Material Lust Independent

Frustrated by the Limits of Design, Material Lust Sets Its Sights on the Art World

Not much had recently been heard from Material Lust until this March, when, after a few quiet years, they popped back on our radar, showing neither at a design gallery nor a furniture show, but at the New York art fair Independent, in a Spring Studios skybox overlooking a maze of gallery booths. Frustrated by the literalness of conversations they were having in the world of furniture design — and with their practice taking an increasingly conceptual turn — the pair made the conscious decision to turn Material Lust from a design brand into an artist collective.
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Max Enrich_©Iris Humm_29

At 480 Square Feet, This Pastel Apartment in Barcelona is Tiny Yet Unbelievably Chic

Furniture designer Max Enrich’s Barcelona home is a veritable cabinet of curiosities, all exploded out into the living space. A Thonet bistro chair is suspended from the wall like a painting; a desk is filled with scissors of all varieties and ages; a stone bust adorns a bathroom counter; travertine samples are laid out as decoration; miniature chairs are arranged in a built-in, recessed display — the list could go on. And it is, after all, a list — an accumulation without seeming association, but that possesses surprising consonance.
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'ciaobeigeciao' chair in lilac_opener

In a New Series, A Sicilian Still-Life Artist Says Goodbye to Beige

The Sicilian-born, London-based designer Oscar Piccolo has a self-professed obsession. He is compelled to take vases and arrange them just so, manipulating how the light shines through, meticulously moving through tableaux until arriving — ecstatically — at just the right one. This fascination, he admits, “is becoming a bit of a problem.” Yet at the core of this compulsion is a relatively simple proposition: “All in all, my work explores the relation between objects and their positioning.”
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Giancarlo Valle_opener

The In-Demand Architect–Turned–Furniture Designer to Know Now

Giancarlo Valle didn’t set out to design furniture. A trained architect, his practice moved first indoors to interiors, then even further to the things that fill them. An interest in objects initially manifested in the collecting of furniture from across eras, but soon, collecting wasn’t enough. At Collective Design this spring, he debuted his first collection in a holistic installation that saw his own highly personal pieces alongside historical ones. Last week, for Sight Unseen OFFSITE, Valle debuted new work in collaboration with Viso Project, a new, sustainability-focused textile studio.
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