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A New Lighting Collection Inspired By the 1960s Modernism of Fire Island Pines

“Growing up, I always love stained glass,” recalls Peter B. Staples, discussing the early design experiments that would eventually lead to the launch of his lighting brand Blue Green Works. “I grew up in a Craftsman-style home, and one summer, my dad and I found the plans for the original stained glass lanterns. We taught ourselves how to fix and recreate them. I was probably 12 at the time and that experience really stayed with me.” But while the exercise was clearly formative, Staples would have to take a circuitous path through the New York design scene before returning to lighting. Having previously worked at The Future Perfect and Apparatus, Blue Green Works marks the first time Staples has designed a collection himself — which you would never guess just by looking at it.
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8 Must-See Projects From This Year’s Venice Design Biennial

After a year of visiting virtual exhibitions, it’s a joy to finally start venturing out IRL again. Where I am here in Italy, things really began to pick up speed last week with the opening of the Venice Biennale, which always brings with it a slew of contemporaneous projects — one of which being the Venice Design Biennial, now in its third year. Curated by Venice Art Factory’s Luca Berta and Francesca Giubilei, this year’s theme was "Design as a Self Portrait" and featured work that spoke, loosely, to the notion of self-representation in design.
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Week of May 3, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a French midcentury–inspired furniture collection by fashion designer Christian Siriano, an extremely good entrant to our mental "cool flatware" list, and the Instagram-famous sofa reissue we've all been waiting for.
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Blistered Leather and Melted Aluminum — Soft Baroque’s New Works Were Inspired By the Sun

After a year of pretty much everything being on hold, we’re finally seeing the fruits of some of that pre-COVID labor. For those of us here in Milan, that means projects originally slated for the canceled 2020 Design Week are at last seeing the light of day. One of the better projects to have made it out the other side is Sun City, a collaboration between PIN-UP magazine, Soft Baroque, and Marséll, the Milanese footwear brand. Set over three levels in Marséll’s headquarters in an ex-factory in the Porta Romana district, Soft Baroque debuted — during the Digital Design Days in April — a slew of new work, each piece loosely inspired by the sun.
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Sara Rydberg Nilsson on the Perks and Pitfalls of Turning Your Home Into a Gallery

It may sound like some sort of aesthetic fever dream to live full time in a design gallery but, in practice, it’s not without its hazards. After a show at her flat-turned-exhibition space in Stockholm, interior designer Sara Rydberg Nilsson, aka Studio Hilda, left a pink ceramic raku sculpture by Swedish artist Bo Arenander in a corner of one of the apartment’s rooms. “My son Max accidentally knocked it over,” she says, recalling her horror. Though the sculpture ultimately survived the trauma, it was left with a deep crack, threatening the integrity of its delicate structure. The upside? She had an excuse to keep it for herself.
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Week of April 19, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week: a pop star's Melbourne home that's genuinely to die for, the return of a beloved LA exhibition, and a flat-pack wooden table that looks like an Aalto left out in the sun (above).
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Emily Mullin’s 3D Reliefs Are Like Morandi Still-Lifes On Acid

The new sculptures that make up Brooklyn-based artist Emily Mullin’s just-opened show at Jack Hanley Gallery are, to put it lightly, a riot: fringed or seemingly filigreed ceramic vessels scrawled on with what looks like crayon or painted in imprecise patterns, sitting atop blobby, brightly colored plinths. At first glance, you wouldn’t associate the boisterous reliefs with the quiet, muted tones found in still lifes by 20th-century Italian painter Giorgio Morandi, but upon further inspection, the comparison makes a lot of sense.
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In a New Exhibition, Abstract Paintings and Anthropomorphic Vessels Pair Perfectly

In ballet terms, a pas de deux is a duet. Two dancers perform a sequence in such perfect, excruciating synchronicity that it appears they are, for the fleeting moments they inhabit the stage, two halves of the same whole. This kind of creative coupling is what curator Kitty Clark had in mind when she put together her latest show, Soul Bed, featuring painter Hannah Nowlan and ceramic artist Tatsiana Shevarenkova, which just opened its doors at Saint Cloche Gallery in Sydney, Australia.
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Week of March 15, 2021

A weekly Saturday recap to share with you our favorite links, discoveries, exhibitions, and more from the past seven days. This week in design: Things are getting weird a year into the pandemic, with the greatest charcuterie-themed tissue box in existence and a giant painting served toilet-side in a Mexico City bathroom.
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Kristina Krogh’s Plaster Reliefs Are Like Zen Gardens For Your Walls

It seems there’s no ending plaster’s reign as material of the moment and, honestly, we’re not mad about it — especially after coming across Danish artist and designer Kristina Krogh’s wall-hung reliefs. Made of wavy lines of plaster mounted on wood and colored in a soft gradient with acrylic paint, each of the pieces in her latest series — which come in a variety of shapes from amorphous discs to more conventional rectangles — is an original work.
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The Parisian Design Duo Channelling 1970s French Glamour

The 1970s were, arguably, one of the best eras in French design. It’s a decade that saw then-president George Pompidou commission Pierre Paulin to reimagine the Élysée Palace’s interiors in his unorthodox space-age designs, and the stiff conventions of mid-century modernism finally loosened into an ironically cosmopolitan glamour. So when we came across French design duo Hauvette & Madani’s sumptuous interiors that so perfectly channel that decade’s vibe, we were instant fans.
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