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30 Designers and Brands We Loved at Stockholm Design Week 2019

People often ask about our favorite furniture fairs (besides Milan and New York, of course), and we've always reflexively said Stockholm, due to the elevated baseline of good taste and sheer quality of work that tends to emerge from the Scandinavian capital. But in truth, neither Monica nor I had been to Stockholm Design Week in more than a decade. And as easy as it is journalistically to report a fair from afar these days, it's impossible to replicate the emotional high that comes from discovering something amazing where you least expected it. Having just returned from a leisurely weeklong stay in Stockholm, I'm happy to report that our instincts were correct: Stockholm remains one of the most vital and exciting stops on the design calendar.
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Why is This Early 1900s Swedish Minimalist Suddenly All Over Instagram?

We’re not sure when it was that we first started noticing the late Swedish designer Axel Einar Hjorth popping up everywhere we looked. But whenever it was, you can now consider us full converts to the church of Hjorth, whose work remains disarmingly fresh 60 years after his death, mixing as it does both Art Deco and Modernist influences, and a sense of sophistication with something more primitive.
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In a New Series, 3D-Rendered Anthuriums Look (Unsurprisingly) Just Like the Real Thing

Appropriately called Digibana, the series finds Anders Brasch-Willumsen exploring the Japanese art of arranging flowers in a digital context, created by way of 3D-rendering software that keeps the flora alive forever. “I like to think of this series as a futuristic Ikebana practice,” Brasch-Willumsen says, “where moments of beauty are created and preserved only by a constant stream of likes and shares.”
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Furniture Made With Everything From Chipboard to Concrete

For last month's Malmöfestivalen, a creative arts weekend in Sweden, design collective Malmö Upcycling Service created an installation and furniture collection using waste from local industries — from textile boat covers to chipboard, rusty metals to polyester foam.
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A Swedish Artist’s Gravity-Defying Stone Sculptures

Swedish artist Malou Palmqvist's wabi-sabi stacks of organic shapes are a studied interpretation of the scattered pieces of waste that wash ashore near her home in the Swedish archipelago. The textured forms — stoneware, wood carvings, and combinations of stone with plaster to create a marbled effect — are at once hefty and delicate, subtly clashing and full of whimsy.
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A 3D-Rendered Dreamscape in Inescapably Pleasing Pink

“A Lucid Dream in Pink, Sleep Cycle No 1­7,” by Swedish art director Anders Brasch-Willumsen, combines balloon-like lights, terrazzo surfaces, and occasional plants in spaces that could be galleries and showrooms just as easily as they could exist in the mind.
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A Swedish Design Collective Turning Factory Waste Into Covetable Objects

Who knew a collection of waste — from industries spanning across southern Sweden — could come together in such a beautiful way? Using glass, sheet metal, acrylic, stone, and brick, a design collective called Malmö Upcycling Service has created a collection of household goods and decorative objects, from a circular standing mirror to a series of vases with interchangeable glass parts.
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This 128-Year-Old Swedish Rug Company Has Made Some of the Coolest Rugs of 2017

Much has changed in the 128 years since Kasthall debuted as the fist industrial rug factory in Sweden — but then again, some things have remained the same. The company’s woven and hand-tufted rugs are still produced in Kasthall’s original factory. Craftsmanship and high-quality materials remain hallmarks of the brand. And sustainable production has been a point of pride all along. It’s this consistency that has kept customers coming back since 1889, and it’s what’s made Kasthall a fixture in so many homes, retail spaces, hotels, and restaurants. But over the years, the company’s interest in innovation — and its just-minimalist-enough aesthetic — has attracted new generations of design enthusiasts as well.
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In a New Show, Hilda Hellström Blurs the Line Between What is Real and What is Fake

When we first interviewed Swedish designer Hilda Hellström back in 2012, just two weeks after her graduation from London's Royal College of Art, the designer drew an interesting distinction between her work and that of her peers: While so many Hellström's age were obsessed with the properties of different materials, she was more interested in the possibilities of narrative. But a funny thing happened in the five years that have elapsed since then: Hellström hasn't been able shake her fascination with pigmented Jesmonite, the acrylic-based plaster she originally used in her breakout Sedimentation vases.
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Swedish designer Erik Olovsson

This Former Acne Art Director Makes Furniture With a Graphic Eye

When we first encountered Swedish designer Erik Olovsson two years ago in the basement of Rossana Orlandi, he had but two products to his name — a wavy-lined metal and marble clothes rack and a modular, geometric shelving unit, both created in collaboration with his fellow graduate and graphic designer Kyuhyung Cho. Since then, Olovsson has been developing and tinkering with the beautiful projects he's unveiling in Milan this week.
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