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Egg Collective’s Designing Women Exhibition is This Week’s Must-Visit

Perhaps it was inevitable that this year's NYCxDesign would focus so heavily on women. After all, the works on view this month were in many cases developed within the last half a year or so — a time when womanhood itself has been under attack in America. What this means for design is that over the next few weeks, we'll see, among other things, an all-female exhibition at Chamber Gallery, two brand-new female designers launching at Sight Unseen OFFSITE in a special capsule section, and Designing Women, an exhibition that opened this Monday, curated by Egg Collective and featuring 16 New York–based female artists and designers.
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Jose Davila Creates Sculptures From Glass, Stones, and Gravity

Using simple materials like stone and cardboard, Mexican artist Jose Dávila mines art history to create some of the most relevant works today. His oeuvre is defined by a diverse, medium-traversing output, from his precariously balanced sculptural arrangements to his “cutout” series, in which he extracts the focal point of iconic works of art, creating an absence that bestows a three-dimensionality upon the resulting pieces. In all of his art, there is an underlying exploration of how the modernist movement continues to influence the modern mind.
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Week of March 27, 2017

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week was all about things we couldn't resist posting: a teeny tiny Milan fair sneak peek, lamps that are so bad they're good, an iridescent yoga studio, and an admittedly cliche interior full of zigzags and pink (above). Hey, we're only human.
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Brian Rideout Makes Art For Design Lovers

Brian Rideout's American Collection Paintings are meant to transform the interiors images he finds in old decorating books and magazines into archival records of time and place: “A contemporary reference to the Flemish collection paintings of the early 17th century, American Collection Paintings … aims to reorient these glossy commercial examples into historical documents,” he says.
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Design and Art Are More Connected Than Ever at New York’s Newest Gallery

Whither Johnson Trading Gallery? The New York design gallery — which in its heyday introduced an American audience to the work of contemporary designers like Max Lamb, Kwangho Lee, Katie Stout, Aranda/Lasch, and more (not to mention Rafael de Cárdenas's epic first furniture collection) — had been relatively quiet of late. Now we know why: Earlier this month, it was announced that while JTG will continue selling vintage work, the contemporary artists in their stable will be absorbed into a new program at one of our favorite art galleries, Salon 94.
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Week of March 6, 2017

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: linoleum gets a big thumbs up, a dive bar in a Super 8 motel gets a jaw-dropping reinvention, and a master of Dutch design gets a beautifully designed retrospective (above).
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30 Artists and Galleries We Loved During New York Art Week 2017

We can't quite put our finger on what it was that made this year's Armory Arts Week feel so fresh. Was it the new venues? After all, NADA moved from Basketball City to Skylight Clarkson North, while Spring/Break moved from the old Post Office to an ex-Condé Nast office at 4 Times Square. Was it the fresh blood — the fact that NADA was even there at all, after years of coinciding with May's Frieze Fair? Or maybe it was simply the weather — we made the rounds on a gorgeously sunny Thursday that made the views at Spring Studios' Independent fair even more glorious. Whatever the case, we found much to love
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These $50 Posters Are a Serious Score

This week marked the launch of yet another great inexpensive poster series on yet another great art site, created by the multi-disciplinary Danish design studio Atelier CPH. The images were inspired by 70s colors and abstracted faces, and they look like something you'd be psyched to unearth at an antique mall for five times the price. These are only 49 to 89 Euros each, and they come with the cache of a creative duo whose clients include Kinfolk, Ferm Living, and Norm Architects.
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Matt Paweski Chose Art Over Design — But We Forgive Him

Years ago, when we first profiled Matt Paweski, we got really excited about his colorful furniture, but alas, it was not to be: Paweski's roots have always been in art, and art is what's occupied his portfolio pretty much ever since. His newest body of work, which went on view today at Herald St. gallery in London, features sculptures any designer could appreciate.
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Pettersen & Hein at Etage Projects

The Tinted, Tiled Concrete Floor We’re Coveting (And an A+ Collection of Art Objects to Boot)

“We shape our furniture, and afterwards the furniture shapes us.” This is the guiding principle behind Pettersen & Hein’s exhibition Home at Etage Projects, a reimagining of utilitarian design objects as art. Lea Hein and Magnus Pettersen (whose Flat Hat Man is one of our favorite finds from this year’s Stockholm Design Week) are the duo behind the work, which examines the hierarchy of functioning and nonfunctioning objects in the context of the home.
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Week of January 23, 2017

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: new good things like a pastel-colored jewelry store and an insanely affordable geometric rug, plus a few old good things like a marbled chair, a terrazzo table, and the glass-legged beauty pictured above.
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Sunset-Inspired Color Fades Meet Slabs of Marble In This Stunning Paris Exhibition

The Belgian painter Pieter Vermeersch has been known to fill rooms with soft, colorful gradients that define architectural space in beautifully strange ways, bordering on optical illusion. Both those works and his new canvases, on view now at Galerie Perrotin, dovetail with Vermeersch's professional origins in photography in the way they deal with light and perspective — but the new works physically ground all that ethereal color with panels of heavy marble.
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