Guide to Mexico City

A Tour of Mexico City’s Secret Spots With One of Its Biggest Tastemakers

Despite being a recent transplant, Su Wu — who rose to prominence as a writer and curator with her cult-favorite blog I’m Revolting — is already a fixture on the local art and design scene in Mexico City. Spending the day with her would be a dream assignment for any design writer, or really anyone who considers themselves a fan of good things and great stories. From her family home to an all-but-lost Noguchi mural tucked away above a bustling downtown market, Wu’s vision of Mexico City stays true to her own compelling vernacular.
More
Radius-Group2

Week of July 9, 2018

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: David Hockney inspires a poke spot — of all places — in Berlin, Roll & Hill reopens its New York showroom with a stellar new line-up, and two OFFSITE alums open up their respective Brooklyn apartments, furnished in works of their own making.
More
ZETTELER_SELLA CONCEPT_OMAR'S PLACE_Photography by Nicholas Worley_03open

In Dreary London, A Mediterranean Eatery Inspired By the Sun

Are there new restaurants out there that aren't inspired by the seaside? First we had the Italian Riviera, then the Sydney coast, and now Omar's Place — a restaurant located smack in the middle of London but inspired by the Mediterranean. The interior was shaped by Sella Concept, a London-based female design duo whose concept for the space started with idea of the sun — the defining element of Mediterranean lifestyle.
More
_MG_0202_opener

A Concrete and Pastel Oasis in Spain

Normally we'd dismiss an all-concrete restaurant as a terrible idea — too Meatpacking District circa Sex and the City, too cold and impersonal — but a submission we received today, from the Spanish architecture firm Lucas y Hernández-Gil, may have just opened our minds a little bit. Their interior for Casaplata restaurant in Seville, Spain, softens the chilly material with saturated colors, pale untreated woods, and tactile materials like velvet and perforated metal.
More
chic Parisian hotels boutique interior design

Meet The In-Demand Interior Designer Redefining Parisian Chic

Dorothée Meilichzon had worked in Paris for just five years before she founded her eponymous design studio in 2009 at the age of 27. Since then, she’s become one of the most in-demand interior designers in the French capital — as well as 2015’s designer of the year at Maison & Objet — despite maintaining a full-time staff of only three. Her work focuses on hotels, restaurants, and bars — the “fun places,” as she calls them, done in a style that is decidedly of-the-moment but grounded in color and texture and marked by an exquisite attention to detail and a love for metals, wood, and stone.
More
Ceramics: "For centuries, British porcelain makers were fascinated with Asian-style ceramics, so it's interesting to see people applying this old idea in new ways," says O'Neal. The artist Brendan Lee Tang, for example, sculpts playful, Manga– and pop-art-inspired armatures around what appear to be traditional Chinese Ming Dynasty vases.

AvroKo’s Anglo-Asian Influences

For the designers behind AvroKo, the New York firm known for its high-concept restaurant interiors, the most personal projects often start out as group obsessions. Lately, apropos of nothing, they’ve been compiling a collection of silent video clips featuring modern furniture or architecture, snipped from movies or pulled from obscure design archives. So far it’s just a game — “a meme floating around the office,” as partner Kristina O’Neal puts it — but the first time the team was so possessed, they began with a bank of photographs and ended up opening a restaurant. After securing several projects in Asia a few years back, they began carefully documenting the bizarre cultural mash-ups they found while on trips out East, from mangled English translations to neon-lit religious altars; in 2008 they opened Double Crown in New York's East Village as an homage to their Anglo-Asian fascination, with food evoking the 19th-century British occupation of India, China, and Singapore. With a new AvroKo office in Hong Kong fielding projects like the recently opened New York–style eatery Lily in Bloom, their anthropological depository keeps growing.
More