casawabi

A Round Table on the Ethics of Working With Artisans, and How to Respectfully Bridge Cultural and Geographic Divides

Over the last year, I've been laying the foundation for a new company that aims to connect Thailand and the U.S. through the universal languages of craft and design. I found myself thinking about how designers can foster a respectful, non-exploitive engagement when they're creating products with artisan communities rather than in factories, so I organized a roundtable discussion on the topic with three participants who have experience in bridging barriers of geography or culture: Peter Mabeo of Mabeo Furniture, Casa Wabi director Carla Sodi, and Tantuvi founder Arati Rao.
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2019_Jose Davila_Moment of Suspension_KOENIG GALERIE_Opener

A New Jose Dávila Exhibition in A Stunning Brutalist Church

If you've ever visited König Galerie in Berlin, which is housed in a renovated 1967 Brutalist church with a skylit concrete nave, you'll know that there are only a few places in the world to experience contemporary art in such a breathtaking setting. There are also only a few artists whose work would be quite so at home in that nave as Jose Dávila, the Mexican sculptor who trained as an architect and is known for his focus on space, balance, and proportion.
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Tatiana Bilbao furniture

A New Furniture Collection by Tatiana Bilbao, the Mexican Architect On Everyone’s Lips

The Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao is known for a kind of socially conscious, contextually sensitive, human-centered approach — so in hindsight it was only a matter of time before she would turn her attention to the realm of interiors and the way people interact within a space. If you're in Copenhagen this month, we would highly suggest first going to see Bilbao's solo exhibition at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art to learn about her ideas and working methods. But then head straight back into town to Étage Projects, to see Bilbao's first furniture collection.
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Ian Felton opener

Ian Felton’s Kosa Collection — Inspired by Pre-Colombian Cultures — is This Season’s Must-See Debut

Ian Felton's debut collection was supposed to arrive in New York in June, just in time for a showcase at Michael Bargo's Chinatown gallery. But, as luck would have it, the pieces — in transit from an atelier just outside of Mexico City — got stuck in customs and the collection, called Kosa, debuted only last week. In some ways, however, the new launch date seems appropriate: Felton's collection — all thick bolsters, chunky forms, and autumnal hues — was inspired by Pre-Colombian cultures and ideas around creation and rebirth — a very fall-like theme — not to mention how cozy it might be to snuggle up in the rounded corner of his alpaca-covered lounge chair.
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Colored Resin Meets Onyx in a Series of Textured Lamps Inspired by Mexico

In Elements, a colorful collection of imaginative light fixtures by Belgian-based architect Adrian Cruz, crystal resin light bulbs float, seemingly suspended, between resin plates, or balance atop slender pillars; some introduce raw materials like marble and onyx. “For me, the juxtaposition of onyx and resin [explores] the contrast between precious nature and modern man’s creations,” says Cruz.
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Julie Richoz 10

Experiments in Colored Glass, Inspired by the Palette of Mexico

As avowed colored glass evangelists, we practically consider it our saintly duty to bring your attention to one of the coolest, most beautiful glass objects we've seen in years: As part of a residency program supported by the Swiss Design Mexico program and the Swiss Embassy in Mexico, Swiss designer Julie Richoz spent the last year developing these two-toned Isla vases in collaboration with the glass-blowing masters at Nouvel Studio.
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The Mesmerizing Color-Field Paintings — Both Digital and Canvas — of Artist Ana Montiel

Questions about the nature of perception ­— the what, why, and how of consciousness ­— have been driving the work of Mexico-based artist Ana Montiel lately. And while any definitive answers to such age-old puzzles remain elusive, Montiel's work provides a kind of aesthetic response, making those mysteries both visual and material. There’s a mesmeric, meditative quality to her canvas and digitally-created color field paintings, reminiscent of the Light & Space art of the '60s and '70s.
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Mexico City architecture tour with @CB

Touring Mexico City With One of Our Favorite Architectural Photographers

IRL, Mexico City really is a charming mishmash of architectural styles, a delicious spot for foodies, and a serious destination for anyone interested in design culture. That’s why, when we saw that one of our favorite photographers — Eric Petschek, the interior designer and architectural photographer behind the Instagram account @cb — was in Mexico City documenting his trip with iPhone and DSLR in hand, we immediately reached out to see if we might publish the results.
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Jose Davila

Jose Davila Creates Sculptures From Glass, Stones, and Gravity

Using simple materials like stone and cardboard, Mexican artist Jose Dávila mines art history to create some of the most relevant works today. His oeuvre is defined by a diverse, medium-traversing output, from his precariously balanced sculptural arrangements to his “cutout” series, in which he extracts the focal point of iconic works of art, creating an absence that bestows a three-dimensionality upon the resulting pieces. In all of his art, there is an underlying exploration of how the modernist movement continues to influence the modern mind.
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Dana Haim geometric rugs

A Sophisticated, Geometric Rug Collection With Style to Spare

This week, Brooklyn textile designer Dana Haim released the fruits of an exploration into what her dream product might be — a collection of beautiful, naturally dyed rugs, with geometric prints that reimagine traditional Zapotec patterning through a more modern and minimal lens.
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The Plastiglomerate Pin by Poleta Rodete _Courtesy of Ángulo Cero_3

Jewelry Made From Stone, Resin, and Plastic Trash

Most of Mexican designer Poleta Rodete's jewelry is made from raw granite or marble. Her special collection for the Mexico City design gallery Ángulo Cero also appears to be composed of elements scavenged from nature — the kind of plastic or glass bits you sometimes find washed up on the shore — yet Rodete has fabricated the pieces from scratch, by mixing limestone, marble, granite, epoxy resin, and plastic trash to create an entirely new material.
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