Objects for Objects

In LA, A Weekend-Long Show Cheekily Called “Object Permanence”

Two weekends ago, a group of Los Angeles–based designers came together to interpret the candlestick in the first iteration of "Object Permanence," a new, quarterly event co-curated by designer Leah Ring of Another Human and Emma Holland Denvir, head of Hem's U.S. business development. Hosted at Hem’s Los Angeles showroom, the selection of designers and their objects follows a recent trend of reimagining near-relics like the ashtray, the bookend, and the paperweight, in which each object represents a tiny distillation of its designer's aesthetic.
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Milan Preview: Jorge Penadés’ Aquatic-Inspired Aluminum Vases

Jorge Penadés has been popping up on our radar a lot lately, and the Spanish designer’s latest move is a collaboration with the manufacturer BD Barcelona, a furniture brand known for its extensive design catalogue and pioneering technology in aluminum extrusion dating all the way back to the 1970s. Entitled Piscis, the six different vases are made from extruded aluminum profiles, converted from the offcuts of old tables and shelves (including those by Konstantin Grcic) produced over the last 50 years in BD Barcelona's factory.
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Designer, Painter, Sculptor, Architect — This Parisian Multihyphenate is About To Be Everywhere

The Instagram bio of Paris-based designer Garance Vallée once included the designation “HumanCreativeRomantic;” a quick scroll through her works, and painter, illustrator, jewelry designer, sculptor, and furniture designer could all easily be included as well. Vallée is a quintuple threat who recently completed her master’s degree in architecture and scenography, where she focused on concrete pieces, or what she considers “objects as small architecture.” But whichever medium she’s in, Vallée seems equally at home.
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A New England Studio Shakes Off Its Traditional American Vernacular

O&G, the Rhode Island–based studio lead by creative director and co-founder Jonathan Glatt, has been riffing on traditional American furniture for a long time; they're best known for their updated Windsor-style chairs, benches, and settees, often dyed in brilliant hues, from a kelp-like green to a lapis blue. Their two newest collections, however, look to a different set of influences.
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We Thought We Were Over Terrazzo Until We Saw This Epic Apartment in Lithuania

Why do some trends fizz out, while some stick around and — in many cases — keep coming back stronger year after year? Take terrazzo: We've been hawking that gorgeous, endlessly reconfigurable aggregate since at least 2013, but the design world's adoration of it has hardly waned in the six years since. Still, when you find an application that stops you in your tracks, it’s worth noting, which we happily did this week with an apartment in Lithuania by DO Architects.
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These Textured, 3D-Rendered Interiors Are a Study in Abstraction

In their three-dimensionally rendered landscapes, Terzo Piano keeps creating images for worlds we only wish were real. The latest project from the Italian-based agency, with styling by Elisabetta Bongiorni, zooms in a bit from their typical room settings, giving us highly textured elements that beg to be touched.
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A New Ceramics Collection Wants to Sand Down the Edges of Brutalism

Founded by Orion Janeczek, a graphic designer and stylist from Portland, Oregon, New Material's first collection is called Brutalism for Lovers — i.e. thick slabs made cuddly in the form of footed trays and planters, tubetop vases, and a dinnerware set that are all sorts of chunky, cute, and slightly absurd.
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In a New Series, 3D-Rendered Anthuriums Look (Unsurprisingly) Just Like the Real Thing

Appropriately called Digibana, the series finds Anders Brasch-Willumsen exploring the Japanese art of arranging flowers in a digital context, created by way of 3D-rendering software that keeps the flora alive forever. “I like to think of this series as a futuristic Ikebana practice,” Brasch-Willumsen says, “where moments of beauty are created and preserved only by a constant stream of likes and shares.”
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