material is pulled, regularly, from Sight Unseen.
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KONTO, Installation and Product Designers

KONTO is a collaborative installation, interior, and product design project by two Danish creatives, artist Morten Bencke and textile designer Elizabeth Kiss. The pair make things like lamps and trivets, but our favorite projects of theirs are more abstract, like the pastel totem pictured below, created for a friend's music video, or the experimental sculptural series Montage 1, featured in the rest of this post. The pair describe their work as "based on light, balance, curiosity and colors" — check out more of it after the jump.
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Kristina Krogh, Artist and Graphic Designer

Kristina Krogh studied graphic design before setting up her own studio in Copenhagen in 2012, where she spends part of her time on freelance design projects and the rest on her extensive line of limited-edition art prints, notebooks, and notecards, pictured in this post. Her layered geometric compositions feature a mix of contrasting and complementary surface textures taken from everyday materials like marble, ply, wood, cork, and paper. "My inspiration comes from the things that surround me: a beautiful old parquet, a perfect color combination on a building, a stone floor in a church, a bike ride through Copenhagen," she says.
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Two-wheelers: “Once I designed the Copenhagen and it turned out to be popular, Puma asked me to design something for them as well, and then suddenly I had a design career. I followed four principles: One is that all of the parts should be integrated so the bike seems like one object. Another is that it looks iconic. It also needs to be easy to maintain, because you don’t expect to go to the car mechanic every other day, but with a bike that’s what you sometimes end up doing. The last is useability — if you transfer the paradigm of bikes to cars, it would be like having two stick shifts, and we would never accept that. Apart from those ideas, Biomega is run like an Italian furniture company: This is what I believe the world needs, and this is how it’s gonna be.”

Jens Martin Skibsted of Biomega

As the founder and creative director of Biomega, Copenhagen's Jens Martin Skibsted is one of the most respected names in bicycle design. But to hear him tell the story of how he got there, you'd think he'd done everything in his power to avoid that fate. After believing for most of his life that he would grow up to be a poet, he decided to study film in Paris — "writing sci-fi movies about giant ants" — then dropped it altogether and took up philosophy for six years. It was during that time that he took a trip to Barcelona with his girlfriend and was struck by the random conviction that he ought to start a company making city bicycles. "I started drawing bikes, but tried to forget about it because I have so many ideas, and I can’t do everything," recalls Skibsted, who as a child filled notepads with inventions like chopsticks connected at one end, many of which he says exist now. "But this was one idea I couldn't really forget."
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