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Oyyo’s New Swedish Flat-Weaves Are a Master Class on the Reuse of Leftover Yarns

For Oyyo's new series, Landing Site Irregular, the focus was on the reuse of leftover dyed yarns to create experimental compositions in custom colors, such as vibrant-azure blue and light tangerine. Smaller in size than their original offerings, these rugs breathe new life into the yarn, but the geometric underpinnings remain, inspired by visionary architects and artists Shusaku Arakawa and Madeline Gins’s theories on space and color.
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Our Favorite Launches From Stockholm Design Week 2020

Some of our favorite launches from Stockholm Design Week include a duo of dream sofas — one soft and pillowy, one firm yet cozy — a lamp made from cast iron, a group of student furniture made from limestone, a curated apartment that beautifully mixed art and design, and a lamp from 1953 with — you guessed it — a ball base, in production for the first time ever.
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The Soft Serve Aesthetic of Anton Alvarez’s Extruded Ceramic Sculptures

The Flavour Is So Strong — Anton Alvarez’s second solo exhibition at the Stockholm gallery Larsen Warner — opened last week, situating Alvarez’s hyper-colorful, texturally striking sculptures within a peaceful white setting at the gallery’s new space in Ostermalm. Alvarez has always been interested in formal instability, and these new objects — a continuation of his work with a kind of automated ceramic extrusion — challenge our perception of weight as well as gravity, while embracing the imperfections inherent to the process of transforming wet clay inside a kiln.
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This Swedish Illustrator’s Soft-Edged Work Might Be the Calming Influence We All Need Right Now

If you're a relatively highly attuned design person — and chances are, if you're here, you are — you might recognize the work of Swedish-born, Barcelona-based designer and illustrator Klas Ernflo (and not just because it often reminds us of another perennial SU fave, Geoff McFetridge). Ernflo's done work for Apartamento, Domus, Frame, IKEA, Mother London, Oyyo, and more, in addition to keeping up his own studio with drawings, paintings, and sculpture. But it's his latest project that we find the most fascinating.
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In a New Show, 3D Printed Objects So Real They Look Fake

Called "Transitional Speculation," the show blurs the line between the digital and physical worlds even more than Wang Söderstrom's work normally does: While their 3D illustrations often have a whiff of handicraft, here, they've made tangible objects — primarily printed in 3D — that seem to take on the blobby, hyper-real aesthetic a rendering would typically have.
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Digital Renderings of “Rocks and Light,” Inspired by Mono-ha

Plenty of designers are obsessed with Mono-ha. But when Swedish art director Anders Brasch-Willumsen looked closer at the Japanese art movement, he noticed one thing in particular he could personally relate to: the ephemeral nature of its works. "The works that came out of Mono-ha would often exist only in photographs," he says. "I felt connected to this idea because creating digital sculptures is similar: they only exist in images." Inspired by that realization, Brasch-Willumsen decided to create "Rocks and Light," a new series of digital artworks pictured after the jump.
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Our Favorite Finds From Stockholm Design Week 2017

Though the design world often looks to Scandinavia for trends, this year's Stockholm Design Week didn't so much define new patterns in design as give us perfect examples of the current styles. There were new takes on channel tufting; color-blocked interiors; peaches, rusts, aquas and pinks; tubular metal; and lots of bleached wood.
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In a New Show, Hilda Hellström Blurs the Line Between What is Real and What is Fake

When we first interviewed Swedish designer Hilda Hellström back in 2012, just two weeks after her graduation from London's Royal College of Art, the designer drew an interesting distinction between her work and that of her peers: While so many Hellström's age were obsessed with the properties of different materials, she was more interested in the possibilities of narrative. But a funny thing happened in the five years that have elapsed since then: Hellström hasn't been able shake her fascination with pigmented Jesmonite, the acrylic-based plaster she originally used in her breakout Sedimentation vases.
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This Former Acne Art Director Makes Furniture With a Graphic Eye

When we first encountered Swedish designer Erik Olovsson two years ago in the basement of Rossana Orlandi, he had but two products to his name — a wavy-lined metal and marble clothes rack and a modular, geometric shelving unit, both created in collaboration with his fellow graduate and graphic designer Kyuhyung Cho. Since then, Olovsson has been developing and tinkering with the beautiful projects he's unveiling in Milan this week.
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Seriously Modern Vibes From a Collection Inspired by Ancient Texts

With so many designers mining references from only the last decade or so, it can be weirdly refreshing to talk to someone like Nick Ross, whose influences run more towards Mesopotamia than Memphis. Ancient trade routes, Greek and Roman sculptures — these are the things that inspire the Stockholm-based, Scottish-born designer, whom we first featured when he was graduating from Konstfack a few years back. His thesis project there spawned an instant classic — the White Lies table, which features a marble-topped column with a richly saturated gradient fading down its trunk. Since then, Ross has been thinking about and working on this new collection, which he's debuting at the Milan furniture fair next week.
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Colorful Kitchen Accessories by the Designer Behind Your Favorite Brand

If you've ever lusted after many of Hay's simple but colorful accessories — from the ultra-covetable Strike matches to the duotone Analog clock — you have Shane Schneck to thank for that. The Swedish-American designer, along with his wife Clara von Zweigbergk, has for years created products and headed up the art direction for the Danish brand from his studio in Stockholm. Now, Schneck is bringing his finely tuned eye to another Scandinavian-chic housewares brand: Ommo, a colorful kitchen accessories collection that's debuting in the U.S. this week.
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