Here Are a Few of Our Favorite Things From This Year’s Salón Cosa in CDMX

For its third edition, the burgeoning Salón COSA, Mexico’s biannual “gathering of contemporary objects,” returned to its roots in CDMX after a stint in Guadalajara last fall. On a relatively intimate scale — 22 participating artists and designers showed recent and unpublished works — Salón COSA occupied the dance floor of an old cantina nestled among the cafés, nightclubs, and shops of Calle de Motolinia, one of the oldest streets in the city. With the walls and furniture of the bar-turned-exhibition-space cloaked in a fresh coat of cerulean blue, this year’s curation reflected Salón COSA’s nocturnal setting.
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The Experimental Mexico City Design Shop That’s On Our Must-Visit List

We've experienced such a shrink in the retail industry over the past two years that it honestly feels incredibly heartening to see a brick-and-mortar design store of all things opening in Mexico City this week. Called ORIGINARIO and led by Andrés Gutierrez — whose work we featured early last summer — the store is a destination where design folks can shop for furniture, objects, and art by homegrown talents, including Comité de Proyectos, CHUCH, Bestia, Raúl de la Cerda, Flama, A-G studio, and more.
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In Mexico City, An Up-and-Coming Design Studio Inspired by Institutional Aesthetics

The objects and furniture made by the Mexico City–based design studio Panorammma are difficult to pin in one particular box. Their concepts pivot from material focus — such as in their Neolithic Thinker chair, an upturned U-shaped seat made of volcanic tezontle stone — to abstract ideas, like the Sisyphean Table, a glass-topped Vignelli-esque cocktail table inspired by the concept of the absurd. But the thread that connects all of these approaches is a steady preoccupation with narrative and memory.
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Inside Circulo Mexicano, a Shaker-Inspired Retreat in the Middle of Mexico City

Mexico has no ties to the Shakers, the 18th-century New England–based Christian sect who were known for their minimalist and utilitarian furniture made from honest materials like local wood. And yet somehow, the Shaker-inspired interior at the new Circulo Mexicano hotel in Mexico City seems a perfect complement to what is perhaps the most colorful city in the world.
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This Mexico City–Based Designer Just Wants His Furniture and Interiors to Make You Feel Something

When I ask the Mexico City-based designer Andrés Gutiérrez what he hopes to achieve in his work, his answer, to be honest, makes me a bit emotional: “To make people feel something… If someone has a good time, or a better day in one of the spaces I helped to design, it’s all worth it.” How could you not catch feelings? Peppering his delightfully sensory portfolio are expanses of highly saturated tiled surfaces, an interior splashed in a hue best described as ube, and oversized wooden furniture with deliciously smooth knobs begging to be touched.
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This Mexican Modernist Masterpiece by Mario Pani Is Now a Rentable Guest House

Architect Miggi Hood, Yola Mezcal co-founder Yola Jimenez, and entrepreneur Marie Cazalaa knew they’d struck gold when — having set out to find a property in their part-time home of Mexico City that they could turn into a stylish guest house — they acquired a charismatic residence built in 1962 by the famed Mexican architect Mario Pani. The home had been in the same family since its construction and was extremely run-down; the three friends won the bid by promising to fully restore it and invite others in to experience its design and its history. They spent two years turning it into Casa Pani, which is now bookable on Airbnb.
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Week of March 8, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week had two distinct themes: lockdown projects — including a ceramic table, a neon-green sculpture, and a Rooms collaboration — and really kooky shit, including the anthropomorphized furniture above.
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James Evans’s Photorealistic Paintings Are a Meditation on Impermanence

The suffocated images of artist James Evans’ “Constraint Equation” series are a photorealistic depiction of what appears to be houseplants wrapped up in sheets of humid plastic that obscure and abstract them. Created during a period in quarantine, they are a fitting expression of the limitations and discomfort most of us have experienced this year. Evans, who grew up in Colorado and now splits his time between New York and Mexico City, is a prodigious new force in the art world.
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Guide to Mexico City

A Tour of Mexico City’s Secret Spots With One of Its Biggest Tastemakers

Despite being a recent transplant, Su Wu — who rose to prominence as a writer and curator with her cult-favorite blog I’m Revolting — is already a fixture on the local art and design scene in Mexico City. Spending the day with her would be a dream assignment for any design writer, or really anyone who considers themselves a fan of good things and great stories. From her family home to an all-but-lost Noguchi mural tucked away above a bustling downtown market, Wu’s vision of Mexico City stays true to her own compelling vernacular.
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One of the Best Galleries in Mexico City is Inside a Modernist Apartment

A hybrid cultural venue and design gallery intimately nestled in a modernist apartment building in the Roma Norte neighborhood of Mexico City, Studio IMA — which stands for “in my apartment” and nods to the Japanese word for “the present” — follows the shoppable interior model of The Apartment by the Line or Casa Perfect. But while those locations merely gesture towards an inhabited domestic space, Studio IMA founder Bettina Kiehnle Garza lives right alongside the art and objects on display day and night.
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Mexico City designer Alberto Oderiz

The Archeology of Mexican Artist-Architect Alberto Odériz

It’s no secret that here at Sight Unseen, we have a bit of an obsession with stone and its many forms. Perhaps that’s why we’re so smitten by the work of Mexican architect and sculptor Alberto Odériz. Stone is his inspiration, his material, and his passion. From small sculptures, to full room installations, to huge plazas and other inhabitable spaces, Odériz’s work is dynamic and innovative.
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