At Barber Osgerby’s Galerie Kreo Exhibition, An Exploration of the Artisanal and the Industrial

Though the London-based studio Barber Osgerby first started working with Galerie Kreo more than half a decade ago, with their monolithic, shinto shrine–inspired Hakone collection of tables, last month marked their debut as a solo exhibitor. In a show called Signal, on view until April 16, the London duo finally gets to show off their impeccable color sense, which has always seemed a natural fit with Galerie Kreo's aesthetic.
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Tour the Unbelievable 1930s Color-Blocked Fantasy Interior Hiding Inside a Simple Brick Building in Belgium

The modernist pioneer Jozef Schellekens was the public architect of Turnhout, a Belgian town halfway between Antwerp and Eindhoven, where he worked on schools and city halls. But his best-known and greatest work was his own house, a 1935 rectangular brick-and-glass structure whose simplicity belies the expressiveness of its interior, where Schellekens created a colorful world full of bespoke built-in furniture and other functional and decorative details.
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Week of September 20, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: tables inspired by California's kidney-shaped pools, Gustaf Westman's latest furniture drop, and a colorful installation by Germans Ermics at last week's Design Miami Basel show (above).
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With Prints Inspired By Art-Store Pen-Test Doodles, These Curtains Are ‘Free and Wild’

Sarah Illenberger has a talent for recontextualizing everyday items in ways that are deceptively simple, yet at the same time so clever that there's an irresistible kind of magic in it. The same is true for her new collaboration with Danish textile purveyor Kvadrat, a series of three vibrant curtain panels created by scanning the little pads of paper people test pens on in stationery stores — the unremarkable made remarkable, through little more than a flash of creative inspiration and a change in scale.
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Sean Gerstley ceramics

Sean Gerstley’s Clay Objects Live In A World Of Their Own

Following the trajectory of Delaware-born artist and designer Sean Gerstley’s practice, it feels a bit like he’s always, intentionally, scaling down. “I went to Rhode Island School of Design for architecture before finding ceramics,” he says of his creative coming-of-age. “As a kid I was, and still am, super interested in interior spaces. My ceramic practice started as sculptural work that was kind of about interiors and domestic space in abstract-installation form.”
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Week of March 29, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a reissued Memphis classic, a new hotel in Baja, and a cache of European ceramic finds, including this mug with #tinyballs.
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Note Design Studio office interior

Perhaps More People Would Want to Return to the Office If It Looked Like This

There's been copious hand-wringing since the pandemic began about how people have adjusted to working from home, how WFH might actually be preferable to returning to the office, and what it all means. We would venture to guess that more people would be willing to return to their offices if they looked like this, a new London interior by Note Design Studio for The Office Group.
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Justin Morin’s Silk Draperies Reference Pop Culture and Natural Phenomena in Equal Measure

Justin Morin’s printed silk installations take many forms — some unfurl dramatically against an expansive gallery wall; others are cinched and pleated like couture; still others are knotted, tied, looped, bunched, gathered, or, simply hang listlessly like a flag. Morin’s specific visual vocabulary, developed over the course of a decade since he created his first printed silk work in 2011, proposes that anything and everything in our information-dense and visually overwrought world can be unraveled and represented in sensual, gradient silk.
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The Colorful Vintage Design Book We Return to Again and Again for Inspiration

We know objectively that the start of the year is generally a time of renewal and a time to birth new projects. But to be honest, this is often the time of year when we feel most low and uninspired, which may be why we often turn to books in our own libraries for energy. I often come back to Interiors in Color, a 1983 book translated from Italian that features interiors by many of that era's best-known players.
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Week of August 17, 2020

This week: The $195 acrylic table of our dreams, new lamps by the likes of Toad Gallery and Bijoy Jain, and a drop-dead gorgeous pink stucco house in Mallorca that's one with its surroundings (above).
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Fall is Coming. Here Are 36 Sculptural Candles to Make Working From Home a Bit Cozier.

What is happening in the candle world? It seems like only a few years ago that everyone got on board again with tapers, which were once relegated only to formal dining rooms and Victorian-era cosplay. Now, not only are tapers available in every color of the rainbow, but you can also find candles in nearly any form you can imagine, from a female torso, to waxed Italian fruit, to ropes, yin-yangs, and Romanesco broccoli — all imbued with a sophistication and color palette that lifts them beyond their mall gift-store origins.
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