1DZEKxFormafantasma_ExCinere_1©Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti.

The Best Thing We Saw in Milan Today, Day 3

After five years, Dzek — you know, the makers of your favorite terrazzo kitchen — returned to the fair with another architectural material with a vast applications: Called Ex-Cinere, it's a collection of tiles — with serious 70s vibes — developed in collaboration with Formafantasma, stemming from the Dutch-based duo's longtime exploration into volcanic rock.
More
Opener_Sarah Ellison_Location21

In Her Debut Collection, Sarah Ellison Channels the ’70s Through a Distinctly Australian Lens

Armed with years of research, Australian stylist and designer Sarah Ellison debuted her first collection of furniture late last year, inspired by the playful proportions of '70s. In her pieces, these references are reinterpreted through a distinctly Australian lens, with colors and textures from the coastline captured through material choices such as travertine, mirrored glass, ceramic, and linen.
More
Sally Breer up-and-coming interior designer

At Home With Sally Breer, LA’s Coolest Up-and-Coming Interior Designer

For someone who spends her working hours designing the interiors for many of Hollywood’s “successful young hustlers,” Sally Breer needed her own home to provide a neutral palette and be ideal for “clean head space.” But beige and softness — aka comfort — can still be stunning for a designer like Breer, who describes herself with words like absurd, ballsy, and passionate.
More
"More multi-level living found in the Milanese home of architect Mario Scheinchenbauer. This tonal and textural environment is timeless. Love the secret floor panels to hide the clutter. The stairs are just stunning, a sculpture."

Alex P. White, Artist

When we first met Brooklyn artist Alex P. White, it was in his role as a co-conspirator with interior designer Kelly Behun, with whom he'd created one of the most genius furniture collections in recent memory. But we've since gotten to know him as much, much more — as an interior designer and artist in his own right (whose playful project names include Playshroom and Wytchbytchru); as a designer whose latest furniture collection will debut in two weeks at Sight Unseen OFFSITE; and as the proprietor of a wonderfully specific Instagram feed, where we first stumbled upon this book in his rather extensive printed archive. When we asked him to write about Underground Interiors for our recurring From the Library column, we had no idea we'd get such a fun, deeply personal romp through its pages. If you're into conversation pits, wall-to-ceiling carpeting, elephant side tables, geometric travertine, or tubular steel, we suggest you read on in full.
More
Vintage and hand-crafted jewelry: When I arrived, Lee was wearing an amazing, architectural, mixed-metal cuff, which turned out to be the work of Anndra Neen, the Mexico City–born, New York–based jewelry-making sisters who made their TenOverSix debut last month. (That’s their necklace above as well.) The sisters hand-craft pieces made from copper, brass, and nickel silver at their workshop in Mexico City. “We actually just did shoe collaboration with them, with all of these little metal pieces on the front of the shoe,” Lee says.

Fashion Designer Kristen Lee of TenOverSix

Most people, if given the luxury of a third bedroom in a house they share only with a spouse, might choose to turn it into a guestroom, or a studio, or maybe a study. Kristen Lee, a stylist and co-owner of L.A.’s fashion and design emporium TenOverSix, turned hers into a walk-in closet. Step inside and you’ll discover rolling racks of designer and vintage, scarves tossed carelessly around a dress form, shoes lined up in neat little rows, a steamer in the corner, and accessories spilling out over the dresser. And yet for someone so clearly attuned to and obsessed with fashion, it’s not the clothes you first sense when you enter the Ed Fickett–designed, mid-century, Nichols Canyon home she bought last year with her husband and then “renovated the shit out of,” as she says. It’s the incredible proliferation of art. Stephen Shore, Banksy, Leopold Seyffert, Nan Goldin — and that’s just in the living room.
More
swatek1

In a Box by Swatek Romanoff

There are more than 20,000 instances of great graphic design housed in the AIGA’s online archives, but for every Pushpin or Chiat\Day, there’s a Swatek Romanoff — a firm that churned out loads of wonderful work in its ’70s/’80s heyday but that isn’t the subject of much chatter among today’s design circles. When we were first putting together ideas for this site, it was Randall Swatek and David Romanoff’s whimsical 1979 “In a Box” series that inspired this column.
More