Aldo Bakker copy

Aldo Bakker May Not Have Gone to Design School, But He is a Master Of His Craft

The first time we became aware of Aldo Bakker‘s work, it was way back in 2010, and he had just designed a copper watering can for the Dutch company Thomas Eyck that looked like this. What the heck was that? It was a strange shape, it turned the entire can into one big spout, it didn’t look like any watering can that had ever come before — and we loved it. In the years since, as we’ve watched Bakker’s work evolve, we’ve come to realize this is his MO: He is interested in unfamiliar silhouettes, he is fascinated by materiality, and he is inspired by watching, learning, and practicing various crafts. (He never went to design school, but learned at the feet of his mother, a noted jewelry designer, and his father, Gijs Bakker, co-founder of Droog.) His new show, Slow Motion — which opened at Carpenters Workshop Gallery in New York last week — extends those preoccupations. The pieces include stools, tables, and vessels whose materiality spans marble, quartzite, Urushi-lacquered foam, gold-plated silver, 3D-printed steel, porcelain, basalt, aluminum, and sandstone — and yet they still all feel like a loosely connected family. We particularly love Bakker’s wavy, paper-thin console, which sits on two feet that look like fish fins. On view through June 22.

MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_383_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_354_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_374_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_256_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_285_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_407_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_298_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_289_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_326_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_360_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_398_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_409_FINAL MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_340_FINAL BAKKER_Weight Wait (Urushi Ishimeji)_Console Table (Stone)_01 BAKKER_Compo_01 BAKKER_Newel (Vase)_01 BAKKER_Sitting Table (Urushi)_01 BAKKER_Three Pair (Stone)_01 MH_CWG_ALDOBAKKER_332_FINAL BAKKER_4prts (Marble)_01