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A New Lighting Collection Inspired By the 1960s Modernism of Fire Island Pines

“Growing up, I always love stained glass,” recalls Peter B. Staples, discussing the early design experiments that would eventually lead to the launch of his lighting brand Blue Green Works. “I grew up in a Craftsman-style home, and one summer, my dad and I found the plans for the original stained glass lanterns. We taught ourselves how to fix and recreate them. I was probably 12 at the time and that experience really stayed with me.” But while the exercise was clearly formative, Staples would have to take a circuitous path through the New York design scene before returning to lighting. Having previously worked at The Future Perfect and Apparatus, Blue Green Works marks the first time Staples has designed a collection himself — which you would never guess just by looking at it.
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The Dutch Designer Making Colorful, Jewel-Like Cocktail Glasses

For years, de Beijer designed purely ornamental vessels made from synthetic and non-traditional materials like resin and pigmented polyurethane cast by hand. "People have frequently asked me why I didn't make these vessels in 'real' glass,” he said. And so he did. Designing out of his father’s studio and working in close collaboration with the renowned glassblowers at Van Tetterode Glass Studio in Amsterdam, de Beijer has created his first series of glassware made exclusively for Side Gallery.
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Peter Gudrunas Has Been Blowing Glass Since the 1970s. Now His Daughter is Helping to Bring Their Practice Into the 21st Century.

The 2008 financial crisis wiped out the majority of Gudrunas’ clients, and in the following years the interest in buying fine crafts sputtered. It wasn’t until 2014 that the business was revived, when his youngest daughter, artist and filmmaker Iris Fraser-Gudrunas, stepped in to manage, eventually developing a vision for how Sirius Glassworks could evolve.
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The Designer Behind Your Favorite Shell-Shaped Accessories Just Dropped a New Collection

Where do you go when your last collection captured the Zeitgeist to a T? That's the dilemma that faced Rosa Rubio of the Barcelona-based Los Objetos Decorativos, whose saturated pastel ceramic seashell vases and catchalls went epically viral when they were released two years ago. For her latest collection, Rubio turned to another material that's been trending — colored glass — and again made it her own.
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Wright’s Upcoming Glass Auction is a Good Way to Stay Inspired From Your Couch

Among the other, more pressing, concerns this virus has wrought — Will production partners close? Will businesses go under? How the heck do you keep your kids out of the frame on a video conference call? — there is the more simple concern of how to stay inspired and engaged when there are no studio or site visits, no travel, no visiting with friends or other makers, and even a walk in nature has new rules. One of our most reliable sources of inspiration, though, has always been auction catalogs, and Wright has a doozy of one coming up in early April.
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Jagged, Glacier-Inspired Glass By a California Icon, On View at Hauser + Wirth

Larry Bell's latest exhibition at Hauser + Wirth, on view until April 11, might be the California Light & Space artist's largest presentation of work in New York yet. Called Still Standing, the title refers both to the octogenarian's practice, which shows no signs of slowing, and to what Bell calls his "standing walls" — aka the architecturally-scaled crystalline forms that result from Bell deconstructing his signature colored glass cubes.
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Starting At Noon Today, Snag One of These Experimental Glass Vessels for Under a Grand

This week, Artsy ran an article entitled "To Attract Young Collectors, Auction Houses Tap Rock Stars, Sneakerheads, and a Spice Girl." But Canadian designer Jeff Martin is taking a slightly more subtle tack: Starting today at noon, Martin is dropping a collection of small and "extra-medium" glass objects on the new webshop for his Excavated Vessels line, which we wrote about earlier last year. While Martin's larger vessels can go for as much as $12,000 depending on the scale and complexity of the work, nothing in this collection with be over $1,000, inclusive of shipping and taxes
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In a New Collection, Jonah Takagi Reimagines French Brutalism in Shimmering, Colored Glass

Jonah Takagi has always been inspired by architecture. His first foray into the design world, nearly a decade ago, included furniture inspired by Tinkertoys, and an early series of tables for Matter employed architectural elements in miniature, like I-beams, columns, and trusses. “My dad’s an architect, and it was something I considered pursuing,” Takagi says. “Now I make things that go inside buildings.” It makes sense, then, that Takagi’s latest collection — a series of stepped, angular glass vessels in deeply saturated or disco iridescent hues — would be inspired by one of architecture’s most recognizable structures: Le Corbusier’s Brutalist 1952 Unité d’Habitation housing complex in Marseilles, France.
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Devonmade_opener

The Artist Reimagining Fake Fruit for the Modern Era

Eye candy is called eye candy for a reason — but the Auckland, New Zealand–based Devon Made’s range of uncannily lifelike glass fruit creations take the phrase to a new level. (Is it just us who kind of want to put them in our mouths?) Edible impulses aside, artist Devyn Ormsby's perfectly translucent banana, pear, mandarin, and lemon likenesses in cobalt, lime, citrine, pink, and clear, have caught our eye (and stormed our Instagram).
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This Canadian Designer — Known for His Woodwork — Is Making the Most Epic Glass

When we posted our New York Design Week round-ups earlier this spring, there was one project we held for later because it was just. that. gorgeous. Amidst a sea of walnut, bronze, maple, and steel at Vancouver-based designer Jeff Martin's booth, we spied these craggy, colorful glass vessels, glinting under the lights of the Javits. Turns out, when we reached out to Martin for more information, that the process by which they're made — from the remnants of past projects — is as interesting as the way they look.
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